Legacy?

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by educ8, Feb 18, 2014.

  1. educ8

    educ8 Member

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    I'm just curious if it is an asset or a liability if you have a sibling already at an SA or a parent that served? Our son is currently at USMAPS and (presumably) will be in the USMA class of 2018 and I served in the Army back in the stone age. Our daughter is a candidate to the USMA class of 2018 also. She also applied to USNA, USAFA and USCGA. On each of the applications they asked about parents and siblings and specifically asked if parents had been/were in the military (their rank, branch, MOS etc.) and/or if they had/were attending an SA.

    We were just wondering if it was in the plus column...as in - the candidate knows what she is getting into, comes from a military family, understands the commitment, etc. OR, if it was in the minus column - as in -spread the wealth around - one kid in an SA is enough - give someone else a chance.

    We have seen many instances of multiple children at the same SA or in different SA's at the same time but maybe they are super stars. Just wondering...:rolleyes:
     
  2. mom3boys

    mom3boys Parent

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    We were told it was in the "plus column" as far as the CC knows what he/she is getting into...but not necessarily a plus that makes it any easier to get in. Although, I would think being related to some people might make it more advantageous more than being related to others might be. :cool:
     
  3. Stevewar2

    Stevewar2 Member

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    Legacy

    I think it's a plus. I understand the process and could guide my DD through the wickets. 12 K plus open an application but only @2 K get through all the hoops. If you know the process and can get ur kid to the 3Q + NOM stage then they are much more viable. I don't think being a grad or being in the Army is so much of an advantage as just knowing how to get through the process. I had DD look at it as a mission to be accomplished instead if just another college app. Additionally, having a Presidential/SDVET NOM didn't hurt.
     
  4. educ8

    educ8 Member

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    So I guess the question is...why do they even ask if you have a sibling in an SA? It has to be more than just curiosity.
     
  5. Stevewar2

    Stevewar2 Member

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    Numbers

    WP and the Army loves statistics. Correlations, probabilities, etc. They have magic formulas that show and say all
     
  6. BigNick

    BigNick Member

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    Interesting question.
    Based on several years as a Field Force representative - a West Point Graduate - and a son currently at West Point I would make several points.
    1. I do not think that it is an advantage or disadvantage in getting accepted to West Point. I know many Generals and Colonels sons who did not get accepted.
    2. It is an advantage in preparing for West Point physically and mentally. Only West Point graduates and Cadets have a real "gut level" knowledge of West Point ands what it takes to be successful. This knowledge can be passed on to the candidates and make them better prepared.
    3. I think it enables the candidate to have a better understanding of the value of West Point and the importance and honor of being a member of the Long Grey Line
     
  7. 845something

    845something Member

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    As for why WP or any SA would ask:
    1) not all candidates/families with military or SA affiliation understand the full process so it gives the RC relevant information to better inform and guide a candidate. For example, the process for a recruited athlete through USMAPS would be different than a sibling applying directly. Not all families with military parents know about the service connected nominations. All this would go unnoticed by the RC if it wasn't specifically asked and could cause an otherwise qualified candidate to slip through the procedural gap.
    2) it also provides admissions with likely intentions. If parent is one service, if one sibling is at one service academy, etc, it OFTEN translates that the candidate will lean that way. Again, this arms the RC with relevant information. If it is someone that they really want and there is a familial allegiance to another service, they may have to work harder to convince them to accept. Likewise, it allows them to plan for the possibility of someone not accepting which they would need to keep another candidate in the queue.
     
  8. buff81

    buff81 Moderator

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    For admission purposes-
    there are no WCS points for being a legacy
     
  9. tug_boat

    tug_boat Member

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    Legacy....

    Ha!! Politics can and do play a part of the selection process.

    Push Hard, Press Forward
     

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