Marine Option NROTC Regular Board Chances

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Wittiest, Jan 2, 2016.

  1. Wittiest

    Wittiest New Member

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    I applied to the early board with over-average academics(4.4 GPA, 34 ACT) and the position of XO in my NROTC unit, as well as, participation on every team in said unit.

    I had a 219 on my PFT, which I believe was the sole reason I was denied from the early board.

    I have trained, and believe I should be able to have a 240-260 by the February Regular Board (20 pullups, 100 crunches, 24:00-25:00 3 mile)

    Does anyone know the average PFT accepted at the regular board for 2015?

    Does anyone know if there are individual minimums on PFT sections, like a maximum 3 mile time, or if they look solely at the PFT score XXX/300?

    Thanks.
     
  2. mgreen

    mgreen Member

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    The PFT follows the Marine Corps standard and is reviewed as a composite number (xxx/300) and not by individual components. In order to be competitive, I believe you need to be closer to 260 or over. Keep running and good luck.
     
  3. mgreen

    mgreen Member

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    BTW, my DS averaged 23 minutes on his training runs. He completed his official PFT run in 19:23, 16 pull ups and 100 crunches. He was selected on the Early Board with a 271 PFT.

    Finally, the PFT is important, but the process looks at "total person". So it's equally important to practice for the interview.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2016
  4. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    Wittiest: yes, there are minimums on each component. I believe it is 28 minutes on the mile and 3 pull ups for instance. You are maxing your pull ups and crunches but the run is killing you. You need to get the run time down significantly. Total PFT score should be north of 250 (the higher the better)

    While it seems accurate that your 219 hurt you, don't assume that is your only trouble spot. The board considers your application, essays, academics, test scores, interview and PFT in its assessment. Search for posts from "rocatlin" who provides a link to a great article on the process.
     
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  5. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    Agree with Grunt. 219 isn't even a First Class PFT for your age, 225 and above is. I would think a 250 or above is really want you want to see on the application. The reason this is so heavily emphasized is because it's a huge part of OCS and being an officer. A first class is an unwritten rule as an officer. Heck in some combat arms units you will see anyone below a 250 doing 'extra PT.' To make it through OCS you will need to really be in the 275 range with around a 20:00 minute 3 mile to make it through there. Agree the whole package is absolutely looked at as the USMC wants well rounded officers, but a 219 more than likely hurt you. The rest of your stuff looks solid and your grades and ACT are very good. Rocatlin has some great advice his posts, check them out as Grunt said.
     
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  6. rocatlin

    rocatlin Member

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    Here is the link that USMCGrunt was referring to...

    http://www.thesandgram.com/2011/01/18/nrotc-marine-option-scholarships/

    Keep yourself actively engaged in the process. Hopefully the ones handling your package have monthly meetings. Go workout with PLC candidates and enlisted poolees if you need to. It really isn't a fire and forget process on your part.

    You want this process to be tough. I know those of us that wore the uniform want it to be.
     
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  7. rocatlin

    rocatlin Member

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    A few questions / concerns...

    1) Have you contacted the RS / Officer in Charge of your board package to get feedback? Keep involved in the process.
    2) Too late now, but how did your 2 or 3 officer interviews go? The officer interview(s) give the board a view of who you are beyond the stats.
    3) Back to #1, follow up and make sure your packet stays "active." My son went through the 4 year process twice -- with basically identical stats. He had PFTs in the 270-280 range, was 53rd in a class of around 1150, straight A's with AP classes, leadership with band and Young Marine program, etc. He trusted too much in the process in that he assumed all was good (based on limited feedback) after he didn't make the 1st board. After he didn't hear from the RS by May, he discovered that the original officer in charge of his packet had retired mid process -- hence limited feedback. His replacement looked at the paperwork and was somewhat perplexed at why it wasn't selected. The replacement worked closely with my son to make sure nothing was dropped -- and he received the scholarship during the early board while he was a 1st semester freshman in college. My point, and back to #1 -- keep involved.
    4) Just being realistic -- the 219 low score by itself raises a red flag -- not just because of the score. Look up leadership traits and principles. This process is VERY competitive. A question of whether you are truly prepared--not just physically--will be raised.
    5) It keeps coming back to being involved and getting feedback.

    Regardless of scores, interviews, boards, etc. -- always have alternate plans. Go for other scholarships, look into PLC program as well as the NROTC college program. If you want to be a Marine Officer, be prepared to go all in.
     
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  8. curious83

    curious83 Member

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    I am confused...My son had his paperwork completed before the first boards. This summer, he was able to max the pull ups and crunches. He joined cross country in the Fall to work on the run. While doing cross country, he didn't continue to do the pull-ups and crunches. He was able to score a 270 on the test, but only did 86 crunches. He took that test the end of October. When he didn't get picked at the first board, he started working on his crunches and was ready to retake his test. He had it scheduled with the recruiter for Christmas Eve. They called and told him it was too late to redo his PFT. Is that true? What should he do? The officer is telling him his application is very competitive. It is just really tough this year. I had hoped the extra 14 points from maxing the crunches would help. He is running winter track so his run time should be about the same...
     
  9. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    Curious: I think the 270 score is fine. Sounds like your DS is staying in touch (good) and that there is nothing he can do to update his package (too late). At this point, it is time to let the process take place and see what happens. Use the time to focus on other options, other commissioning programs and other scholarships. Best of luck to your DS.
     
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  10. rocatlin

    rocatlin Member

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    +1 USMCGrunt

    A 270 is good, and my opinion is that if they saw that he maxed the pullups and is a cross country runner -- the 14 point difference on crunches isn't a big deal.

    He is staying engaged in the process and all the info is downrange. If the recruiter needs anything else, it sounds like your son will take care of it.

    Focus on other options as stated.

    (And I know that it's an agonizing time for both parent and kid. It sounds like he wants to be a Marine Officer, so let that persistence work.)
     
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  11. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Agree with Grunt and rocatlin. 270 is a good score. As rocatlin said, even if a scholarship doesn't come through there are other alternatives to pursue including NROTC as a college programmer. That's the route my son took and he was finally able to win a scholarship that kicked in middle of sophomore year. He is now a 2nd Lt at TBS along with Grunt's DS. There is also PLC and OCS if that doesn't work out.
     
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