Law School?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Academy_Questions, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. Academy_Questions

    Academy_Questions Member

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    Hi I have recently been considering ROTC in addition to an SA, and was just wondering how the process might work to get to go to Law School? I ofcourse understand the additional time commitment, and that I am always a soldier/airman/sailor first, but was just wondering about the process. Also, how does it work when attending an academy?

    thanks!
     
  2. NROTCDAD55

    NROTCDAD55 Member

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    Let me tell you a story -

    One of the most strategic persons I ever knew went to the USAFA, and because he had eyesight issues, was a missleman in the Dakotas. So after doing that for a few years and becoming a Capt, he applied for the law school program through the USAF and was selected as one of about 40-50 officers that year to attend law school. He went to the University of Florida (largely to defrost), and the military paid for his tuition, housing, etc., and paid him his salary as a Capt for three years. He owed them 2-for-1: in other words, he owed six additional years for the three years of law school. Well, he was a circuit prosecutor in Europe for about four-six years and thought that when he got out he would like to do something other than criminal law, so he applied for and was accepted for an LL.M. at Georgetown. Again, the military paid for tuition and everything else, except that by the time the year was out he had been promoted and was earning Major's money. Again, the 2-for-1 kicked in, but by the time he was done with his commitment (5+6+2=13), he was only 7 years from retirement, with three paid-for degrees and NEVER a missed paycheck. The guy is a large firm lawyer now making big $. THAT was the way to do it!
     
  3. Riv-Rod

    Riv-Rod Member

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    think he figured out how to do it while missile watching?
     
  4. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    There are various ways to get your law degree while in the military. Each service (other than USMC, which uses USN attorneys), has different policies. I only know the policy for the USN and then only for folks already on active duty -- sorry.

    If you are on active duty in the USN, you can apply to their law school program. The first requirement is that you must start law school no more than six years to the day from the day you were commissioned. This is not waiverable. Given that USNA and NROTC types typically are commissioned in May or June, this means you start after (basically) 5 yrs, which means you need to do your prep and applications in year 4. Just saying.

    You apply to law school and the USN. IF you are accepted by USN to be in the program, the USN decides the law school you will attend. They pay tuition and your salary (I think), from which you pay for room & board. Once you graduate, you go to JAG school and then you owe the USN an additional 6 yrs active duty beyond any obligations you already have. Your first tour is likely to be on a carrier.

    I believe all services also have a way for civilians to attend law school and then go into JAG. How those programs work and the length of your commitment may vary -- I would check with the officer recruiter in your area for the service in which you're interested for details.
     
  5. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Another way to do it, BTW, is to get out of the military and put yourself through law school; that's what I did. There are pluses and minuses for doing it each way -- there is no right way but one way may be better for you depending on your circumstances.

    Also, JAG is NOT like the TV show. The advantage to being a JAG is that you will get to try real cases, from both the defense and prosecution perspectives. However, there is also a lot of scut work, as with any job.
     
  6. Academy_Questions

    Academy_Questions Member

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    thank you for the great information!
    haha. i've never even SEEN JAG, so no worries. i'm very practical :)
     
  7. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    For the AF, you must serve 2 yrs before you apply for the JAG program, and I believe they only take 40 students each yr. I don't know the % of acceptances, but I will tell you that is our DS's top back up plan if no he doesn't get UPT
     

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