Need Help W/ Waiver Process

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by KatieBarbor, Sep 3, 2012.

  1. KatieBarbor

    KatieBarbor New Member

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    So... applying to the service academies and my DoDMERB results came in yesterday. I was disqualified for asthma. However, my asthma has never been an issue growing up. It was mild as a kid, and my last attack was in the 4th grade. I am a varsity athlete year-round with a mile time around 6 minutes. But, my mom made my keep an inhaler by my side at all times (she's big on safety) and the last time I used it was probably 3 years ago. It says this all on my exam but I was still DQ'd.

    My status is : Pending Waiver Submission

    So my question is - how do you request a waiver? Is it automatically submitted? Are there any further tests that I can take to prove that my asthma has never slowed me down?

    Please help me...give me hope....anything
     
  2. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    This is an automatic DQ for a condition that is common and waiverable. I'm not sure if it works differently for the service academies, but for ROTC the request for a waiver was automatic. You can contact DODMERB to verify this and find out what steps you need to take.

    You may be asked for additional documentation. Almost certainly you will be required to take a test such as methacholine challenge. If you search the forum you can find other discussions of the subject.

    My son had similar issues and received a waiver. Also, he was slower than you are.
     
  3. KatieBarbor

    KatieBarbor New Member

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    Thank you very much!!
     
  4. mdrob214

    mdrob214 Member

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    Whatever you do, don't stop any other application process. THE DODMERB MEDICAL PROCESS and both the SA APPOINTMENT PROCESS and ROTC OFFER PROCESS are NOT RELATED. In the case of the SAs, once your application is complete and record meets the board (the how and when is a mysterious process only the Admissions Board knows) they will decide to offer you an appointment or not. They DON'T look at your medical status as part of the offer of appointment. Once they review your record if you are a competitive candidate they will initiate the waiver process. If they need more information from you, they go to DODMERB, who requests it from you. DODMERB doesn't issue the waiver. The individual Service Academies do based on if they think your record is competitive enough to get an appointment. In the case of my DD last year she was DQd for a shoulder injury in October when we submitted the paperwork documenting the injury and treatment plan. By the beginning of December the USAFA had granted a waiver pending "in process exam." Meaning upon acceptance and on I-Day thier doctors would examine her to see if surgery was successful. USNA didn't do the waiver until we submitted the results of the surgery and physical therapy. Surgery was 30 Dec, received Dr clearance to workout 1 Feb and full activity 20 Feb. Submitted to DODMERB 20 Feb, USNA wavier on 27 Feb or so.
    ROTC is different. I think for all services. In the case of NROTC, they didn't even look at her medical until they offered the scholarship. That came in early December. After that you had until the end of your first semester to get medically qualified.

    So, lesson here is to complete the application and nomination processes separate from the medical process. The second thing is CONTACT DODMERB. They are there to help you. They don't make the decision on the wavier they only provide the information. Don't give up until I-Day has past. Not saying it will happen for sure, but don't NOT get an appointment because you didn't work every lead on your medical.
     
  5. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Also, the standards for ROTC and the SAs may be different (ROTC usually not quite as stringent). Each service also can have different standards/requirements and may make different waiver decisions. Thus, the fact that you may receive a waiver for one does not necessarily mean you'll receive a waiver for the other.

    Finally, every single situation is unique. Be honest. Be proactive. Be timely. And have a Plan B that does not involve the military.
     

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