Medical issues on 2020 application

Discussion in 'Coast Guard Academy - USCGA' started by Rowers mom, Jun 2, 2015.

  1. Rowers mom

    Rowers mom New Member

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    Hi All, I just joined and posted a short intro, some of which is copied here:

    I have a rising senior who recently informed us that he wants to apply to CGSA for class of 2020. This was quite a surprise to us, as he hadn't expressed much interest in the military before this. (He later told me had to said much because he knew i wouldnt be crazy about the idea.). His dad is a former Marine, but never pushed our son towards the military. I admit that the military is not my choice, but I realize it's not my choice and it's not my life. I would never want to be instrumental in preventing him from realizing a dream just because of my fears. He is a great kid, strong character, loves to help and serve others and I think the CGSA would be lucky to have him. I'm biased, I know, but I do believe it.

    I feel as though we are coming to the whole service academy thing late. There is so much to consider. We visited the Academy on May 29 and he absolutely loved it. I've never seen him this excited about any of his previous college visits. One of our big questions has to do with possible medical disqualification. DS has ADHD and is on medication for it. He has read the literature and website which says ADHD is a disqualification. We get why and understand that to overcome this he has to be medication free for a year and show that he can still succeed academically. Is that all? How "successful" does he have to be?

    His last prescription covers May 2015. We have a June script that hasn't been filled and we spoke with his doc who said he would take it back and make a note in his medical file that his last prescription was May, not June. However, in the literature we received at the academy it says April 15 of senior year is the medical deadline for completing the DoDMERB exam. So, can I assume we missed the 1 year deadline by roughly 45 days? If so, how solid is that one year deadline?

    Second medical issue: DS is a rower and has a shoulder injury. It prevented him from rowing this past season. Fortunately, he was able to stay connected with the team and was appointed assistant coach for the novice boys program, but his injury is looking like it might need surgery (we meet with surgeon later this week.) so, any surgery to a major joint has to be at least 6 month old. Are there any other issues we should be aware of?

    Thanks for any insight you all may be able to offer. I'm sure we will also talk directly with someone from DoDMERB, but I'd welcome your thoughts.
     
  2. No1Fanof2

    No1Fanof2 Member

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    Hi, my kids are very involved with NJROTC at our high school. Thus some close classmates had these same issues come up past and present(ADHD). You are doing the right thing by getting him off the medication in order to pass the medical clearance. From what I understand past classmates who went off to college got off the meds and demonstrated they were able to function successfully with their courses in college. They did have to request a waiver. They participated in ROTC program in college and went into the service(some OCS route).

    None tried to reapply to the service academies, but one this year may after a year into college. From what I understand talking with a school counselor and parents, 504 accommodations are not disclosed, but if the child can remove the 504 accommodations (before their senior year) it is best. That is how it is suppose to work anyways. I only mention this because it is not uncommon to be diagnosed with ADHD be on the meds and have a 504 in place.

    I would not discourage him to go the route now, as long as he does not let his learning and grades suffer. He can always reapply, apply later, or go the ROTC route. Texas A&M has a T ASAP (Texas Armed Service Scholarship Program) that is available to kids on track to graduate.

    Definitely talk to DoMERD, if you have JROTC program at your high school the Instructors may be able to offer you more insight.

    Hopefully I have not given you bad information. This place is wealth of knowledge. Good luck!! I have 2020 hopeful too:)

    I would start to measure for "successful" by still meeting the requirements for the application standards for the academies, ROTC scholarship, or concurrent enrollment in a ROTC program. Of course shoot higher than minimums. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2015
  3. Rowers mom

    Rowers mom New Member

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    Thank you both for your replies. My son contacted the CGSA today and is waiting for more info.

    A big concern is what being off ADHD medicine will do to his grades. I agree, it could have a negative impact on his plan B admission options. We are debating and weighing our options right now. Trying to get as much info as we can to help us make our decisions.
     
  4. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    From what has been posted in the past they will want to see no difference in his grades while off the meds. The one year mark I believe is a hard and fast rule. So if he doesn't make the cut off to get a waiver for the class of 2020, then he might have to do a year of school elsewhere. Sometimes that is a blessing in disguise for a lot of kids, especially as he adjusts to college level work off his meds. As many say the SAs are a marathon, not a sprint. For some it's just a marathon, for others it's a double marathon or even an iron man in a strong current, hilly course, in a humid, rainy, hot location! Good luck.
     
    CAmom2015 likes this.

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