Multiple schools

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by PaulRichards, Apr 27, 2010.

  1. PaulRichards

    PaulRichards New Member

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    Is it harder to get the ROTC sholarship depending on how prestigous the school? For example, is the scholarship easier to get at UCF than let's say Georgia tech? Thanks
     
  2. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    There are no hard statistics out there to answer this question, unfortunately.

    The best way to determine your "chances" at any one school is to talk to the ROO, go over the relevant information (the stuff that goes into your application) and ask how that compares to this year's scholarship recipients. While they are CC, they have a decent idea of how your resume compares to the current crop and should give you an idea of how you stack up. We were advised of this at a couple schools.

    That being said, every year is different and with the increase in applicants and decrease in the number of scholarships available this year, most of these appraisals were not particularly accurate.
     
  3. PaulRichards

    PaulRichards New Member

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    Thanks, if I might add, if I don't get the scholarship, just enroll in college in ROTC classes and do well, I can apply for the last 3 years correct?
     
  4. aglages

    aglages Parent

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    Yes, you can apply for an in-college scholarship. However those are also reportedly becoming scarce and more difficult to receive. Your college ROTC cadre will be ale to give you a better idea of what to expect.
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I agree with aglages regarding the scarcity. You need to understand that cadets who receive the 4 yr scholarship for IS has the right to convert it to the 3 yr for OOS. That means as a freshman they are not contracted yet, but have already been awarded the 3 yr scholarship. For the freshman who did not get a scholarship, but is applying for the 3 yr, they have to hope that enough of the freshman do not contract come sophomore yr.

    ROTC has a budget like any company. They have to work within their budget. If 90% of the freshman contract for a 3 yrr, that means they have less funds to give to the freshman applying for the 3 yr, thus it becomes more competitive.

    Since you are asking for a response regarding schools, I am assuming you are going Army or Navy, not AF, because the AF scholarship requires to state which colleges you are applying to, however, it has no true effect, since the AFROTC scholarship can be taken to any college that is on their list. The Army and Navy, if I am correct is tied to that college. I would suggest starting a thread asking that question for your particular branch.

    However, if it is AF, I just answered it because the school is not a "true" player in the decision process.
     
  6. PaulRichards

    PaulRichards New Member

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    Thanks, and I'm trying for AROTC, I talked to a local recruiter who brought up joining the reserves, and just taking ROTC classes in college, The reserves would pay for school, and I'd finish up my commitment after school, active or reserve, but to be honest I'd rather go straight through the ROTC scholarship, so I went to my guidance counseler to get more info, who gave me a number to call, who ended up being the number for the recruiter I talked to. Really just not an easy scholarship to find info on, since my school gas no JROTC
     
  7. moznick007

    moznick007 Member

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    PR: my son just went through all this; I would suggest you take a look at the Army ROTC web site. When you apply for AROTC,, you do need to list schools, and the scholarship you get will be tied to one or more of those schools. If it ends up being tied to a school you subsequently do not want to enroll in, or to which you are not accepted, you can ask that the scholarship be transferred to a school that has an open slot. However, with the desireability of these scholarships, as you can see from reading these threads there are many with scholarships but no open slots to the schools they want to go to.

    I am not inclined to believe that the Army considers your merit for a scholarship based upon the "name" of the school. I have no inside knowledge on this, but would believe the Army would love to have graduates from top schools enter their service; I can tell you that son recieved AROTC scholarship to three schools, one low cost, one middle of the pack (approx. $25000) and one at about $36000. Note too, that alot of schools include room and board, making the AROTC (and other ROTC) scholarships virtually a free ride (except for the committment!!!!!!)

    The other posters are correct, that AFROTC scholarships are not tied to any schools, so long as the school has the major to which the scholarship is tied, as many are. Some AFROTC scholarships are not tied to any particular major, and those litterally can be used at any school. Their downside is that they do not generally pay as much--the type 2 and type 7 have maximum limits on them.

    Didn't mean to carry on. Good luck as you learn about the scholarships. They can be a good deal, and there is lots to learn on these forums. Son would have used his AFROTC scholarship but for appointment to USAFA. Good luck.
     
  8. PaulRichards

    PaulRichards New Member

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    Thanks a lot, hopefully I can get my hands on a scholarship, and congratulations on your sons acceptance to USAFA, now all I have to worry about is athletics, since my school has no sports teams.
     
  9. House06

    House06 Member

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    Regarding AROTC: instead of talking to a local recruiter who will be trying to do their job- as already suggested gather information from the ROTC website and call some local/regional ROTC programs in your area. The ROO ( Recruiter Officer) is the best person to speak to. They are really really busy right now with end of year activities and scholarship process. So it may take a little bit for response. Do some research and then ask specific questions. Alot of your questions can be answered if you do an information search right here.

    Sports: If your school does not have sports programs, then you need to get involved with community/recreational/club sports immediately. Not sure but it sounds like you have not participated in organized sports programs before. If this is the case, then perhaps you should consider a running club. Not much skill is needed( to begin with) just lots and lots of practice. Also, you will need to be in good running shape for PT anyway. After you have started a running program, participate in local 5k races. With luck and lots and lots of practice, you will place, maybe win races which will show sports participation.

    Also, if you school does not have a sports program, consider starting a running club. So, that you have others to run with- stay in shape, and shows leadership- initiative( two others things you also need to be competitive for ROTC scholarships)

    Hope this helps and be feel free to visit this forum often and ask questions. There are many, many informed students and parents who can help you.

    Best of luck to you!
     
  10. cjs

    cjs Member

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    Another great person to speak with is the ROTC advisor for your area.

    Go to this page, http://www.goarmy.com/rotc/index.jsp and on the left side of the page do the "speak with ROTC advisor" and select your state.

    The person that I got in touch with last August was just the greatest. Our advisor was there every step of the way and hands on with answers and help. Phone calls, emails, everything was always answered and help was always offered.
     

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