Medications at NASS?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Sneak, May 30, 2016.

  1. Sneak

    Sneak Member

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    I looked at the documentation they sent me for NASS but I couldn't find any information about this.

    Am I allowed to take my prescribed medications with me to NASS? I just take an antihistamine for allergies and an antibiotic for acne, both of which I can go without for a week if I have to. But there were no instructions for turning in medications and it said that people with diabetes and such can't even go to the summer seminar, which is what makes me suspicious.

    Does anyone know how this works?
     
  2. AJC

    AJC Member

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    Take them with you. Best if they are in the bottle with the pharmacy label. They may hold onto them but you will be able took take them at the prescribed intervals.
    You probably have to fill out a form of some kind.
     
  3. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    Diabetes is a disqualifying condition for accession to military service, in general, hence the specific mention.
     
  4. Sneak

    Sneak Member

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    Yeah I know, I was just using that as an example of the wording from the instructions.
     
  5. LongAgoPlebe

    LongAgoPlebe Member

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    Prescriptions are doctors' orders, and right now only your doctor is familiar with your medical history and care. USNA isn't in any position (right now!) to determine whether you should or shouldn't have them because you are not in the Navy yet. Plan to take them in their containers with the pharmacy label on them. You might also call the contact number in your materials and ask them whether you should also bring a written prescription, but since neither one is a controlled or potentially dangerous drug, that is probably overkill.
     

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