NASS & Acceptance?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Stage4survivor, Feb 3, 2010.

  1. Stage4survivor

    Stage4survivor Member

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    My twin sons have applied for NASS but, are undecided about attending if accepted.
    I have encouraged them to attend if only as a part of the whole college application experience.
    If they attend I would expect the academy to be supportive and encouraging as well.
    Does the NASS impact at all the acceptance process should they decide to seek appointments?
     
  2. MJOmom

    MJOmom Member

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    "I expect the Academy to be supportive as well" ... what does that mean?
    My understanding of summer seminar is to give attendees a hint of what it's like to be a midshipman. As the mom of a plebe, I must tell you that midshipmen are expected to be tough, mature and resilient -- no sympathy shown at all. It's not the Academy's job or intent to "convince" anyone to come. My son's classmate attended summer seminar and learned he did NOT like being yelled at, being forced to march around and generally ignored. He is now at another school, on an ROTC scholarship ... The Academy is a tough place. Just know that going in.
     
  3. Stage4survivor

    Stage4survivor Member

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    Supportive?
    The academy has a vested interest in producing officers out of those they feel have the necessary qualities to lead men.
    Is it tough? No doubt but, it's also the TEAM concept, you're only as strong as your weakest link.
     
  4. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Let me try to tackle this . . . first, if your sons have ANY interest in attending USNA and are accepted for NASS, they absolutely should attend. The ONLY reason they should not attend is if they cannot financially afford to do so or if they have some unexpected injury/schedule change that makes it impossible to attend. NASS is intended to help potential candidates decide whether USNA is for them and to have them go back to their schools and neighborhoods and talk up USNA. To be perfectly honest, it is really not smart to decline NASS from your perspective.

    From an admissions perpective, NOTHING BAD happens if you decline. If you attend and do well, it can result in a small boost, not huge.

    I really don't understand this comment. NASS is not plebe summer. It is, however, intended to give kids an idea of what life at USNA is like. I always tell candidates: If you love NASS, you may or may not like USNA; if you hate NASS, you will not like USNA. Thus, if your sons find NASS is not sufficiently "supportive and encouraging," USNA probably isn't for them b/c I can guarantee you the real USNA experience won't be "better." That said, USNA does understand that parents are entrusting their kids to USNA and does try to make it possible for every kid who wants to succeed and stay to do so.
     
  5. Stage4survivor

    Stage4survivor Member

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    I won't pretend to understand what makes a good candidate, or a good Naval/Marine Corps officer. I leave that to those who make those decisions.
    For those who DO make these decisions, I would expect much encouragement and support in attaining their goals.
    I'm sure 99% of those accepted have great potential, the key is unlocking that potential.
    "Diamonds in the rough", wack 'em in the right place, they're brilliant gems.
     
  6. coffeecup3

    coffeecup3 Member

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    I think what she meant is that while at NASS, they are influential and are trying to convince students to apply and if accepted attend USNA. I went to Air Force Summer Seminar, and they do sway students into wanting to go there, however they do mention to everyone that some people will realize that the academy is not what they want college-wise. Am I close to what your saying/asking?

    Also, why did they apply if they don't think they want to attend NASS? :confused:
     
  7. Stage4survivor

    Stage4survivor Member

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    I'm a he

    They have waffled about attending since a close friend, whose sister is in her 3rd yr, told them it's really hard, even brutal.

    For 16yo boys the connection from hard work to...great rewards, is a long journey.
     
  8. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    I've never heard anyone describe NASS as "brutal." NASS is a recruiting tool, so USNA has an incentive for attendees to like it. It has changed in perspective over the years. Initially, it was very academically oriented. Attendees who later went to USNA said it didn't really "prepare" them in terms of what to expect at USNA.

    USNA then tried to make NASS more like a mini-plebe summer. That seemed too hard for some folks. So, now, it's a combination. They do about a day of "mock plebe summer" in terms of rates, PT etc. And they do a shortened Sea Trials, that I've found most of the kids find challenging but really enjoy.

    Certainly, it's no worse than Plebe Summer/Plebe year. Like I said, if you find NASS too brutal, too hard, not fun (so to speak), then USNA probably isn't for you. And learning that up front isn't a bad thing. There are thousands of wonderfully talented h.s. seniors for whom a SA is NOT the right "college." That doesn't diminish their qualities, achievements, etc. in any way and there are hundreds of great civilian schools where they can best fulfill their goals.
     
  9. Stage4survivor

    Stage4survivor Member

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    Sorry, I meant the academy is hard &/or brutal, not NASS
     
  10. marciemi

    marciemi USMA Alumnus

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    Just wanted to let you know that last summer, although the students were given the rates to memorize on the first day, they only had a 1/2 hour of "mock plebe summer" stuff - just one evening for a short period after dinner (I think it was called Plebe Indoc).

    The next day was the Sea Trials, which my son definitely agreed with your assessment of challenging but enjoyable. During that they were asked rates/dropped for pushups, etc., so that may be more of the day that you're thinking of. But it was only a half hour of standing at attending answering rates and being yelled at - then back to fun and games! :biggrin: Really, though, I think that was enough for at least a few people to decide this wasn't for them it sounds like!

    AF's SS said it had a full day of "Doolie for a Day", but it actually was from when the cadre blasted them out of bed around 5:30 until late morning. And although it was supposed to simulate eating in the dining hall as a freshman for breakfast, they allowed them to fall out for the last 10 minutes or so of the meal to make sure none of those poor little kids starved! :rolleyes: (please note my tone here is amused, not sarcastic or disparaging - basically comes down to they can't take any chances on kids who haven't "signed on the dotted line" yet!). But both academies had a lot less of that than my son was expecting.
     
  11. MIDNDAD

    MIDNDAD Member

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    Quite honestly the fact that your sons are thinking/asking if USNA is right for them is a positive thing. It's the first serious step for them to stop thinking like children and seriously consider the future as an adult. It's intimidateing.

    That said NASS is a 5 day experience that gives a glimpse of what their future 4 years will look like and the possiblity of a military career path. NASS is designed for both your sons and USNA to look eachother over and decide if this is a proper fit. If the answer is no then no harm no foul and go do something else in life that will make you happy.

    If the answer is yes then they will have started one of the most competitive college addmission processes in the county. The 4 part admissions process is designed to be tough and does a very effective job in selecting the overall best candidates. The best analogy I can think of is salmon swimming up stream. The weak or disinterested quit early, but the strong keep fighting on and the best of them make it to their I-Day in July.

    You mentioned your sons have a connection at the academy that is a 2C and has told them it a hard place. The friend is correct and honest. Your sons should also ask her if she would ever consider leaving at this point. I'm sure the answer would not be just no but "hell no". Ask her why is that.
     
  12. sbbond93

    sbbond93 Member

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    I realize a lot of people have commented already, but it is very important to me that people who are seriously considering the academy (not their parents telling them) should apply to NASS. I am a candidate from Maryland (already applied to NASS) and it is very difficult for interested people in this region to be accepted. I would be very disappointed if a non driven, parent pushed, lazy kid got in over me just because he is from South Dakota (under represented example). This is not meant to say it applies to you or any one else on this site but it is something i wish people would consider.
     
  13. Stage4survivor

    Stage4survivor Member

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    sbbond,

    You make an interesting and valid point. Personally, I AM pushing them to explore their interest in USNA by attending NASS, beyond that will be their decision.
    They attended an event in Brooklyn last summer and this increased their interest but, it waxes and wanes.
     
  14. sbbond93

    sbbond93 Member

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    Completely understandable and I do wish them the best of luck. Heck we may be class mates one day! :thumb:
     
  15. C/ 2nd Lt. McKnight

    C/ 2nd Lt. McKnight Member

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    This is kind of in a way unrelated.....

    However I've heard several times on here that NASS and other summer programs look for applicants from under-represented areas. What exactly does that mean?
     
  16. sbbond93

    sbbond93 Member

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    NASS is supposed to be a taste of Academy life for those interested. With that said only about 2,225 spots are open. There are many more interested candidates than they can accept; therefore, the academy selects by academic standards, but they also believe that it is necessary to complete geographic representation i.e. they want to give people from the midwest a chance to actually see the ocean before they apply or comittee to serving on it for 9 years. Consiquently a person who (such as me) lives 30 mins away and is in annapolis every weekend is not in as much of a "need" for a chance to see the Academy.

    Im biased but I hope you get the point.
     
  17. Stage4survivor

    Stage4survivor Member

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    Landlubbers! LOL

    I believe states/areas that typically don't get significant numbers of applicants. Where they are, I'm clueless.
    Though I spent four years in the Navy, I'm also clueless what makes a good Naval/Marine Corps officer. I trust in those who know make the right decisions, more often than not.
    I am old enough to know what I do not know.
     
  18. marciemi

    marciemi USMA Alumnus

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    I'm from the midwest and when I went to NASS (different name then) some 25+ years ago, it was the first time I'd seen the ocean!! :shake:

    Of course I also went to West Point's summer seminar that summer too, and it was the first time I'd seen any mountains!
     
  19. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Two things, according to USNA. First, states that typically send very few candidates to USNA. These include the "five sisters" -- WY, ND, SD, ID, MT. There may be a handful of others. There aren't a lot of people in these states and, b/c they're landlocked and far from USNA, many students in these states have never even heard of USNA. The hope is that, by sending kids from these states to NASS, they may be inspired to apply or they'll go back to their schools and neighborhoods and inspire others to look into USNA.

    Second, certain congressional districts where there have been zero applicants to USNA. Apparently, there were 37 of these in 2008. Some of these are in inner cities -- but not all. The view is that there are great students who are attending magnet schools and being wooed by Ivy League colleges, etc. but who don't know about USNA (see above -- same rationale).

    Because NASS is a RECRUITING TOOL, it is true that folks who fall into the above categories might well be given the nod over a "more qualified" candidate from, say, Annapolis. It may or may not be fair, but that's the approach USNA is taking -- using NASS to get the word out about USNA and attract more candidates from diverse geographic areas.

    This is why you should NOT read too much into an NASS turndown. As many of us have posted over & over, not getting into NASS does NOT mean you aren't a strong candidate for USNA.
     
  20. Stage4survivor

    Stage4survivor Member

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    I was told by a middies parent that NASS is definitely under-represented due to distance factors/cost.
    The further west, the more expensive it is for travel. I would expect the reverse is true for the AF academy.
    This makes sense to me.
    If my sons are accepted, and decide to go, I'd drive only because I'd like to see the Naval Academy!
    The old slogan, "Join the Navy, See the World", didn't work out for me! Four years, saw Sandy Eggo and Rhode Island. Spent an hour on the Intrepid before discharge just so I could say I was on a ship!
    At least I didn't have to vacation with the Marines in Southeast Asia!
    ;-)
     

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