NROTC effect on admission to USNA

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by jh1597, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. jh1597

    jh1597 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have seen debates on this forum whether doing NROTC in college and reapplying would increase chances of admission upon reapplying. (Very relevant to me, as I have completed my second application and will apply again if I do not receive an appointment this year.) I came across a thesis by a student at the Naval Postgraduate School states that the Candidate Multiple for accepted Midshipmen admitted with a nomination from NROTC or enlisted service is "considerably lower" than those with nominations from MOCs, Presidential, etc. From this data, it seems to me that if you are a qualified candidate AND participate in NROTC then you have a better shot at receiving an appointment. Here is the link: http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA427695
    The part I am referring to begins at the bottom of page 30 and continues onto page 31. Please offer your opinion on it as I am curious to see whether my conclusions match what other people gather from the info. I am considering transferring to a school with NROTC for my sophomore year of college because of this possible leg up in admissions and for a backup plan in case I do not receive an appointment my third time through. Hopefully admissions will see how determined I am to make it, and maybe the 3rd time will be a charm!!! :biggrin:
     
  2. dunninla

    dunninla Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,866
    Likes Received:
    5
    this is the 2nd Thread today about re-re-applying. the other is for USMA.

    How many are admitted each year on the 3rd try into USNA?

    From the applicant's perspective, how many are willing to exchange 2 years remaining in college for 4 years remaining?
     
  3. jh1597

    jh1597 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    dunninla,

    I wish I knew how many are admitted on the third try. The Naval Academy does not get that specific with the data they put out. I do know that in the Class of 2015, 84 admitted Midshipmen had completed at least one semester of college at a civilian university prior to coming to the Academy.

    As for the applicant being willing to give up 2 years, I can only speak for myself. I am absolutely, positively willing to exchange two years for attending the Naval Academy!
     
  4. 2012mom?

    2012mom? Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2007
    Messages:
    642
    Likes Received:
    2
    jh: Your desire to attend USNA is commendable, but isn't the real goal to be a Naval officer? From your other post, it appears that you are now in NROTC. If you are currently in your second year of NROTC, starting as a Plebe at USNA would put you a full rank behind where you would be if you simply finish college via NROTC. That is, by the time you would become an Ensign/2nd Lt via USNA, your current classmates will be putting on LTJG or 1st Lt.
     
  5. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    923
    Likes Received:
    16
    A couple of thoughts... I had a roomie who did AROTC at a major state school who gave it up to start over at USNA. He never mentioned regretting his decision, and did very well at NAVY. He just felt NAVY was the better school for him! I knew a Coastie who tried NAVY three times and got turned down every time, the third time he hedged his bet by applying to USCGA - and got accepted there. After his first sea tour he was surprised to get orders to USNA - as an instructor! It really depends upon what YOU want for yourself and how hard you are willing to work to get it. There always is the chance that you won't get what you really want, but you will have the satisfaction of knowing that you gave it your absolute best shot!
     
  6. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

    Joined:
    May 3, 2010
    Messages:
    1,444
    Likes Received:
    0
    Disreguard it. To lump Enlisted and NROTC together indicates the author has very little understanding of the workings of the Admissions office. NROTC appointees are also most likely eligible for any or all of the other appointment sources. Why Admissions chooses to give them a NROTC will vary from individual to individual and may depend on their competition more than it depends on themselves. Additionally, the ratio of a possible 170 Active/Reserve to 20 total J/NROTC candidates would cause the NROTC data to become irrelavent.

    Not saying not to pursue ROTC but please don't use the results of this thesis to do so.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2012

Share This Page