NROTC Schools Questione

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by tuba143, Sep 1, 2011.

  1. tuba143

    tuba143 New Member

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    Working with my DS on his NROTC application. One of the requirements is that one of their top three schools be one where they qualify for in state rates. Our state (Illinois) only has one public school that offers NROTC. That school has a student population of over 30K which is about 3 times the size of campus that my son is looking for. Does he have any other choice if our state only offers one school? What happens to a candidate who lives in a state that has no public schools that offer NROTC?
     
  2. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    Tuba143: sending you a PM
     
  3. patentesq

    patentesq Parent

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    tuba143, my recollection from doing this last year and working through similar issues was that it is not optional. You must list a state school. I suppose that you can send an email to your POC, but it will take time to get an answer. Another good source of information is the regional recruiter for your state (this may be out of state). I would call the local Navy recruiter and ask for the contact information of the "NROTC Scholarship Coordinator" (usually a Chief Petty Officer) in charge of your region.

    I wouldn't hold up your application on this. My recommendation is to list the state school and worry about the transfer issues later when your DS receives the scholarship.
     
  4. P-Flying17

    P-Flying17 Member

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    Illinois has a Few Options

    Tuba,

    Your state has several instate options.

    You have the following available to put down as an instate tuition school.

    University of Illinois
    University of Illinois, Chicago
    Parkland College
    Kennedy King College

    Also if your son/daughter were to receive a scholarship he/she would be eligible for instate tuition at any Public Texas School so you can also put the following options if he/she does not want to put down an Illinois School.

    Texas A&M University
    Texas A&M University at Galveston
    University of Texas
    University of Houston
    Texas Southern University
     
  5. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    Yay! P-Flying17 is posting again. The best source of information about the NROTC scholarship "inside perspective".

    Thanks P for your initiative in posting here. Saves a lot of applicants a TON of confusion.
     
  6. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    ALWAYS nice to see P-Flying17 on the forum. She is extremely helpfu!

    I do want to clarify my understanding of your note: You note that a NROTC scholarship winner is eligible for instate tuition at any Public Texas school. Is this true for NROTC scholarship winners from any state? WOW! I never realized that. Are there other states that offer the same benefit to out of staters who win NROTC awards?

    Seems to me that they all should but no one asked. :smile:
     
  7. MJOmom

    MJOmom Member

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    We live in a state without a Navy ROTC program. My son was initially assigned to Arizona (where he hadn't even applied) ... he eventually was changed to Oregon State (first choice) ... along the way, a spot opened at Idaho, which he respectfully declined. So, the bottom line: if there are openings in another state's program, and your state doesn't have a program, it can be done. When we visitied Oregon State (before the scholarship was transfterred), they told us that in-state students had priority because of the lower cost.
     
  8. P-Flying17

    P-Flying17 Member

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    Yes, any ROTC Scholarship student is eligible for instate tuition at any public Texas School.

    There are schools that offer reciprical agreements with other states, but none to the effect that Texas does.

    For instance State University of New York offers instate tuition for residents of Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Washington D.C., Pennsylvania, and Virginia.
    Wisconsin has a reciprocal agreement with Minnesota. Minnesota currently has one with North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

    The Citadel offers to certain counties in Georgia. South Carolina will occassionally offer instate tuition eligible scholarships.

    The best thing to do is call the NROTC Unit at the school you are interested in and ask if that school offers reciprical agreements.

    Some schools offers students who parents are Purple Heart Recipients instate.

    Also if your parents are on Active Duty, find out where they file taxes because that would be a place you would qualify for instate tuition as well.
     
  9. Dolphins2012

    Dolphins2012 Parent

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    Before my DS began the process, I imagined that one would select the school to which one wanted to apply their NROTC scholarship only after the scholarship was awarded (conditioned, of course, upon being accepted and enrolling in that school and it having an NROTC unit). However, it seems that a successful candidate receives a NROTC scholarship to only one NROTC unit from one of the 5 listed in your application. Is this correct? If so, can you do anything to have it applied to another school instead, be it from your original top five list or otherwise?
    Thanks in advance!
     
  10. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    ^ Yes to both, but I'll defer to P-Flying17 to answer that.
     
  11. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Your reading is correct. You can try to transfer it to another school after its been awarded but this is not guaranteed and may even be difficult. The unit might already be filled or there may be other reasons (eg. difference in tuition). You should be able to easily update the schools by calling the regional office prior to the scholarship being awarded.

    Anyway, that's my understanding from following these forums over a year.
     
  12. P-Flying17

    P-Flying17 Member

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    Correct, if you are selected, you can request a school change, though it is not guarenteed to a requested school. The only guarentee is that if you do not get into the school in which you are assigned if selected, the you will be worked with to transfer your scholarship to a school that has availability whether it be one of the top 5 or not. Meaning if you recieve the scholarship and you truly want to utilize it even though you did not get into your assigned school, you will be given the opportunity to, though it may not be a school you originally considered.

    Just a suggestions, but if you dream of going to Harvard or MIT, I highly suggest not putting them as your number one, they are hard to get into. A transfer to these schools if accepted may be easier. Put your safety school first. And keep in mind that some school fill up faster than others, though the other NROTC Affiliated schools are just as great.

    And remember, if you want to possible fly one day, Embry Riddle is not your only option. There are other great schools with great Aviation programs. Look at some of the smaller schools for consideration and don't be deceived by the campus of a school.

    Remember also room and board is not covered by the scholarship. If paying for room and board is going to be a problem even if you receive a scholarship, call the NROTC unit at the school you are interested in and see if the school covers room and board for NROTC students or offers room and boards scholarships if you are selected for a scholarship. There is no list of schools that offer room and board, you have to do your research.
     
  13. Dolphins2012

    Dolphins2012 Parent

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    Great explanation - but it gives rise to another question: I never thought where you went to school had anything to do with your service selection, besides, of course, the general advantage gained by attending a school that offered, and then majoring in, what are now termed "Tier 1" and "Tier 2" subjects. Back in '96, I knew a NROTC mid at my respectable, Jesuit university (I was not in ROTC nor have I ever served) who was an engineering major and has been flying for 20 years, another who was a biology major who is about to take command of a submarine, another who was a poli-sci major now getting ready to command a marine battalion, etc. I guess I do recall high school classmates who went to Univ. of North Dakota, though, because they wanted to fly Air Force (which has an aviation school). Does it really matter that much?
     
  14. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    In terms of what you do in the service, where you go to school doesn't matter too much (except perhaps for quality of education). I suppose that going to an aviation school might give one a leg up in terms of flying but you still have to go thru all the same evaluations, tests, OML ranking etc.

    The schools you list on your NROTC application MAY make a difference on your ability to get in the program either via scholarship or as a College Programmer. For example, the competition may be stiffer with more applicants to say a Virginia Tech vs. a Norfolk State. (Just picking two schools at random and I actually have no idea how they compare to each other. Just saying one is more well known than the other and may attract more applicants. Not trying to cast aspersions anywhere :biggrin:). As a College Programmer there may just not be any slots available at the institution you attend.
     
  15. Mman5247

    Mman5247 Member

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    DD did just opposite of your recommendation

    P-Flying17:

    DD put her dream school first and got it but it is a huge stretch. She's doing EA but I'm wondering if she can get on the wait list for 2nd and 3rd choice schools now. I don't want it to compromise her slot at her first choice school. But we have to be realistic about her chances.
     

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