Nominations per state

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Astef67, Jan 23, 2015.

  1. Astef67

    Astef67 Member

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    Is there a list of how many nominations your senator gave out? I know it's no more then 10 but it could be less right?
     
  2. falconchic88

    falconchic88 Member

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    Contact you Senator's Academy liaison/rep. S/He should be able to answer that for you. It may or may not be posted on their website.
     
  3. ca2midwestmom

    ca2midwestmom Member

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    Yes, it could be less if there are not enough qualified candidates. As falconchi88 said above, a lot of MOC will issue press releases / post the list of nominees on their website. That's a good place to start.
     
  4. Astef67

    Astef67 Member

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    Thanks
     
  5. falconchic88

    falconchic88 Member

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    After I answered that post I looked up our Rep's website, and sure enough, his were posted. Found out that there were only 6 nominated to USNA and only 8 to USAFA. 15 candidates nominated in total, most of them, like DD, getting noms to several Academies. I'm surprised there weren't more applicants. We moved here two years ago, and if we had moved just 1 mile south or west we would have been in a very competitive district! Most of the students at DDs High School are in the other district. We lucked out on that one!
     
  6. usnabgo08

    usnabgo08 USNA 2008/BGO

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    For most states, I would argue that Senators very rarely do not fill their entire slate (essentially that means less than 20 candidates are applying from the state). I am sure there are exceptions for the less populated (rural) states. However, Senators can pick from anyone in their state, so their "pot" is big. It is more likely for a Congressman/Congresswoman not to fill theirs, since their scope is limited to their district. Not sure if OP meant Members of Congress or specifically, Senators.
     
  7. falconchic88

    falconchic88 Member

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    I think OP stated Senators. I was just relaying facts wrt our district that I didn't realize until I checked due to OPs question. I would agree that most Senators fill their slates. When we lived in Ohio, our Senators had over 400 applicants.
     
  8. 53AlumKid

    53AlumKid Member

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    Can anyone shed a little light on the numbers of nominations vs appointments, I'm a little confused. If there are 535 MOC's with up to 10 nominations each, plus presidential, VP, Reserve, etc, there could be 5,000+ nominations, correct? I understand many MOC's may not fill their 10 nominations. But then I understand that there are roughly only 2,000 qualified candidates who receive nominations. Does that mean there are 1,000's of nominated candidates who are unqualified for some reason? Or does it mean that the majority of MOC's only nominate one or two candidates?
     
  9. Astef67

    Astef67 Member

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    How could you get a nomination and not be qualified?
     
  10. 53AlumKid

    53AlumKid Member

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    I don't know, I think that's part of what I don't understand. How are there only about 2,000 candidates both qualified and nominated if there are 5,000+ nominations. Does that make sense, or am I totally missing part of the equation?
     
  11. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Just a dad

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    For example many pass the nom interview with flying colors but are DQd by DODMERB.
     
  12. bubalma

    bubalma Member

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    Since no one else who's been involved with the process over an extended period of time seems to be weighing in on a Saturday, I might as well:

    There's so much more to this. Being nominated and being qualified (3Q'ed) are in essence two separate tracks. If you are not nominated, being 3Q'ed becomes a moot point since you will not get an appointment unless you have a nomination from some source (Congressional, Vice Presidential, Presidential, SECNAV for the fleet or NAPS).

    If you have a nomination, you still are not guaranteed an appointment unless you are deemed qualified by the Academy. There are three separate qualification areas involved in the qualification process i.e. being 3Q'ed. These areas are physical health as determined by DODMERB, physical fitness as determined by your CFA and academic qualification as determined by a vote of the Admissions Board.

    Admissions Board decisions are highly subjective particularly when it comes to academic qualifications and to a much smaller extent, physical qualifications. Your Admissions Officer is given a very limited time to present your case after which the Board discusses you and then votes whether you are in fact qualified as a candidate. Many factors are considered during this quite limited period of time - taking into account your Whole Person Score (WPS) which rates you in many different areas - quality and consistency of academic work in the past, quality of high school or college attended, difficulty of courses taken, background problems and the list goes on. Even a high WPS doesn't guarantee you being academically qualified by the Board since so much depends on discussions held in the room before the vote regarding you as an individual.

    I think most who have been through the process both themselves and through the experiences of their children would agree that the most difficult hurdle to pass in being 3Q'ed is being academically qualified since the process is so involved and also so subjective.

    THEN, given the fact that a candidate is actually 3Q'ed, that individual still has to slug it out in competition with other 3Q'ed candidates who are also 3Q'ed for the limited number of slots that are available at the Academy. That is where things really get subjective. Principal nominees - as opposed to nominees coming from "equal and competitive" nomination slates - do have a certain leg up on potential appointments; but even they don't necessarily have a guaranteed slot.

    As with anything, there are always some exceptions to what I've stated above; but in broad general terms, the above comments summarize the process.
     
  13. 53AlumKid

    53AlumKid Member

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    Ok, so in effect you are saying there are 1,000' s of candidates who receive nominations who are not 3Q'ed? I think that's the part I was unsure of. I assumed that a candidate would have to be 3Q'ed in order to receive a nomination.
     
  14. ca2midwestmom

    ca2midwestmom Member

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    Some candidates may receive a nomination (say in November/December) while waiting on a medical waiver, only to find the waiver is denied later on (say in March/April). They have a nomination but are not 3Q. I don't recall MOC asking my DS if he was 3Q for the SAs he applied to. There are likely many candidates that are not 3Q at the time of their interview(s).
     
  15. usnabgo08

    usnabgo08 USNA 2008/BGO

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    bubalma summarized the process pretty well. Just to re-emphasize...

    Applying for a nomination and completing the USNA application are TWO completely DIFFERENT processes and ARE NOT mutually exclusive with regards to whether someone is nominated/qualified. The MOC (in reality, their committee or SA lead) determines whether a candidate is "qualified" to be listed on their nomination slate AND USNA determines the scholastic, medical, physical qualifications. MOCs and USNA DO NOT communicate with each other with regards to whether a candidate is qualified, with the exception being Letters of Assurance and once the slates are "turned in."

    The term "fully qualified" means that a candidate has been found scholastically, physically, and medically qualified by USNA and has an official nomination. Being fully qualified only means that candidates are eligible to compete for an appointment -- it DOES NOT equal appointment.

    The latest statistics indicate there are over 3,000 candidates who are fully qualified. Hence, why I stated in previous posts, the odds are between 40-50% for those FQ'd. Thus, there will be FQ'd candidates who DO NOT receive appointments. Additionally, not everyone who is listed on the MOC's nomination slate is 3Q'd by USNA.
     
  16. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    To add to the excellent posts above, sometimes it's a timing issue. I've had more than a few candidates receive nominations but then don't complete their packages. That can happen for many reasons (candidate loses interest; learns he/she is medically DQ'ed and unlikely to get a waiver, etc.). If you don't complete your USNA application, it matters not how many noms you have -- you won't receive an appointment.
     
  17. 53AlumKid

    53AlumKid Member

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    I guess I am just very surprised to hear that somewhere between 40% - 60% of those receiving nominations either do not follow through or are not qualified for some other reason. I would have guessed that most receiving nominations would also be qualified.
     
  18. JShawshank

    JShawshank Member

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    I think it's also worth noting that I've seen numbers indicating that there are ~4,000 candidates that actually get nominated (implying that many have more than one nom - e.g., many who get a sen. nom also get a reps nom, presidential nom also gets a rep nom, etc.). So, maybe more like 25% nominated but not 3Q/don't finish their application, etc. using usnabgo08's estimate of '3,000 fully qualified'.
     
  19. CAmidparent

    CAmidparent Member

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    Also, I know this forum is for many people hoping and praying for a USNA appointment, but I know of several candidates who found out that they received a 4-year NROTC scholarship to a very prestigious university in the Jan-Feb time frame, and decided to go ahead and go with NROTC and turned down the USNA appointment... YES, it does happen!!! There are truly candidates where USNA is their "plan B". I personally know of one young man who received his appointment to USNA, then was notified that he received a 4 year NROTC to Notre Dame!!! He chose ND and is now a junior and is incredibly happy with his decision!! In fact, said it was the best decision he ever made!!
     
  20. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    If you were to look at the last 4 or 5 USNA Class Profiles you would note that there have been something in excess or 15,000 applications each year (there is a question about how those numbers are derived, but that is not germane to this discussion). Further, you would discover that each year there are about 6,400 nominations awarded for NAVY. Of those about 5,200 nominations come from US Congressmen and Senators, about 800 from the President, 300 form SecNav, etc. Next you will discover that about 2,500 nominees are deemed fully qualified. USNA typically will offer 1,300 to 1,400 appointments, and that will result in an entering class of about 1,200. The numbers are approximations, but close enough to give you an overview of the process. Bear in mind that many candidates end up with noms from more than one source. Also bear in mind that there are degrees of being fully qualified; not all are equal. Finally, as to the number of offers tendered vs the number accepted, a good number of candidates have applied to more than one academy, and NAVY may not be their first choice. I know this probably raises more questions than it answers, but it should help a bit in understanding the nomination vs appointment scramble.
     

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