Nomination Question

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by LakeErie69, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. LakeErie69

    LakeErie69 Member

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    Okay before I ask this: I'm not expecting the answer to this question to be yes, but it's worth a try.

    So my dad's family owns a house in upstate NY in a relatively rural, lightly populated area. Our family pays taxes there and has owned the place for several years. We go there several times throughout the year.

    Although I don't permanently live there, is there any possibilty that I could apply for a nomination for that congressional district?

    The only reason I ask is because I know someone who can apply for two districts due to his parents divorce. But this is obviously different.

    I'm sure I won't be able to but why not ask?


    Thanks
     
  2. Rojo17

    Rojo17 Member

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    It depends on the MOC, but most of the time it is only the place of residence in which you are allowed to apply for a nomination.
     
  3. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    My understanding is that your residence is based on where your parents claim residence -- where they own/rent property, where they vote, where they pay income tax, where their car is registered, the state in which they have a driver's license, etc.

    I don't believe "vacation" property is sufficient to establish residence.

    If your parents are divorced -- or live separately for other reasons (I've seen it happen with happily married parents) -- and they claim separate states/districts of residence, then you can apply to either (not both).
     
  4. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    A big clue may be... "where are your parents registered to vote?" Presumably the follow-on question in the event they are registered in different districts, "who claims you as a dependent or who has legal custody of you?" That being premised, I am not an attorney, so this is just conjecture on my part, but I would expect those to be reasonable considerations.
     
  5. egri

    egri Member

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    The same circumstances apply to me-divorced parents, one in RI, one in IN. I asked an officer at a USNA event if I could apply to both, and he said the same thing: pick one or the other. In my case, I'm better established in RI, so I'm applying from there.
     
  6. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Being totally honest, I would apply from the state/district that gives you the best chance for a nomination -- which is typically the state/district that has fewer applications. You could ask the nom coordinator for the senators and congressperson how many applications he/she had last year. My GUESS is that Indiana would be less competitive -- but that's only a guess.
     
  7. Packer

    Packer Member

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    Some MOCs will also provide SAT/ACT data for their previous nominees which would be valuable information to someone in egri's position.
     
  8. 2012mom?

    2012mom? Member

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    The same situation applied to my now-Ensign, way back when. IIRC, we were told that she should apply in the state where she attended HS.

    I would have guessed that RI would be more competitive than IN, too, but that MAY not be the case. A quick comparison of the USNA Supe's and Dean's list from Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2011 shows that only 8 or 9 people from RI made the list each time, but 19-25 from IN were on it each time. This suggests that there are more high-performing Mids from Indiana than Rhode Island, but this stat obviously doesn't reflect the numbers of applicants per MOC, which is one critical determinant of the competitiveness of an area.
     
  9. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    If you check this forum's archives you will find a recent question regarding the distribution of appointments by state. Enter there and search through the responses and you will find a link to a site that has tons of information regarding where USNA has gotten its appointees over recent years... it does seem to me that 2010 is the most recent year depicted. Regardless, there should be more than enough data to keep you busy for at least 15 minutes. HOWEVER, it is not broken out by congressional district! Best wishes.
     

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