NROTC Occupational Specialty Assignments

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Ivydad, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. Ivydad

    Ivydad Member

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    I am interested if anyone would know what percentage of 2011/2012 NROTC midshipmen received their first or second choice Occupational Specialty Assignments. It was my understanding that top grades/PT scores from a top school would give you the best opportunity and first choice... but I have recently heard of someone with the above noted qualities being assigned to SWO Navy Nukes, which was their last choice. Is the need so great for Nuclear officers and the supply of technical/engineering majors so small that Tier 3 majors are being mandated to Nukes?

    My son wants EOD but is getting a strong impression that he too will be "drafted" into Nukes because of his strong academics and he does not know if he can do anything to about it.

    Thank you for your feed back/recommendations.
     
  2. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    As I recall, only 15 MIDN were billeted into EOD last year our of the USNA, and probably around 20 out of NROTC... and I'll bet about half or more of those served active duty prior to NROTC. That's some pretty stiff competition. Even if your son were not drafted Nuke, would he be among the 20 out of NROTC?
     
  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I would think if your DS is feeling like he will be drafted Nuke, he has a strong inclination from the command. Command is not going to place this idea into their minds unless they believe that from the needs and numbers this might be a bumper crop yr for that field. I am not saying 1 on 1, I am saying mass briefing to the entire class. From there he is looking left and right, mentally playing the numbers against his peers and feels in comparison he will be the one drafted.

    The way it works is the Navy will look at their needs, and they will open/close the spigots for those fields.

    EOD is a small career field. If officers are not leaving they need fewer to come in.

    Our friend's DS is at USNA 12, and this past fall this was his concern. His number 1 choice was UPT, but they were told Nukes was a big factor. He has a very high cgpa at USNA. He got UPT, but everytime I talked to his folks they were stressing out for him because Nukes was his last choice.

    Again, it appears if you take your DS in NROTC, and our friend's DS at USNA this is where they opened up the spigot.

    For candidates, future candidates, posters, and lurkers. This is why people stress before you accept that scholarship, esp. for N/AFROTC you understand in 4 yrs you will owe 4 yrs AD and it may be in a career field you never wanted, but because they asked for 5 choices, you got it.

    ~~~ I stressed N/AFROTC because they must serve AD, it was not meant to offend AROTC, but they have options that the other 2 do not have.

    I want to say whatever happens, I bet he will be happy in the end.
     
  4. basilrathbone

    basilrathbone Member

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    There is a rigorous selection process for EOD. I presume that EOD has a separate selection board for NROTC mids each year (that’s how SEALs do it so I’m making the jump, although I’m guessing here). Even if your son is ranked first in everything in his Unit, he still has to compete nationwide for an EOD spot. I know the list isn’t out yet but does your son know if he is tracking towards getting an EOD Cruise this summer (if he’s a 2/C now)? That would be a good indication for him if he is in the running.

    Rather than ask the percentage of mids getting their first choice (and those numbers are, at times, interpreted loosely), the question I would be asking is if anyone has been selected for EOD from his Unit recently and then figure out what they did to prepare. Since his Unit is very Sub/Nuke focused the leadership may not be specifically in tune with EOD. Instead of going to a generic Navy website or wiki, I would encourage your son to follow up with someone in the EOD community that has a role in training and selection such as the Community Manager in Millington. He should always start with his Unit, though and make the connection to the EOD Community Manager through them first.
     
  5. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    For what is worth...

    In regards to the USMC, you are not assigned your MOS until completion of OCS (Officer Candidate School). I believe every graduating Marine officer is ranked from #1 to ?? on a list known as the lineal list. Factors are academy/ college gpa, OCS rank, evaluations, and who knows what?

    I have always heard that your eventual MOS is not simply a result of your lineal score coming out of school. They break the list into thirds and then select a number of MOS assignments from each grouping.

    This way they don't get all the "top" candidates in one particular MOS. It becomes a blend of the lineal list numbers.
     
  6. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    actually Navy changed that to 5 yrs. AD out of NROTC starting with the freshmen entering in 2009, or 2010, can't remember which, but it is a big change. I did a quick check and it looks like Air Force ROTC, like Army ROTC, is also 4 yrs. minimum, rather than 5. Interesting that NROTC would be the only Department to do that.
     
  7. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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  8. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    It would be interesting to see what the average time in service is for commissioned AROTC cadets given that so many opt for ADSO to better their chances of receiving the branch they want or the Post assignment. With the added 3 years some cadets commit to I would think the average over all would be higher, of course ADSO is voluntary which still leaves the Min. at 4 years for many new Army Lt's.

    As far as AROTC understanding their commitment before accepting a scholarship, while the Army does gives the option of AD or Reserve, the 8 year commitment to Active Reserves is no cake walk either. I agree every applicant needs to understand the level of commitment no matter which service they plan to join.

    It's interesting to learn how the different services handle the Branch and MOS selections, seems like they have all found a way to make it as complicated as possible.
     
  9. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    jcleppe,

    If I understand the power point correctly http://webcache.googleusercontent.c...ing_11_apr_2011.pptx+purdue+rotc+ADSO&ct=clnk

    49% of the non-Aviation cadets branched in FY 11 used ADSO for Branching.

    If we round that to 50%, and do a weighted average, then the average non-aviation AROTC commissioned 2LT has an active duty service obligation of

    5.5 years.

    That number would probably go up two or three tenths if you factor in Post or Educational ADSO contracts.
     
  10. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    That's about what I was guessing, thanks for doing the math.
     

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