Kings Point in the business world

Discussion in 'Merchant Marine Academy - USMMA' started by lieutenantdan, Apr 12, 2015.

  1. lieutenantdan

    lieutenantdan Member

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    Hi,

    I received my appointment to KP a few days ago and have a limited amount of time to make my decision. I'm in the process of scheduling a campus tour, but I would like to run some questions by this forum first. Mainly, is KP a good, practical decision for someone who doesn't know much about sailing? Is a degree from here valuable in civilian life? I live in North Texas, so I don't have any experience sailing and don't know if I would like it. What attracted me to apply to this place was the hands on engineering education, traveling, and the reputation KP has for producing top business executives. If I don't know much about boating, or sailing, is this still a good idea? Is it easy to get an MBA, or a good management position graduating from KP?

    If my questions/motives seem disrespectful, I apologize in advance
     
  2. Jen1790

    Jen1790 Member

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    You don't need to know about sailing to work on a deep draft ship! But if you want to learn sailing, there will be a class, the ability to check out small boats, and sailing teams/club. KP will teach you everything you need to know and much more if you are willing and ready! Go for it...
     
  3. Usnavy2019

    Usnavy2019 Member

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    ltdan,

    No worries! That's what these forums are here for. Do not worry that you do not know much about sailing. There's a lot of kids that come in with little to no boating experience. Others have a lot. Just apply yourself in classes and during Indoc and you will do just fine. It might be difficult to pick some concepts up at first, but you will not be alone and keep in mind, the school's mission is to train and graduate competent maritime officers. They will make sure you have all the knowledge you need. It isn't too difficult to get an MBA or a management position. I will be honest with you that if you declare an Engine major, then you will not have too many business courses. Business courses are more on the deck side of the house. Keep that in mind, but you don't have to declare a major until the middle of Plebe Year. You will have to take a class called KP 100 which shows you the ins and outs of deck and engine majors so you can make an informed decision. A lot of kids come in thinking they want a specific major, and change it because of that class, which is perfectly fine. Some of the shore side positions KP grads get start in middle management. Again, most of those graduates are deck majors. Many KP grads have said that the workload KP puts on you makes Grad School a piece of cake. Some also sail for a little bit (or a while) and then make the jump over to management (mostly with shipping companies). Hope some of this helps. I hope to see you at Indoc. I'm on Hold right now.
     
  4. beyond

    beyond KπΣ15'

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    Colloquially 'sailing' refers to going to sea. If someone said "I want to sail when I graduate from KP" it would be understood to mean they are talking about a ship with engines, not sails.

    Beauty of KP is options. If you really really hate sailing (...most people come to enjoy it enough) you can try and snag an active duty slot or try and work shore side. There are a very small numbers of EDRs being granted to work ashore, usually need to be for the federal government in a maritime capacity. The shipping industry its self is so varied that most people are able to find a comfortable niche to settle in shipping wise. Time at home, pay, and lifestyle are all wildly variable across the different sectors of the industry between inland, offshore, and deep sea.
     
  5. beyond

    beyond KπΣ15'

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    I'll agree with the broad strokes of this post, but there are a lot of nuances that people won't understand unless they spend some time as on the other side of vickery gate. So I'll comment on the following based on my limited exposure to the KP network.

    By virtue of being accepted you've demonstrated that you have the raw talent to make it four years at KP. But this whole thing of "just try your best" is kind of BS. You've got to preform. KP is very much a make the grade or get out world, it isn't about trying, it's about doing, and meeting the standards set for you. I applaud people for trying to support one another, but nice words and encouragement won't help you when Captain Hard hands you a piece of chalk and sends you to the board to sketch a bearing problem.

    I'd say the shipyard majors are an exception to this rule, they seem to spend more time in Bowditch than others. @KPEngineer would be the guy to chime in on this.

    Major and Split selection comes before the end of first tri. It isn't called KP 100 in the new curriculum, and personal opinion here it isn't a totally unbiased tool to making an informed decision about which major is for you. The engineering side of the house realizes that the freshman survey course is a great recruiting opportunity, the engineering course is fun, interesting, and doesn't get deep enough into things to get too boring. The deck side on the other hand use this class as an education opportunity, topics like block and tackle and nylon vs. manilla line, it wasn't nearly as fun or representative of what deckies do as the engine side I didn't think. I went deck irrespective of my KP100 experience and couldn't be happier.

    This is a great chance to remind everyone of the legal commitment upon graduation. 5 years sailing 150 days a year. Hold a license for 6 years. 8 years to the naval reserve. The outside perception that everyone winds up staying connected to the marine industry couldn't be farther from the truth. @kp2001 posted today about a KP grad featured on food network, I know of a 2012 grad in the process of starting a self storage company, doctors (...like @kp2001), lawyers, Kings Pointers are everywhere and the spread is greater than most realize. There certainly is a KP network in the maritime industry, but the reach elsewhere is greater than most people acknowledge. Below are three screen shots from linkedin of people who are KP graduates, sorted by city, San Diego, Washington DC, and Charlotte NC as some examples of graduate employment after the sailing commitment is finished. A tiny fraction are shipping companies, while a few more have a maritime flavor like Caterpillar, but the point is the spread of graduates 5-10 years removed from KP is huge (...or as a long islander would say Uuuuge). It doesn't really matter what your major is either, deck or engine, you can write your own ticket in whatever sector you like.
     

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  6. cmakin

    cmakin Member

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    My nautical experience prior to starting at KP was a bit of sailing with a Great Uncle who would rent a sailboat when he came into town (Santa Barbara at the time) and we would go out to the sea buoy and back. My experience in marine engineering was nil. By the time I signed on to my first sea year ship, I had a pretty good understanding of the basics of a marine plant so as to not look too foolish to the rest of the black gang. By the time I got out, I was pretty comfortable "sailing" for a career. The first couple of watches were a bit nerve wracking, but overall, not too bad. I found that KP did a good job in giving me the knowledge and ability to be a competent marine engineer. These days I work as an insurance adjuster for the energy business and that includes some marine work, lots of offshore and onshore work for the drilling and energy industries. I really like what I do now, and had no clue as to this kind of business when I was in high school. There is a lot not to like about KP when you are going through the experience. But that is the point. There are lots of alumni in various positions in business and the maritime business and many with MBAs, Law Degrees, etc. It isn't for everyone and your visit may tell you that. Personally, I am glad I went and was pretty blind going in.
     
  7. KPEngineer

    KPEngineer Eternal Father ...

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    I always thought the business classes were just schedule fillers for the deckies who need simpler math and something to keep 12 credits and full time status.

    I was sweathog but my graduating class was the first class to have engineering management. I don't recall them having any pure business courses but more Program/Project Management type classes with an emphasis on shipyards and construction. That seems to jive with the current curriculum posted on the KP website.

    I am assuming changing majors still remains an option for those with buyers remorse. That typically involves a setback, but personally a set back is an easy price to pay for a degree in a field you actually like.
     
  8. lieutenantdan

    lieutenantdan Member

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    So is marine engineering fairly broad? Could I go into mech or electrical for grad school if I don't end up liking it?
     
  9. cmakin

    cmakin Member

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    Not sure what the curriculum is now because my class was the first to have the "Systems" track offered (but not then accredited). Like the nature of the job onboard, the Marine Engineering major for me was very broad. From thermodynamics to welding and machining. . . . some wrench twisting, too, especially during sea year.
     
  10. KPEngineer

    KPEngineer Eternal Father ...

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    The coursework difference between Mechanical Engineering and Marine Engineering is very small. The difference between Marine Engineering Systems and Mechanical Engineering is bordering on non-existant. With my non-Systems, Marine Engineering degree I was able to qualify for the Mechanical Engineer job series for the US Gov. I have a dualie classmate who is now an Engineering professor at a major university.

    By the way ... I noticed in reviewing the curriculum that many of the course names have changed. I think this does a disservice to graduates. The parallels between Mech and Marine Engineering are no longer apparent ... Tommy T strikes again!
     

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