Multiple Offers-How'd They do it?

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by dlee96, Sep 24, 2012.

  1. dlee96

    dlee96 Member

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    How do candidates receive multiple offers from the SAs (USMA, USAFA, USNA, USMMA)? In my state (Michigan), I can only receive a nomination to ONE SA, and ONE SA only (my MOCs work w/ each other to only allow one nom/SA :mad:, according to a admissions forum I went too)
    Is there a majority of multiple-offer candidates in some states opposed to others? :confused:
     
  2. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    A simple answer is by applying to all of them

    It is possible to get an "offer" without a nomination.

    Don't believe everthing you hear as sometimes Senators and House members don't coordinate. What does the nomination application form say?
     
  3. bpu

    bpu Member

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    Short answer is don't take "No" for an answer.

    As just posted, many offices say they coordinate but don't. Both (really 3) congressional offices all need to have organized staff to intentionally avoid duplicate nominations. If one office is disorganized, second nominations can slip out. (Has happened). Also, if you make a compelling case on why two nominations are warranted a second or third nomination may intentionally be made.

    Second, inside one rep/senator's office they can give multiple noms despite what is said at a MOC orientation session. "If you do not list USXX #1 on your preference list then you will not get a nomination there." USXX wasn't listed #1, it was explained well why that was the case, and a compelling case was made to get a nom to USXX despite being listed #2. #1 and #2 choices both ended up with nominations.

    It can happen but only for good reason and only if explained well. Rules are rules, except when.... well, when the rules are really more like "guidelines".
     
  4. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    one more thing

    Unless you live in a super district, not likley your MOC will have enough applicants for all SAs to limit his or her nomination to 10.

    I have been serving on my MOC's nomination board for several years, other than Naval Academy., we never filled 10 nominations per vacancy for other SAs. At the end of the day, the board rank orders applicants and less than 10 wants nomination to a SA, all of them got it. No reason to not give the nomination, as without being 3Qed, nomination is useless.
     
  5. BigNick

    BigNick Member

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    My understanding is this -
    A MOC can nominate whoever they want for whatever reason they want. They can completely legally give a candidate a nomination to all three service academies - this is perfectly legal if that is what the MOC wants to do.
    The candidate can then be accepted and offered admission by all three schools. Some MOCs will just give a person a nomination to one school but that is ther choice,
     
  6. 2Steaktacos

    2Steaktacos Member

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    Can you tell of a situation that would be a compelling case?
     
  7. dlee96

    dlee96 Member

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    Well, the head staffer from the MOCs office came to the forum and said that they will NOT give double noms to any academy. Therefore, only one nom and one nom only will be given to the candidate should he receive a nom. I live in a district where the RC said was very competitive. I live in Oakland County (Metro-Detroit area)
     
  8. aseanag

    aseanag Eagle2013

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    If applicants qualify for Presidential nominations they could receive one for each academy.
     
  9. bpu

    bpu Member

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    A compelling case? Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. A candidate who has done much research, spoken with many people, and his or her desire to serve his or her country is paramount and the color of the uniform is secondary. A candidate who has attended a summer seminar or two, perhaps made a visit during the school year but not yet an overnight visit during the academic year but has those planned. A cadet who states, articulately, that research continues on what type of career the candidate wants to have from age 23-30 but it is difficult for a 17 to know definitively what the answer is by October senior year of high school and pleads for a little more time to make sure the best decision is made.

    Undoubtedly with nomination application numbers up for the class of 2017, including highly qualified candidates, this is a more difficult road than in prior years. From state to state and district to district, your mileage WILL vary.

    If you have done your homework and research already your chances are slim. If you have not yet done any homework or research by the time your MOC committee interviews you and you request more time by asking for multiple nominations then the odds are closer to none than slim.

    Best advice is to do as much research as possible in advance so that you are not torn between more than one academy. That eliminates the need for multiple nominations.
     
  10. BigNick

    BigNick Member

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    The law does not restrict the MOC in any way in the nomination process. They can nominate anyone they want for any reason they deem appropriate. The vast majority - perhaps all of them - try to get the best candidates in WP.

    Of course, a nomination is just one step and does not get a candidate an offer. A candidate must be 3Qd (pass physical exam, PT test, and be deemed qualified by WP) and get a nomination before they are eligible to get an offer.
    As detailed in other threads on this board, even being 3Qd with a nomination does not guarantee an offer. Normally only about 50-60% of the people fully qualified will get an offer as there are fewer slots than fully qualified candidates.

    It is a tough process but do not be discouraged. About 1200 young men and women make it successfully through the selection process every year.
     

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