Mile time and running

Discussion in 'Publicly and Privately Funded Military Colleges' started by RancidRancid, Oct 24, 2011.

  1. RancidRancid

    RancidRancid Member

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    Hey guys, I've been working on my running for college (texas a&m, norwich, citadel, VMI) and was wondering if any of you could offer some advice.
    Today I ran a mile in about 17 mins (with some change). I feel as though it's my legs that give out before my lungs or heart. I could go so much farther and longer if my legs let me, namely my calves. They just get worn out.

    What can I do to improve my mile time and improve my running abilities?
    Thanks :smile:
     
  2. solon

    solon Member

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    You might need to include some strength training to your workout. Runners lift to build muscle and speed. Maybe you could start with deep knee lunges with light weights (like 10 pounds). Try several reps of 20. But make sure you keep your knee directly over your toes. Squats are good too but not sure how to explain good form. I'm not super fast but I've shaved 30 seconds off the mile since I took the PPFT this summer. I'm applying to VMI too. Keep me posted. Would be cool to meet a fellow Rat.
     
  3. bjkuds

    bjkuds Parent

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    DS ran 40-60 yard sprints in sets of 5 15-30 seconds in between then a 2 min rest and do it again X3. That will increase your pace from a jog to a run when you go for distance. you have a lot of time to cut off, but you have the time to do it. See how fast you can run a half mile. work on getting that closer to a 6 min mark then add distance to it and keep the same pace. good luck
     
  4. pennak

    pennak Member

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    First, consult a doctor and make sure that you are fit enough to start training. Second, consult a exercise pro who can develop a program for you. The risk is that if you over do it, you'll get hurt. You have a ways to go -- can't do it over night. Kudos for recognizing the issue and addressing it. FWIW, to pass the VMI running test, you will need to do 1.5 miles in 12:30. And don't forget the situps and the pullups as well.
     
  5. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    A useful link for training can be found here. I tlays out a good 10 week training program for getting you ready:

    http://www.vmi.edu/content.aspx?id=2414
     
  6. RancidRancid

    RancidRancid Member

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    Thanks for all of your advice guys. I know I have a lot of work to do, but I have the time to improve. All the cadets I've been talking to (norwich and texas a&M) have told me some people even show up barely even in shape (not something I want to do).

    Something tells me your Cadre aren't going to let you be failing any PT tests... I know I wouldn't want to be the rat, or fish, or knob, or rook, that fails a PT test...

    Im also under the impression that at all these schools, you PT so much, whether with your outfit or with ROTC, that you improve in running and sit ups and push ups etc. anyway. I just don't want to make my first few weeks at any of these schools more difficult than I know its going to be.

    thanks again, any more advice appreciated :smile:
     
  7. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Sound reasoning there. the best thing you can do for yourself is to use the time between now and matriculation (that 's a lot of time!) IMHO regardless of what school you wind up at- will be to adopt a regular running program so that 3-5 miles is your norm. You don't have to be a sprinter or a Marathoner- but you should be able to comfortably run moderate distances. Similarly- just have a daily regimen of Pushups, situps etc.. You will save yourself a lot of unnecessary grief - and it won't be as personally painful to you! You have more than 6 months- you can literally transform yourself in that amount of time, but you don't have to go overboard- just establish a routine.
     
  8. robinhood17

    robinhood17 USMA Cadet

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    Keep up the determination!

    When I started cross country this season, It was daunting to hear we would be running 10+ miles.

    I run it easily now, and it has been merely a couple of months.


    When I run, sometimes I imagine myself running in formation at an academy,rotc, etc...and when I get that feeling of "I should slow down and stop" I think "how bad do you want it?"

    Definitely makes me kick it up a notch.

    In six months, anything is possible, and you can definitely do it! :smile:

    Please just be careful not to push too hard,too fast. you will get injured, which will take nearly that long to heal.

    A good goal is to increase 10% a week,and no hard impact running in week three of training (most likely to get injured this week.) also remember, it doesnt particularly matter if you a 6 minute miler. what matters is that you didn't quit. :smile:

    Good luck!
     
  9. RahVaMil2009

    RahVaMil2009 Member

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    Most of the advice I can provide on improving your run time can be found in the Getting in Shape thread. You'll have to sort through posts on pushups, situps, pullups, and other exercises, but there's a lot of good stuff about running discussed there.

    Much of physical training is mental. When it begins to burn, you think you've reached your max, so you stop. While you need to pay attention to signals like that (there's a difference between hurting and being hurt), it's also important to keep pushing. Your body is capable of a lot more than your mind thinks it is.

    There are a lot of great resources out there on the internet to help you design the workout plan that will work best for you. Spend some time reading about what it takes to get in shape and looking at some of the recommended beginner's running plans, talk to your doctor and coach(es), design your program, and stick to it.

    I'm not trying to discourage you, but if you're currently running a mile in 17+ minutes, you have a lot of work to do in a limited amount of time. Don't overestimate the amount of time you have. Treat every workout like it's your last big one before you become a fish, rat, knob, or whatever other option you choose.

    The biggest mistake I made before going to VMI was thinking that I had more time to get into shape than I really did. I definitely got in shape once I got there, but in retrospect, I'm really lucky I didn't end up with a stress fracture or another serious injury like some of my Brother Rats. I should have been stronger and faster when I arrived.

    Hope this helps.

    Jackie M. Briski
    VMI Class of 2009
     

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