Multiple Nominations

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by eboyd, Jan 18, 2012.

  1. eboyd

    eboyd Member

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    Is there a statistic of multiple nomination winners each year? Are the majority of appointments given to multiple nomination winners?
     
  2. ctuma2

    ctuma2 Member

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    In a state such as California, where I live, multiple nominations are rare. Because of the large population, if a candidate receives a nomination from a representative, the representative calls the senators and lets them know that so and so got a rep nom and the senators do not consider the candidate anymore because they see it as a spot that someone else can have. So at least for CA, if there are any appointments, the majority of them will not be from multiple nominations.
     
  3. eboyd

    eboyd Member

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    Well I wasnt necessarily just referring to MOC nominations, but rather an MOC nomination + AFROTC/Presidential etc.
     
  4. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    First; there aren't any actual stats of multiple nominations vs appointments. At least none that I've seen. Also, certain nominations like Presidentials, are pretty much automatic nominations. On average, at least in the past, there were around 500+ presidential nominations. As long as your parent(s) are currently active duty for more than 8 years, or they are retired military, a similar point systems for guard/reserve, the applicant automatically gets a presidential nomination. The thing is however, no more than 100 appointments can be given using the presidential nomination. But in reality, just about everyone who has a presidential, is also applying for a MOC nomination. So having 2 nominations isn't really that impressive. It just gives you more than one slate to compete against.

    Now, concerning MOC nominations, that a little different story. Because of the large number of applicants and the very few nominations by a MOC, having multiple nominations does impose the human factor among board members. What I mean by that is; it's only natural for a board member to wonder WHY a specific applicant would receive more than one MOC nomination. As others have said, most MOC's communicate with each other and try to maximize the number of individuals who receive a nomination and are therefor competitive. If a person receives more than one MOC nomination, there's usually only one of 2 reasons. 1) There are very few applicants in that state/district, so certain applicants might have more than one MOC nomination in order to fill a MOC's slate. 2) A particular applicant actually walks on water. So the human nature of a board member when they see an applicant with more than 1 MOC nomination is: "WHY?" If they see the individual is from a small populated state like Wyoming; and there's more nominations than applicants; it might not pull too much weight. However; they may look at the Multi-Nominated individual as the "Best of the Litter". From a large state, an individual with multiple nominations may be seen as someone who probably is much better than most/all of their state/district competitors. And the MOC's are saying that this individual really needs to be looked at more closely.

    Something to remember however: If a particular applicant is THAT GOOD, and they "Walk on Water", the MOC has the option of presenting their slate of nominees with a "PRINCIPAL" nominee as the #1 slot. In which case, it doesn't matter if the academy wants this person or not. Doesn't matter if they "Prefer" a different candidate from that state/district. If that applicant who is listed as a "Principal" nominee is "QUALIFIED" to air force standards, then the academy MUST give that individual an appointment. They have no choice. And that is what I actually prefer MOCs do. If they really believe an individual is the "Best of the Best of the Best" of those applying, then instead of giving them 2-3 nominations, have 1 MOC make him/her their "Principal" nominee and save all the other nominations for others so they can compete for the other state slots, or compete in the national pool. But again, no, there are no stats that show multi-nominations vs appointments.
     
  5. eboyd

    eboyd Member

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    Thank you for your answer, Christcorp. I suppose the basis of my question was whether or not having multiple nominations from a competitive state was benefecial in any way other than offering more slates upon which to compete. You did a good job of answering that as well
     
  6. Tiger28

    Tiger28 New Member

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    MA Nomination

    I am from MA and have received a nomination from both Senators (so two nominations total.) Is there any way to tell if I am the "Principal" nominee from either of their offices?
     
  7. Blackbird

    Blackbird Parent

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    The MOC determines the type of nomination. You could simply call and ask the MOC staffer who is designated the Service Academy Coordinator. They would be glad to tell you what type of nomination you have received. Some MOC's use the term "Primary" for the Principal nomination. So don't get confused by that. . .
     
  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Have you received your nom letter yet? Usually an MOC will state after "Congrats" the system they used.

    Honestly, even if they don't say the system and use Principal/Primary, there would be a little blurb to acknowledge that you were the Prin. in their selection.

    Your ALO may also be a way to find out. ALO's are regional, and due to this fact they may know which process the MOC uses.

    Principal typically is about 30% of all noms.
     

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