NROTC-Marine Option

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Melitzank, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    474
    Likes Received:
    1
    I know that the NROTC Marine Option scholarships are VERY competitive...are they given out nationally or per school...I`m a little confused by this. I just feel like there isn`t very much Marine Option information out there. Any tips?
     
  2. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,670
    Likes Received:
    813
    Very competitive? yes

    Scholarships are awarded to an individual school rather than nationally.

    What questions do you have? How can we help?
     
  3. pilot2b

    pilot2b Candidate Appointee

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    311
    Likes Received:
    1
    I applied last year for a M.O. NROTC scholarship. If I remember right, they have the country divided up into at least two different areas for scholarship boards. I wouldn't worry about the small stuff like that though.

    Tips: Grades are always important, as are standardized (SAT/ACT) test scores. The Marines request in their application, which is online, that you give them the names and email addresses of several individuals for recommendations. The Marine recruiting district XO for my area emailed me the forms to print out and hand-deliver to my teachers. They do specify for at least two of the three which subject matter they teach (math, English, etc.). Make certain you stay on good terms with all your teachers and impress them. This doesn't just mean how well you do gradewise, but also your dedication, work ethic, and how well you work with other students. The forms for the evaluations have specific boxes for your teachers to rank you in those categories.

    Beyond that, the biggest thing you can do to better your odds is train for the PFT. A perfect score would be 20 deadhang pullups or chinups (your choice which way your hands face), 100 situps in two minutes, and a three mile run in 18 minutes or less. When my OSO (officer selection officer) for my district called me to discuss my application over the phone, one of the first things he asked me was about my fitness level. Oftentimes the biggest struggle seems to be the run. Work on it. My OSO told me that the run is the single most looked at event of the PFT for the reason that the Marines have found that how well you do on the run suggests your odds of graduating OCS the summer of your senior year more than any other single factor.
     
  4. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,670
    Likes Received:
    813
    Grades, physical fitness, standardized test scores AND demonstrated leadership positions on teams, clubs, extra curriculars.

    All go to making a strong package

    You will also have an interview which is very important
     
  5. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,547
    Likes Received:
    1,009
    The Marine Option scholarships work just like the Navy option except the physical fitness test is different and the academic minimums are different. Don't let the academic minimums fool you. If you aren't way above those limits you are not competitive. They use the same application as Navy option and there is a checkbox to indicate whether you're applying for Navy or Marines (or Nursing). You can only apply for one, ie. you cannot apply for a Navy AND a Marine Option scholarship.

    You will list five schools with NROTC, in order of preference, on your application. The competition for the scholarship is national, and the future MIDN is placed in one of the five colleges after it's decided they will be offered a scholarship. Make sure you are willing to attend any one of these schools as transfers to another school are few and difficult to obtain.

    I agree with the earlier post about run times being key to success at OCS and I'm sure they are looked at closely when awarding a scholarship. But upper body strength (pullups) is also important. A high school student who can do 15-16 pullups is doing pretty well. Females do a flexed arm hang instead of pullups. I'm not sure the run times are so critical when awarding a scholarship as I'm sure they feel you'll improve, but they should be pretty good. The Marines are obsessed with physical fitness so a good score on the PFT is important.

    The NROTC Marine Option scholarship doesn't care about your major. That is, it's not based on the Tier system that is used for Navy Option scholarships. There are only two boards for Marine Option scholarships. I think one is in November and the second is either March or April. but they don't really publish the dates.

    You can enter as a college programmer if you don't get a scholarship and apply for an in-school (sideload) scholarship each semester starting second semester of your freshman year. These are also a national competition. I know last autumn's board awarded between 20-25 scholarships so you can see that is very competitive as well... but at least there is an application process as opposed to Army where you just find out one day that they decided to award you a scholarship.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2012
  6. Cindy15905

    Cindy15905 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    My DD was awarded the NROTC-MO last year and the only thing I would add to all the above posts is they also like to see your ability to handle multiple responsibilities successfully. For example, my DD had good grades, volunteered, good SAT/ACT scores, worked part time, and had a good PFT. I think this gave her a leg up on the kids who had just great SAT's and were physically fit. Just something to consider :smile:
     
  7. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    474
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thank you ALL so very much for answering my question and giving me a lot of information! The official websites never go too much in depth.

    Just curious, what`s the lowest GPA you`ve seen being accepted in the recent years...obviously, I`m going to get it up as high as I can, but what`s the usual range of it? I`ve only got a 3.7 (Weighted) right now. I`m taking one AP class currently, and am planning on taking at least 4 more before I graduate.

    I`m active with my youth group, and we do lots of community work, and I`m planning on volunteering this coming summer, as well as working. I`m on the track team at school as well. If, with work, I worked my way up to get a higher position, would that be considered leadership if it involved being "in charge" of people?

    I know you can`t tell me what chance I`ve got really, but am I at least on the right path?
     
  8. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,547
    Likes Received:
    1,009
    You're on the right path. Being in charge of people counts as leadership. I'd tr to get team captain on the track team if you can.
     
  9. Cindy15905

    Cindy15905 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    It looks to me like you are definitely on the right path. The best advice I see over and over on this forum is to just give 110% at everything you do (grades, work, ECA) and let the chips fall where they land. You can not control anything else but your own effort and focus. Good luck to you!!:thumb:
     
  10. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    474
    Likes Received:
    1
    Kinnem, thank you. I will try to do that.

    Cindy15905, thank you as well. I`ll give not only 110% but 120%, and do my best with everything.
     
  11. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    474
    Likes Received:
    1
    I`m also glad to hear that major doesn`t really have an impact on the scholarship as I`m planning to major in Journalism.
     

Share This Page