Multiple Senatorial Nominations?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Evan711, Oct 21, 2014.

  1. Evan711

    Evan711 Member

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    Hi all,

    I was notified a few weeks ago that I have an interview with a board representing one of my senators. I never heard back from my other senator, however, and his notifications began last Friday, or at least that's what his website indicates. So now I am wondering if it is only possible to end up on one senator's slate. I always thought you could end up on multiple.

    On another note, does anyone have a guess as to how many candidates may have been selected to interview for the 10 spots on the senator's slate?

    Thank you for your time.
    Evan
     
  2. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Depends entirely on the state in which you live and how your Senator handles interviews. In some states, there may be <10 people who even apply for a nom. In others, there will be >600.

    Some MOCs interview everyone; most interview some smaller subset. Some do no interviews at all (base it all on "paper").

    Also, in some states, the MOCs get together so that a candidate only gets one nom period, or one nom to each SA, in total. Sometimes, only the MOCs of the same party get aligned. In some states, each MOC chooses the "best" and folks can end up with 3 noms.
     
  3. Evan711

    Evan711 Member

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    Thank you, usna1985. I live in Florida so I'm sure there is a very large number of applications...
     
  4. mdn18

    mdn18 Member

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    Move to North Dakota or Wyoming and you'll increase your chances :thumb:
     
  5. clind13290

    clind13290 Member

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    Hi all-

    Wanted to clarify how selection of MOC slate works. My DD rec'd a nom from one of senators, for which we are extremely grateful. She interviewed with other senator and congresswoman and waiting to hear with fingers crossed. In the event that she's fortunate enough to get a second nom, how does the slate selection work? Is she competing with the other 10 (assuming 10 nom per MOC) candidates on each slate independently? What I'm thinking is that if our senator has 1 slot available on her slate and gives out 10 nom from 300 applicants and our congresswoman has 1 slot and gives out 10 nom from 25 applicants (assuming less competitive slate), then my DD odds are better for the congresswoman's nom. Am I thinking about this correctly?

    Thanks!
     
  6. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Not quite. You are correct that she competes on each slate independently. I wouldn't make assumptions on the competitiveness of the slates, at least based on how many applicants there were. Of course now I'm sort of going to contradict that because the Senate slate IS generally more competitive because of the larger STATEWIDE pool vs the smaller congressional district. I guess you're right but my issue is with how you explain it. It's not the numbers per se. For example, let's assume the top 10 people in the state are also in your congressional district and are on the slates of both the Senator and the Congressman... so the slates are equally competitive.

    Hope this helps!
     
  7. TV4caster

    TV4caster Member

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    From what we were told by the nominating coordinator for the MOC our D interviewed with, it works like this: each MOC nominates 10. In some states kids get multiple nominations. In others (like VA) they like to "spread the wealth" because there are so many qualified applicants. If your child gets 2 nominations there will be 1 kid chosen from each slate. The other 9 kids off each slate will get put into a big pool of candidates and the Academy will arrange the leftover kids in order according to how many points they assigned each one based on their application strength.

    They then go down the list in order and choose however many slots went unfilled. That means the #5 kid from State X could get in over the #2 kid from State Y.

    Since it isn't like the NBA lottery where the more ping pong balls you have in the hopper, the better chance you have, your child will have the same chance as having just 1 nomination.

    The coordinator said that the only way having two nominations helps you is if you have a Presidential and a Congressional. I'm not sure why but that is what she said. Apparently there are 2 separate pools with those two types.
     
  8. clind13290

    clind13290 Member

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    Thanks very much! My explanation was likely not the best. The heart of my question is really if each slate is treated independently. I completely see and understand you point- fewer candidates doesn't necessarily = less qualified candidates. I'm thinking purely of odds and the numbers game. Assuming the MOC review boards did a reasonable job screening for the senators and congresswoman alike, selection of 10 out of a pool of 300 is going to be more competitive than 10 out of 25. Obviously the whole thing falls apart if the 2 best candidates in the entire state are in that 25. Thanks again.
     
  9. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    +1 to TV4caster's explanation of what happens after the independent competition on each slate is resolved.
     
  10. clind13290

    clind13290 Member

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    Thanks very much. Good luck to all.
     

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