More AIM questions

Discussion in 'Coast Guard Academy - USCGA' started by oliviachang2866, Jun 26, 2012.

  1. oliviachang2866

    oliviachang2866 New Member

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    I am fully confident that I can handle the physical side of AIM but it's the mental side that is bothering me. To anyone who has experienced AIM, what was going through your mind the whole time?
    Also about how many miles did you run every day and was there any time for bathroom breaks? And what your best/worst memory of AIM? (just curious)
     
  2. awl13188

    awl13188 Member

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    I went to AIM this past summer. It was a complete culture shock for me. I thought I'd be ready since I also went to USAFA Summer Seminar and was expecting the same sort of deal. I was wrong. USCGA has Swab Summer (boot camp) going on at the same time, and you basically do the same thing as them for the first half of AIM.

    From the moment you arrive at the Academy, the yelling and whatnot starts. The entire first day is not fun. You move into the dorms, get yelled at, learn basic commands, do pushups, get yelled at some more. Simply put, the next two days comprise of times where you are being yelled at and times where you aren't. For example: You'll get to do one activity at one location (no yelling), then move to another location (yelling), and arrive at the location for the next activity (no yelling). Yelling times are basically in the morning, between afternoon events, and at night. Yelling times include physical activity as "punishment". Yelling times are not limited to AIM cadres; all cadres can yell at you.

    Long story short, the first half of AIM is mentally and physically tough. HOWEVER, there was never a moment where I felt worried. The cadres are extremely professional; there's no personal attacks, no hazing, nothing unreasonable. They will make sure you are healthy, fed properly, drink enough water, get enough sleep, etc. And during chill times they're quite friendly and will answer your questions, pass down advice, etc. Yes, there's tons of time for bathroom breaks. There's a huge emphasis on hydration so they'll allow you to use the bathroom every chance you get near one. You can also ask the use the restroom, and you're allowed to use the restroom at your own free will during chill times.

    The second half of AIM is a blast. Everything changes on the day that falls in the middle between the first and second half of AIM. The cadres are totally cool about everything, you get to eat and walk normally, take pictures, poke fun at military bearing, get to know the people around you, and all that. The lesson (that I got at least) is that it's tough but rewarding. Very rewarding. I was mentally and physically pushed to my limits. There were times where I didn't believe in myself, but the cadres still pushed me. And most importantly, it gave me the most realistic taste of service academy life and whether or not it was for me. No recruiting, no sugarcoating, no BS.

    I ran about 3-5 miles a day, not to prepare for AIM, but just out of habit. I went into AIM much like you did: more worried about the mental side than the physical side. I was totally shocked the first day or so, but you get used to it during the later days. Best memory of AIM is the laughter. Tons of laughing during the second half of AIM. Everything is funny since nobody was able to laugh for the first half. Worst memory is waking up. They sound a bugle, you get little time to get up, and the yelling begins. You'll do fine as long as you don't allow quitting to be an option. I went in without a clue, hated it in the beginning, told myself that I would finish what I started, and AIM ended up one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. Just take it step by step; I worked meal to meal and just told myself I'd get to the next meal.
     
  3. oliviachang2866

    oliviachang2866 New Member

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    Thanks! That helped a lot.
     

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