Motivation

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by ALE12, Mar 22, 2014.

  1. ALE12

    ALE12 New Member

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    Hello Everyone :smile:

    I just wanted to share my journey with DoDMERB with the hope that it will motivate and encourage those seeking to obtain a waiver.

    Ever since I was a sophomore in high school I was determined to attend a service academy, specifically AFA. From that moment I began stocking up my resume with leadership activities and signing up for advanced classes. I worked incredibly hard in school and was accepted into AFA summer seminar. After attending summer seminar I was even more convinced that the AFA was my dream school. I received a nomination from my state senator and representative. Also, after speaking with my ALO and administration at AFA, I felt confident due to their assurance that I was a qualified applicant. Unfortunately, several weeks after my appointment with DoDMERB I was notified that I was medically disqualified. I was extremely confused since the disqualification resulted from anxiety/depression medication I had taken three years earlier. Since then, I had not had any mediation and had excelled in school/extra-cirriclar activities. I worked and worked towards obtaining a waiver. Unfortunately, when March approached I was not accepted due to my DQ. I was crushed and had to start figuring out Plan B. I knew I wanted to be an officer in the Air Force so instead of giving up, I began looking at AFROTC. This past fall I enrolled in my University's AFROTC program. The DQ was still on my record and it worried me since I knew it needed to be removed before the end of my sophomore year. I worked incredibly hard in ROTC and academically. I joined drill team, silver wings, and was very involved in my detachment. I improved my PFA score from a 92.4 to a 98. About three weeks ago, cadre in my detachment notified me that they chose me to be nominated for a scholarship due to my major and hard work. However, they were unable to submit my application while I was medically DQ'd. From that moment, I began working with DoDMERB consultants (which I recommend everyone look into, extremely helpful) to obtain a medical waiver. I gathered a packet of information that included a self-written letter, recommendation letters from my ROTC captain and mentor, resume, school transcript, and awards. I sent this letter to DoDMERB in hopes that it would prove that I was a happy confident cadet who could handle the stresses of ROTC and that past medical problems were not an issue. In addition to my packet, cadre at my detachment spoke directly with the waiver authority and were interviewed because they believed I deserved to be medically qualified. Yesterday, I was notified that I am now medically qualified and my scholarship application was submitted. After such a long nerve wracking process, I finally received the news I have always hoped for. My relief and happiness could not be expressed.

    I share my experience in order to encourage everyone to not give up! Maybe things don't work out the first time around, but if its really your dream keep pursuing it. I worked incredibly hard to obtain a waiver and enrolled in ROTC despite the risk knowing that I might not become medically qualified before the end of my sophomore year. Persistence is key!
     
    Momof3gr&xys and Whales like this.
  2. 2018Class

    2018Class Member

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    ALE12, your story is inspirational. Congratulations on getting the DQ removed because of your hard work and determination. I hope you get the scholarship. It certainly sounds like you deserve it.

    I figured that a medical disqualification was the end of the road. It sounds like in certain instances the door might not be closed.
     
  3. paulycowgirl

    paulycowgirl ProudMomPaulycowgirl

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    Where do you find a DODMERB consultant?


    Sent using the Service Academy Forums® mobile app
     
  4. ALE12

    ALE12 New Member

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    Go to google and type dodmberb consultants and it should be the first link. For some reason it will not let me directly copy and paste the link.

    I highly recommend! Extremely helpful, the consultant use to be the head of DoDMERB and therefore has a lot of expertise.
     
  5. rossandrea

    rossandrea New Member

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    ALE12, thank you. Last night we just learned our daughter was Dq'd for exactly the same reason. She was also crushed. I applaud both you and her for doing the right thing to take care of yourselves and not ignoring your medical needs. You are an inspiration for my daughter, andwe will work with her for a waiver as well. One day the system will not punish those who seek appropriate medical care for mental health issues. All the best.
     
  6. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    I was glad to see a successful journey laid out, a testimony to hard work and perseverance.

    I don't believe "the system" is trying to punish anyone. It's not personal. The pre-active duty screening process sets a very high bar for a broad range of physical and mental factors, because the goal is to bring in those who will be in the best situation to be and remain world-wide deployable in an all-volunteer force. It's a utilitarian approach: the good of the many outweighs the good of a few.

    Many conditions produce a DQ for coming into the military. If these conditions emerge after coming on active duty, military medicine does its darnedest to treat the problem and restore the person to health, using a Medical Review Board and medical separation/retirement as a last resort.

    I wish all those who are DQed the best of luck in the waiver process.
     
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  7. rossandrea

    rossandrea New Member

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    CAPT MJ, greatly appreciate your reply. From the perspective of young adults who wish to serve, it is very personal. Perhaps one day the accession process can be changed to perform all of this in a tighter cycle of decision making with those diagnoses that are perpetually challenged addressed up front (e.g., asthma), with less stress on the candidate. It can only be to the benefit of the Services. Regards, rossandrea
     
  8. WorkforJesus

    WorkforJesus Member

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    Thank you so much for this motivation I am afraid I might be facing a DQ myself.
     
  9. matty

    matty Member

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    Made my day -- thanks for sharing!
     

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