List of disqualifications for Naval Academy

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by mveach_74, May 8, 2012.

  1. mveach_74

    mveach_74 Member

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    Does anyone know where I can get a full list of medical disqualifications to the Naval Academy? Particularly involving patellar dislocations...
     
  2. mveach_74

    mveach_74 Member

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    and the use of braces to help prevent this again ^^
     
  3. navyasw02

    navyasw02 Member

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    I am in no way a medical expert or qualified to give you any certified advice on this, but you may want to check out the medical manual:

    http://www.med.navy.mil/directives/Pages/NAVMEDP-MANMED.aspx

    Article 15-14 has things for USNA, 15-30 and beyond has commissioning requirements.

    I looked up a few things with a HMC for my diver physical in this and it was helpful at the time to get that monster of a physical done. Again, I am by no means a medical expert, doctor, trained professional, or anything else along those lines, but this might at least give you some insight.
     
  4. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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  5. CHS11111

    CHS11111 Member

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    400 disqualifications!?? Daunting....

    Ok, I just read through the list of DQ factors...it seems that very few people would not have any of these. My son has had childhood asthma (under age 13) and still has a bit of eczema (has not been treated for it for years though) and also wears contact lenses, but does not have terrible vision. Does he have any shot at all or are these 3 strikes against him? Are some of the SA more lenient than others as far as granting waivers goes? How about ROTC? Or is it pretty much DQ for one = DQ for all? We are working so hard on every other aspect of getting him accepted, it would just be so heartbreaking to not pass the physical. Also, at what point in the process is the physical done? Thanks in advance for any advice!
     
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    All of these issues can become a DQ, nobody here can tell you if it will ever be a DQ.

    I would move forward, have the medical records handy.

    Right now he needs to go from being applicant to candidate. You do not know if the SA/ROTC boards will even allow him to become a candidate.

    One step at a time.
     
  7. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    Different standards for different programs. For example, you can pass the USMA standard with color blindness, while for USCGA and USMMA it is a DQ.

    Never let the chance of a medical DQ stop his quest.

    Let THEM make that determination.

    Yes it can be heartbreaking when a dream is derailed by something we may think is inconsequential, but they've had years of data to know what "will" and what "will not be" a problem for the cadet/mid/officer or a problem for the Govt over a 20-year period.

    After the application has been started, usually some time in the late summer/early fall they will send you information about scheduling your examination. Recently, only if the candidate is deemed "competitive" will his/her name be forwarded for the medical examination.
     
  8. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    The ONLY guaranteed way of not receiving an appointment, ....... is to NOT APPLY.

    If a person wants a list of things that will automatically disqualify them from receiving an appointment, and they are wanting this so they supposedly "Don't Waste Their Time" by applying; then you need to do some soul searching as to whether you truly want to serve in the military. Few if any supposed disqualifications can't be waivered. Everything from eye sight to broken bones can have a waiver submitted. Some are approved and some are not.

    If you truly want to serve your country in the military; want to attend a military academy; and become a commissioned officer........ Then You Apply. If you are looking at just the benefits, education, etc... and don't want to waste your time applying if there's a "Good Chance" that you won't qualify, then I recommend not even applying. The person who truly wants to serve, will apply to any/all the academies that they want; they'll apply for all the ROTC scholarships that they can; and if that doesn't work out, they'll attempt ROTC on their own and possibly go the OCS route if necessary.

    Except for being a quadriplegic or similar extreme example, you have no idea what the academies/military will waiver and what they won't. Not until you apply and let the dice roll. If you don't want to waste your time, then just don't apply. That's easy enough. You'll fill out your application and you'll have a physical. If they want to disqualify you, they will. If they want to give you a waiver, they will. You choose whether to apply or not. Best of luck. mike....
     
  9. CHS11111

    CHS11111 Member

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    Thanks for the advice! I realize, no one can give me any concrete answers...just looking for some guidance. It is fairly early days for DS (10th grade this year) but he is in full prep mode! We have plans B,C, D, & E in place as well...he plans on applying to 3 SA, and NROTC w/at least 3 schools, College Plan, MC Platoon Leader -- all of these things he is willing to try for. He has always wanted to be an Officer (MC if possible) and I don't see him backing away from that regardless of the chances until he is given a definitive 'NO'. I hope and pray one way or another that will happen. Thanks again!
     
  10. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    Your son doesn't have 3 strikes. The asthma is only disqualifying if AFTER the 13th birthday. Eczema - gonna depend. Contact lenses again depends on the severity of his correction.
    The bonus for applying to a bunch of programs is it may get him started on the dodmerb process earlier than if he only applied to one program.
     
  11. JMS

    JMS Member

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    I suspect if joint dislocations (and other similar injuries) were a really big problem the Academies would not be able to field a football team.
     
  12. debcst

    debcst Member

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    mveach,

    My son has a history of patellar dislocations (2). He was disqualified but received a waiver. This was for USMA, and every individual case is different, but I thought you might be encouraged to know that a waiver is possible for this condition.
     
  13. navyasw02

    navyasw02 Member

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    Regardless, you can get a waiver for anything in the military. It's not always a guarantee, but might as well try.
     
  14. mveach_74

    mveach_74 Member

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    I have had the same. Would I even be obligated to tell them about it as long as I dont have anything major like surgery done to correct it? When I wear a brace I feel fine. The doc just says my knee was prone for it to happen and now I need to strengthen my quads and muscles on that side to avoid it again but it still could be a factor. Once im in for a good amount of time, if it ever happened again they could easily fix it with a simple surgery to tighten my mcl to keep it from popping out again. But until then, I need to try to keep it healthy and avoid surgery. Does this seem correct and like a good plan?
     
  15. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    If u "need" to wear a brace, u have a problem. U can't be going to bct with a brace.
     
  16. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    ^truth. You are going to have to get rid of the brace. Perhaps some physical therapy is in order?

    While some conditions - i.e. diabetes, cancer - are not waiverable; many conditions are waiverable; it just *depends* on your own personal health and history.
    Dodmerb is only allowed to act in black or white. They are binary - any check marks will cause a DQ. Many times, the DQ is simply a way for the service to look more closely at each persons situation. This is especially true in "history of" DQ's.

    For example - lots of people get waivers for history of dislocation. Many of those are waived after they look at specific factors such as - the number of, the length of time since, any treatments, prognosis and underlying conditions to name a few.
    One can't just say since this guy got a waiver I am getting one too - or vice versa.
     

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