Med School after ROTC?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by aviatordream, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. aviatordream

    aviatordream Member

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    Recently, I've actually been considering going to medical school once I graduate from an undergraduate college. And since there is no way I can pay for med school on my own at this point, I've been considering the military route for it. I am aware about HPSP and the military med school, but what about ROTC? I know that if I were to recieve a ROTC scholarship, I need to do service time. Are ROTC students allowed to go for the military paid med school slots like academy students? Any insight is appreciated, thanks.
     
  2. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    I won't comment on the ROTC side, as I'm not too familiar with how that works.

    However, my wife is a doctor. The good news for you is that pretty much NOBODY "pays" for medical school. It's too much. You're looking at around $150 to $200k in tuition. It's all done with loans. My wife didn't pay a dime out of pocket for med school (granted, we are paying out the nose now, but it's manageable). Just something to bear in mind.
     
  3. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    Yes, they are. An MSIV from my battalion is working on his now. How he's going about getting the slot? I really have no clue. I can try and get some insight from him, but all the terms and procedures he'll give me may be hard for you to understand, atleast as far as I'll be able to explain them.
     
  4. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    You can either request an ed delay when you access (pick your branch) or choose to go into the guard or reserves to fulfill your obligation so that you can attend medical school. There are no guarantees that your request for ed delay will be granted. Like everything, these slots are competitive. I think the number was about 200 that got ed delay last year, and the majority of those were for Medical or Law school. You need to talk to a ROO and the Health Care recruiter in your area to get all the facts. My advice is usually if you are dead set on being a Doc and will jump off a bridge if you can't go to med school after college you should be looking HSPS and coming up with a plan to pay for college. If you would be able to deal with having to serve for four years before returning to school go the ROTC route and work your butt off to earn an ed delay.
     
  5. patentesq

    patentesq Parent

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    aviatordream, what's wrong with branching aviation (I assume that interests you, given your user name), spending four years having incredible fun, and then using the GI Bill to help with med school, and then re-entering active duty as a medical officer? I know that 4 years seems like an "eternity" for a college student, but it really isn't. When you enter med school, you'll be more mature and that will result in higher grades. Plus, I think you'd be a better doc and have a more direct bed-side manner if you've "been there" with our troops.

    EDIT: Before scoutpilot takes me down mercilessly for having an inaccuracy in my post, I reminded myself that the service commitment for aviators is 6 years, not 4. Still, 6 years is not "eternity" if aviation is one of the life experiences that one hopes to accumulate before entering that "great PX in the sky."
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
  6. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    Public Service Loan Forgiveness

    Anyone pursuing medical school should know about Public Service Loan Forgiveness, which requires you to work 10 years for a 501c3 non-profit while making your loan payments (residency can count). Whatever balance is left after 10 years can be forgiven, for many students this would be more than $100,000.
     
  7. mariner116

    mariner116 Member

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    How much of a medical school education with the GI bill cover?
     
  8. patentesq

    patentesq Parent

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    I am not an expert on the GI Bill because I never really had to look into it. The program was not available to me in my day because I was an Army ROTC scholarship student for undergrad (scholarship students back then had to waive their GI Bill rights, but I understand that AROTC scholarship students and SA grads can avail themselves now of the post-911 GI Bill, which hopefully won't change).

    In any event, the GI Bill program is an enormous benefit for vets and unlikely to be cut (Congress on both sides of the aisle is loath to cut veteran benefits, but who knows). Here is the link to the website. Check out these numbers!! https://gibill.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1438/kw/1438 Here's the website for the Yellow Ribbon Program: http://www.gibill.va.gov/GI_Bill_Info/CH33/YRP/Yellow_ribbon.htm

    Let me also just say, though, that money should NOT be the guiding factor when choosing your career path.

    First, please understand that the medical profession is NOT just about money. Money will never will make you happy if you don't genuinely enjoy your job. In this respect, you shouldn't let the prospect of a higher salary steer you away from your dreams or into a particular career path. Do you genuinely want to "heal the sick"? Become a physician. Do cases like Gideon v. Wainright (ensuring that the poor has equal access to the courts) inspire you? Become a lawyer. Do you receive genuine job satisfaction in ensuring freedom in this country and putting tyrants in their place by placing "warheads on foreheads"? Become a career Apache helo pilot or Stealth fighter pilot. Do you want to teach our nation's youth during the most formative period of their lives? Become a teacher. You have only one life to live -- make the most of it.

    Second, assuming you are entering the profession for the right reasons, do some calculations and compare the salaries for docs against other professions and you'll conclude that entering the medical profession really can pay for itself over time. Here is some salary info for private-sector docs: http://www.studentdoc.com/medical-salary-expectations.html. If you factor the added income you will receive from obtaining an advanced degree, you will likely conclude that ANY education will pay for itself over time, despite the seemingly enormous financial hurdles that you THINK you are facing. In that sense, higher education really is FREE (sure, you have to borrow money at first, but you will earn that money back eventually).

    The good thing about going on active duty first is that it gives you more time to mature and decide what you REALLY want out of life. So many high school students think they want to be a doctor simply because Daddy is one or because they really like the TV Show "House". Those are often the ones who later find out they are miserable in their chosen career path. Serving on active duty first has the HUGE (albeit unmonetizable) benefit of enabling you to make better-informed decisions. And if you ultimately decide to follow a civilian career path, it also gives you the satisfaction of knowing that you have "done your part" for our country, something you will be proud of your entire life.

    This is actually what many of the soldiers I led on active duty have done. After high school, they were privates in the Infantry. Several are now thriving lawyers doing some really great things for people and truly enjoy the law. They appear to be very happy (at least from what I can discern from their regular Facebook updates).

    The program that paradoxer mentions above is really great because it enables folks who entered their professions for the right reasons to also pursue their dreams (so many law school grads, for example, want to help the poor but often can't because they become slaves to the "golden handcuffs" that law firms often provide).

    In short, if you genuinely want to heal the sick, follow that path regardless of the cost. That does not mean that your question was not a very good one, however. (I guess my post about "follow your dreams" is mainly aimed at the lurkers who are reading this thread and considering their "life after high school" options)
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2011

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