NROTC fitness test question

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Coby12998, Oct 5, 2016.

  1. Coby12998

    Coby12998 New Member

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    Are there any averages or passing scores posted anywhere for the NROTC fitness test? I want to know if my scores are sufficient enough. I got 64 push-ups, 80 sit-ups, and 6:24 mile. Would it be worth redoing it to get better scores if I already have passing numbers?

    Thanks!
     
  2. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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  3. JillAndlea

    JillAndlea New Member

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    NavyNOLA - I have been reading this ROTC site and trying to educate myself to support my son. He is a freshman at Old Dominion University and is in the College Program - NROTC. He is committed to earning either a 2 or 3 year scholarship or advanced standing. One of my questions is, at what point in time is the Fitness score that he receives the "one" that will be used to calculate his status for a pilot slot? Next, he is learning to follow the chain of command. Whom would you say is his best resource for answers to his questions, like - how will he know if ODU is recommending him for a scholarship? Is the Navy the kind of atmosphere that you don't get what you don't ask for? Should he to express to someone there that being a Naval Aviator & Officer is his life's dream as well as demonstrate that through his deeds? Any additional sources of information for parents that are trying to guide while also letting their kids find their way on their own is greatly appreciated! Many thanks.
     
  4. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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    It sounds like you are jumping ahead a bit here. The 2-year/3-year side loads and service assignment aren't important at the moment. Instead, he should be focusing on submitting a National scholarship application, assuming he hasn't done so; the scholarship is open to those with less than 30 credit hours and is due NLT 31 JAN. If he's not complete with this yet, he needs to get a jump on it.

    The Navy's fitness test is the PRT and is separate from what was being discussed above; the AFA is a fitness test that is only used in the National scholarship selection process. The PRT has little bearing on service assignment, unless a student is going for NSW/EOD. For everything else, a GOOD or better will be just fine. Having a higher score will potentially result in high aptitude marks from the staff each semester, but, assuming he's already meeting the standard, there are many other important areas to focus on (GPA, performance in future billets in the battalion, ASTB scores for pilot/NFO selection, etc.). No one PRT is more important than another. There is an "official" PRT at the end of every semester and it is the one that is recorded.

    His freshman advisor should be his primary resource for all things scholarship. If he's not already working closely with this officer, he needs to be. It's up to your son to submit the National application this fall, and the CO will likely do his interview to provide a recommendation (the unit should be providing guidance on all this). If he has questions on his competitiveness for a scholarship, he should direct those concerns to his advisor. For many other day to day concerns in his battalion, he should be working with his squad leader (typically a sophomore).

    To demonstrate his desire to be there, he needs to PERFORM- GPA (SO important, especially calculus and physics), PRT, performance in battalion events, attitude, communication, volunteering for optional activities, joining unit clubs, etc. Show the staff he wants to be there through his actions (and submit the scholarship!).

    As far as additional information for parents, I can't give you too much. This website is a great resource, and the staff at the individual units are available to take calls from parents if needed, but this process ultimately comes down to one group of people......the students. Your son needs to take the initiative and work with his advisor to put together a scholarship package so that he can continue on in this program. Generally speaking, the most motivated and proactive students tend to go the furthest in NROTC. As a parent, you can only help him so much- he's going to have to earn this one through his own efforts.

    Hope this helps.

    Edit- the 3-year side load window opens in late spring. If he doesn't earn the National by 1 MAY, his unit should help him prepare a 3-year side load package.
     

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