New USNA Candidate

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by TNCan, Jul 21, 2010.

  1. TNCan

    TNCan Member

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    I attended NASS this summer and am in the process of completing applications. I am 2nd in my class with a 5.27 GPA, 34 ACT, 3 Varsity Sports. However, I have been told I need Naval Officer recommendations to receive a nomination. I have seen conflicting information regarding recommendation letters. I sincerely believe the Naval Academy is where I want to go. Can anyone clarify this for me?
     
  2. wiscyellowjacket

    wiscyellowjacket Member

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    Go to USNA1985's stickey about admissions FAQ's. And nominations don't come from Naval Officers, they come from Senators and representatives.
     
  3. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    All Senator and representative requirements are different. Perhaps someone told the OP that a Naval Officer recommendation was desirable. Best go to the MOCs' websites and read their requirements. I doubt very highly that it will mention thiis particular requirement. However, no matter how distant the connection, some candidates do actually seem to go out of their way to obtain a military officer's recommendation. I would always recommend, however, that they find those who can make solid positive concrete observations and utilize them instead.
     
  4. osdad

    osdad Member

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    Perhaps OP is confusing the MOC nomination process or BGO interview for USNA with the recommendation/interview necessary for NROTC. That is done by a Commissioned Officer.

    Advice to candidates: study the whole process and know it inside and out. That includes how each of your MOC does there nominations; so yes, there's 4 processes to know. My Plebe made up a spread sheet showing all of the necessary steps and due dates. These were checked off as she progressed.
     
  5. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    There's a bit of apples and oranges in your question. It's understandable that the process is confusing. As noted, you might want to read my stickies as they may help answer your question.

    There are 2 sets of recommendations for a USNA application process (and a third for NROTC). The first is what USNA itself requires. This is 11th grade math and English teachers (virtually no exceptions), and guidance counselor. USNA does accept other letters of recommendation but they are NOT required and they certainly do NOT need to come from an officer.

    You may be thinking of an interview with a Blue & Gold Officer (BGO), who may or may not be an "officer." Yes, the name is confusing. Most BGOS -- not all -- are grads or parents of mids/grads. Grads may or may not be on active duty, may or may not be retired. The BGO writes up an interview which, I suppose, could be considered a "recommendation."

    Members of Congress (MOCs) each set their own requirements for nominations. A nomination is also required for appointment to USNA You must check the MOCs' websites or wherever they direct you for information regarding what they require in terms of recommednations. Some will let you send additional letters, many will not. I'm not aware of any requiring a letter from an "officer," but there could be such a requirement out there.

    Finally, NROTC require an interview with a commissioned or retired officer (as best I recall). In some cases, the BGO can do the NROTC interview. Some BGOs, such as myself, who are not on active duty and did not serve until "retirement," cannot do an NROTC interview.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. mademu

    mademu Member

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    You're not required to get a letter from a naval officer, but it probably couldn't help. I believe the only 3 recommendations letters you fill out on the form are from a math teacher, english teacher and your guidance counselor.

    However, my regional BGO recommended to me to send him any other recommendations I wanted directly. Talk to your regional BGO.

    He's the one that works on the yard in admissions and his name is listed on the main page of the application.
     
  7. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Just to clarify . . .

    First, a letter of rec from a current officer won't help unless the person knows you really well AND has something about you to discuss that won't be covered by your teachers and counselor (and BGO). If you don't know such a person, don't worry about it. Many people applying to USNA have no prior experience or contact with the military -- it will NOT hurt you.

    USNA has to go through thousands of applications. Sending in additional letters just to do it is more annoying than helpful. If there is some aspect of your life that isn't covered elsewhere (e.g., you work during the school year and summer and get a letter from your employer (may help explain lack of school activities); you are heavily involved in church activities and get a letter from your clergy).

    Second, you are confusing your Regional Director (RD) with your BGO. The RD is the officer who works in Candidate Guidance (Admissions) at USNA and is responsible for admissions for your geographic region. Yes, you would send additional letters to him/her. Your BGO is the person who lives in your geographic area and with whom you interview. He or she may or may not be on active duty or an officer (despite the title). You do not need to provide your additional letters of rec to your BGO.
     
  8. TNCan

    TNCan Member

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    Thank you all for the information. I have gotten applications from each MCO, and understand the process. I was going on advice from different people that said I should get recommendations from Naval Officers (which I do not know personally) vs. people I know. I have called my BGO, but have not had contact as of yet. Just to clarify, it is better to have recommendations from people that know me well, (teachers, coaches, church director,etc...) than to seek out ones from Naval Officers?
     
  9. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    First, meet the requirements of USNA and MOCs re the individuals from whom you need recommendations (certain teachers, etc.).

    If you want to submit additional ones (and, for MOCs, are permitted to do so), absolutely get them from people who know you well. Do not seek out Naval Officers who don't know you for letters of recommendation. They won't be worth the paper they're written on.
     
  10. subvet

    subvet Member

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    OK I'll bite. What ever happened to 4.0 being as good as it gets??
     
  11. brian3321

    brian3321 New Member

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    Brian,Sr.

    Hang in there TNCan - your B&G Officer (NAIA-NAIO) will be in touch with you and will arrange for an interview - most likely at your house. There are a good few candidates who are as anxious as you are to complete all the requirements for their application submission. B&G Officers are regular folks with jobs and families who volunteer their free time, which is often limited, to helping with the USNA application process. Thank you for considering a career wherein you will defend our freedoms.
    USNA Parent
    Ens. Brian USNA '09/8 SEALs
    Ens. Ian USNA '09/30 SWO (SEALs selectee)
     
  12. Pachrian

    Pachrian Parent

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    AP classes can earn you up to 5 at my sons' school, but beyond that???

    Good thing that admission doesn't just look at the numbers, they also know the context. A 4.5 at one school cannot be compared to a 4.5 at another school without background.
     
  13. navy2016

    navy2016 Member

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    ap or ib classes, making a's in honors also pulls ur gpa up.

    for example my unweighted is 3.8- weighted is 4.7 (our valedictorians usually get 5.1 or better- therefore im only in the top 10/250)
    i dont like how with unweighted if u make a b (92 in my area) u can no longer have a 4.0. I had 2 92's.
    therefore, someone with straight 93 a's will have an unweighted gpa higher than mine
     
  14. TNCan

    TNCan Member

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    I have only taken Honors or AP classes the last 3 years or my GPA would actually go down. It does sound crazy, but an A in an AP class demands more than an A in a standard class and thus should be reflected in GPA. I agree a 5.27 at one school does not mean the same at another. My school used to be on a 7 point scale, but to stay competitive with other prep schools in area recently changed to 10 pt. scale. I believe above average weighted GPA's should be reflected in AP Exam scores, ACT and SAT scores to be credible indicators of achievement.
     

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