Math ACT and Whole Person Score

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Gatton18, Dec 19, 2012.

  1. Gatton18

    Gatton18 Member

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    I am a bit concerned about my math ACT score, which is a 29. I have a 36 english, and a 35 in science and reading (although USNA doesn't ask for them). I'm a Senior so it is too late to take the test again, and my last three out of four math ACT scores have been a 29 anyways. For some reason I can't get above a 29, even with weeks of studying.

    I have read that the math ACT score is the most heavily weighted item in the whole person score, which concerns me because my math score does not accurately reflect my actual math ability. Currently I have taken Calculus 1 and 2 at a University, with A's in both. Next semester I will be taking Calculus 3 and 4 at the same University. Will this make up for the lacking math ACT when it comes to the whole person score?

    I've attended a STEM based school since last school year, so my Junior and Senior transcript is largely math and science courses taken at a University, if this helps anyone answer my question.

    Thanks in advance for any help!
     
  2. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    Are you aware that the Jan SAT exam will be the last exam to be considered for the Class of 2017? I would suggest that you consider registering for that exam and get familiar with the SAT format, scoring, etc. You are correct in your understanding that math scores get the most attention at USNA, so if you can raise them it certainly will be to your advantage. Also, it is important to you that USNA will have a transcript of your Calc 1 and 2 grades as soon as it becomes available. Best wishes to you.
     
  3. John41057

    John41057 Member

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    ACT Score

    Hi
    I know the academies all like high math and science. But remember they look at a lot of other factors as part of the final competitive number they assign you. My DS had 28 math and 29 science and has an LOA and MOC. He was a highly drafted baseball player but he also had 18 units of college at a 3.95 GPA to help with lower high school grades. So depending on your grades in high school and college as well as sports, leadership, volunteer ECT, you may be just as competitive as anyone else. GOOD LUCK!!
    Regards
    John
     
  4. Gatton18

    Gatton18 Member

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    I was unaware that there was still a SAT exam date acceptable for this admissions cycle. I have not taken the SAT, but will look into it. Thanks for bringing this to my attention!

    I currently have 65 college credits and will be earning 23 more before graduation. Was your DS a high school or college applicant?
     
  5. John41057

    John41057 Member

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    College Credit

    Hi
    My DS was a high school applicant. He did not apply himself his freshman and sophomore year. When he got recruited at the end of his sophomore year for the USAFA he turned it around and his last two year grades have been great and he added college classes to make him more competitive. I know he was blessed to be a recruited athlete, but he has worked so very hard like the rest of you young people. Never give up!
    Regards
    John
     
  6. Whistle Pig

    Whistle Pig Banned

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    Nice encouragement and information to assist this hopeful.

    Still, the water gets enormously muddied comparing recruited athletes to others. Too often apples and oranges. The Mids know this.

    Also, while the OP might rightly proclaim that his 29 fails to represent his mathematical abilities and skills, USNA views the standardized math test score as the best available tool for assessing those, and that's why it traditionally has received nearly 1/5 of the weight for assessing this essential, key ability. It is the leveler of the "playing field" for candidates.

    The only point is to edify that no matter what a candidate's perceived reality, this is that for USNA admissions.

    And it's one of the illuminators for guiding candidates away from the dangerous cliff that 600 is the "qualifying" score. That's simply where they set the initial height for the high jump competition. And absent some major boosts ... like being a recruited jock, a targeted priority, out-of-sight measures in other areas (sorry, having a perfect 98.6 deg F temperature isn't one. :( ), in many or at least multiple other areas of the WP scoring variables ... well with 20,000 others in line for that spot ... it becomes a monumentally tough climb. It's realizing that all the variables do not carry equal weight. None comes close to the math standardized score. For the "average" candidate, it's almost essential to hit this well. Unless one hits, kicks, throws a ball better than nearly all.
     

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