Naval and Marine Aviation

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by 2020Graduate, Apr 16, 2016.

  1. 2020Graduate

    2020Graduate New Member

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    The 2016 class at the naval academy graduated 241 Navy Pilots and 95 Marine pilots. The 2016 class at the Air Force academy graduated almost 600 pilots. I understand that in 2016 98% of USAFA cadets were assigned their first preference of pilot training. My question is what percentage of midshipmen who select avaition as their first preference are assigned an avaition slot in the Marine or Navy community. Thank you
     
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  2. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    I would be interested in where you found the 98% figure.
     
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  3. 2020Graduate

    2020Graduate New Member

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    No problem, I doubt it is a scientific figure, however a member of the class of 2016 at USAFA who was my cadre during the AF summer seminar told me often that besides cadets who are medically disqualified, 98% of cadets who want to fly, get to fly.
     
  4. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    "A guy told me" is no source. When the Air Force plans from the beginning that half the class must be physically eligible for flight school then saying 98% who want to fly get to fly is like observing the sky is blue----what is more interesting is "how many pilots get their first choice out of training". The Air Force requires their flight students to accept one of four possible jobs: pilot, weapon systems operator (back seater), Battle Area Manager, or drone pilot upon graduation. Each one of those has a number of separate airframes and all depend on the needs of the AF at the moment (sometimes monthly) of graduation from flight school. That means you may train as a pilot and be assigned to sit in front of a radar screen as a Battle Area Manager as your new flying career. The Navy does a similar drill only all the pilot trainees will fly some type of airframe upon graduation. The only question mark for them is what type: jets, turboprops, helos. Which aircraft is also dependent on the needs of the service but at least they are not flying drones in Nevada.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2016
  5. 2020Graduate

    2020Graduate New Member

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    Sorry spud, didn't mean to offend you with my complete and utter ignorance. Just wanted to know if there was a published figure around...
     
  6. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    No one is offended but if you were to state that as a fact and begin with the words "I understand....." to a Plebe summer Detailer, you'd still be running around the field with a rifle at high port. Dude, I kissed you on the cheek....come on, give me a hug.
     
  7. kn5eq6yo9

    kn5eq6yo9 New Member

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    Info is dated but should be much the same now.

    There is no limit to the number of people who can choose Aviation on Service Selection night. However, be aware that not everyone makes it through flight school. Both Navy and Marines who choose Aviation go to flight school in Pensacola, FL after any temporary assignments, e.g. The Basic School for Marines. You have to pass the flight physical, again, after you arrive. You grades in Primary will determine your assignment to jets, fixed wing or helos. (No fixed wing assignment for Marines.) Service needs will determine how many "slots" are available for any type. Grades through Advanced will determine your aircraft and coast after you get your wings. Then you go to a service training squadron for your aircraft. (In some cases the specific aircraft may be assigned in the training squadron.) It used to take 1 1/2 to 2 years before you get to your first operational squadron.

    If you plan on going Aviation, get your private pilot's license before Selection to make sure you like flying (don't get airsick or freeze up) and it will give you a better chance to get your wish in Primary.

    Best of luck. Aviation was the best choice I ever made.
     
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  8. Hurricane12

    Hurricane12 USNA 2012

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    Curious how you got to "no fixed wing assignments for Marines." My primary onwing partner flying KC-130s may disagree.

    PPL vs. not also makes only a limited difference in performance.
     
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  9. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    Also look up USNA Powered Flight. Program does a good job of getting you acquainted with what it's like to fly and some basic before P-Cola. Listen to Hurricane, she is an active duty pilot via USNA. I was also confused about the USMC, no fixed wing thing, I know many USMC fixed wing aviators.
     
  10. Brawny77

    Brawny77 Member

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    Then who is going to fly those vertical take off F35s that the marines just ordered?
    I am pretty sure it will be jarheads. And some premo top of the line jarheads at that.
     
  11. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    I showed this to resident pilot DH. He opined fixed wing is any aircraft with permanently affixed wings, and can be powered by propeller, jet or non-powered, such as a glider, with the other main division being rotary-winged. Several aviation sources online, not just Wikipedia, follow that general definition.

    I immediately thought of the all-Marine pilots and crew who fly Fat Albert (C-130) with the Blue Angels.
     
  12. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    Not to mention all the Marine Pilots who fly F/A-18s on the Blue Angels. Usually 1-3 of them depending on the year.
     
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  13. kn5eq6yo9

    kn5eq6yo9 New Member

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    Alright. Alright. My humble apologies. I'm an old fart and didn't explain myself very well.

    In my days, Primary was in the T-34B at Saufley Field. It consisted of little more than unusual attitudes and solo. You're absolutely correct. PPL would not be any use in the current system.

    For us, the "fixed wing" pipeline was the same as multi-engine pipeline. Yes even though it was long ago, we did know that jets had wings. In those days, only Navy pilots went through the multi-engine pipeline. I'm not aware of any Marines going through the multi-engine pipeline. I did not mean to imply that there were no Marine C-130 or OV-10 pilots. It was just a difference in how they got there.

    I think at that time the Marine Corps wanted everyone to go through either the jet or helo pipeline. As an example of how thinking went then, helo pilots were officially classified as "restricted" pilots. Probably a vestige of the Viet Nam war.

    Back to the original question, if you chose aviation as service selection and you get through flight school, you get to fly. Initial assignment depends on your grades in flight school and needs of the service. But it will be a flying billet.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2016
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  14. nuensis

    nuensis USNA 2016

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    244 Navy Pilot slots available in September when we entered our preferences. 228 midshipmen put Navy Pilot as their first choice. Final number was 241.

    90 USMC Pilot slots available, 95 midshipmen put USMC Pilot as their first choice. Final number was 95.

    All sorts of crazy magic happened between September 11 and November 19. It's impossible to make any reliable generalization about service assignment.
     
  15. BlahuKahuna

    BlahuKahuna Member

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    Where did you find this number?
     

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