NROTC to MIT or USNA

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by ltcornmom, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. ltcornmom

    ltcornmom Member

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    My DS was given an appointment to the Academy in September, NROTC scholarship to MIT in October accepted to MIT in December. We are over the moon!!! Now he has a tough decision to make. His plan is to major in electrical/nuclear engineering. He is leaning towards MIT. Is anyone already involved in MIT NROTC that could give us some answers as what to expect. We have visited the school and have looked at the Batallion Web site and have the general info but it would be nice to talk to someone who has already or is currently going through it.

    One of our concerns is oop cost, and how the NROTC scholarship works. Also what about after the 4 years. If you do exceptionally well academically does the Navy allow you to continue your education towards a masters or doctorate???

    He is interested in NUKE school of course but what other options in the way of continuing his education would possibly be available to him??

    Is it more likely for him to be granted the opportunity to attend grad school after completing 4 years at the Academy or 4 years at MIT??

    Sorry so long winded and repetitive but it is a big decision.
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    The scholarship will cover tuition and fees. There will also be a stipend for books plus the normal monthly stipend. None of these monies start flowing until the fitness test is passed and he contracts. Room and Board and other monies will come out of your pockets. There are no out of pocket costs for NROTC itself. They provide all uniforms, equipment, etc.

    I'll leave comments on graduate school to others, but I do know that very few receive the opportunity to do that. There are opportunities to attend graduate school later on but the AD commitment must be extended.

    Hope this helps. If ou can be more specific about any questions you have then perhaps I can be more helpful.
     
  3. ltcornmom

    ltcornmom Member

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    Thanks for responding so quickly.

    If, I should say when, the tuition goes up each year, does NROTC then adjust accordingly, and when you say they give a stipend for books is there a limit as to how much they allow each year??
     
  4. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    First off, congratulations to your son for not one, but two excellent offers. He obviously is a smart kid with big dreams. Having said that, I am thinking he doesn't know what a service academy is really all about. You can get an excellent education in any number of schools across the country---MIT, Princeton, USC, the list goes on and on. The thing you cannot get is a leadership education recognized the world over along with the academics such as at the Academy. It is a 4 year pressure cooker of the likes he has never seen or will experience ever again in his life. He will be trained, tested, pressured, tested, trained over and over again in an atmosphere of clarity and honesty that a civilian school has never duplicated. He will have experienced the longest, most expensive, most extensive, and hardest leadership lab that the military mind can come up with. He will walk out of it miles ahead of his peers.

    He will then be placed.....this is important....as a junior officer leading sailors in combat (and subs come closer to combat than he knows). That is the reason for the Naval Academy. It is not a federal jobs program or a way to build a resume. From that point on he will prove his worth to the Navy and if he is an excellent officer and the Navy wants to keep him, he will most assuredly be offered a masters program somewhere if he is as smart as he appears. I have never heard of a modern day Admiral that does not have a masters. By the way, the same post-grad deal applies to an MIT NROTC graduate---he has to earn his place by being an excellent officer, not an excellent technician.

    I don't want to start the old argument over the merits of NROTC vs USNA but they are not even remotely the same as far as leadership training. One is a pressure cooker 24/7 for 4 years and the other is one day a week. So really, your son needs to decide if he wants a world-class leadership education or not. His call.
     
  5. terp1984

    terp1984 Member

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    Congrats on your sons accomplishments. What type of college experience does your son want? My DS also had a September LOA, applied to MIT but was declined. He did the CVV in February that influenced his decision. He decided on May 1 not to go to the USNA. He never applied to nrotc but was still interested in becoming a naval officer. He walked on as a college programmer and is now on scholarship at a top public university. As far as service selection, there is no advantage given to USNA grads for the various billets. Many will tell you that after 6 months in the fleet it makes no difference where you recieved your commission but how you perform in the fleet. With the academy, you have a large "ringknocker" network built in where from MIT and other programs you will not initially know as many officers. Financially the academy covers room and board where nrotc does not. My son has never regretted his decision. Your son has great offers, my suggestion is to spend a few days at each one then decide. Best of luck.
     
  6. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I don't want to start the age old argument either, but NROTC tests your leadership and presses you far more than one day a week. That being said I certainly agree that USNA is heads and shoulders above NROTC as a leadership pressure cooker. The debate as to which produces better officers is endless. But enough said about that. Just don't want the OP to think NROTC is a one day a week affair. It is far more.
     
  7. NROTC_HOPEFULLY

    NROTC_HOPEFULLY Member

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    If the naval academy is a pressure cooker, surely MIT is too? maybe academic vs military life/leadership... just don't discount the rigor of MIT when making your choice. I would go with MIT for the education and college experience. Maybe you can visit the naval academy for an overnight or something????
     
  8. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    Perhaps, but academically I would count the laurels of MITs engineering over USNA any day. How much will the leadership experience at USNA over NROTC matter 5 years into someone's career? Just curious if there is some graph available or something...

    I think the leadership gained from attending the world's finest engineering program is something speak about as well.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2013
  9. aglages

    aglages Parent

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    Congrats to you and your son!
    You should PM Marciemi, she has two sons at MIT (at least one in NROTC) and also a son at USAFA. I'm sure she'll be able to give you quite a bit of insight.
    Good Luck!:thumb:
     
  10. ltcornmom

    ltcornmom Member

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    aglages

    Thanks I'm not sure if I have enough posts to send a PM but will attempt it. I have seen her posts on other threads and would love to talk to her. If its's possible for you to PM and let her know I am interested in some insight I would appreciate it.

    For as much as I would love my DS to attend the Academy, I believe the academic rigors and ROTC training he will receive at MIT will more than justly help him attain the leadership skills needed to be a Naval Officer. We have visited the Academy on numerous occasions over the past several years, his dad is Navy enlisted, and he has stayed there for STEM, NASS and just recently a CVW. He has spoken and still keeps in touch with a number of mids so he has some insight as what academy life is all about. His decision will not be blindly made albeit still difficult.
     
  11. Stealth_81

    Stealth_81 Super Moderator Moderator Founding Member

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    Marciemi left on a vacation cruise today. I'm sure she will pop in and reply in a week when she returns.

    Stealth_81
     
  12. ltcornmom

    ltcornmom Member

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    Thanks for letting me know. I'll wait to hear from her
     
  13. dlee96

    dlee96 Member

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    ltcornmom-
    would you be willing to share your son's stats? I would love to learn from an MIT worthy application
     
  14. c2m3m

    c2m3m Member

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    MIT vs. USNA. If he's not already convinced that the academy is for him, then he should go MIT. Rep: USNA is excellent but MIT is the best. That will help him for the rest of his life. Graduate education is expected of all Naval Officers. Everyone I know has one. You can take an unpaid leave of absence after graduation to do your graduate work, but why? I'd go on active duty for 3 years, then have the Navy pay for your graduate work, while also getting paid 80K+ as a Naval Officer. You'll have to serve 2 years for every year of grad school as payback. Could be at civilian grad schools or at the Naval Postgraduate School. Some JO's get their masters while working at NROTC instructors (usually free tuition). Others use their Post 9/11 GI Bill. See the VA website. It covers everything 100% if you choose schools wisely. As an MIT grad, he might be able to get an Olmstead Scholarship. Getting paid while earning a free graduate degree overseas. What's not to love? Go to the Navy's official site for details on these graduate programs. Navy Personnel Command > Career Info > Education > Graduate Education
     
  15. nuensis

    nuensis USNA 2016

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    All of the points you've mentioned in this post is also applicable to USNA, you know.
     
  16. ltcornmom

    ltcornmom Member

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    Thanks for all the info. We are still looking into the MIT option even though the Medical Waiver was denied for NROTC.

    As for his stats he is 1 out of 617 in his class
    4.47 GPA
    SAts 800 Math, 710 CR
    Varsity Track (captain) 4 years
    numerous extracurricular and volunteer service activities
     
  17. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    Sorry to hear that. Was a Waiver granted for USNA?
     
  18. marciemi

    marciemi USMA Alumnus

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    ltcornmom - sorry on the delay. As others stated (thanks guys!), I was at sea (the fun way!) and didn't have phone or internet access (not necessarily a bad thing at times!) and am just starting to catch up!

    I'll be glad to talk with you about whatever I can share. As stated, my middle son is in NROTC at MIT and also chose between there and USNA. Older son is at USAFA (but spending this semester at West Point). Youngest is at MIT with no interest in the military. :rolleyes:

    If you want to email me, you can use rjohnson87 (at) new.rr.com. It's my old email that'll be going away soon (or so they say), but I can give you my new one from there which I'd rather not post publicly. Was your son waivered for USNA? Kind of surprises me that it would go that way instead of the other way around! I can give you the contacts of the people at MIT though who might be able to fight for that waiver for him though if he does decide to attend there. And also get your son in touch with my son (who loves to talk to anyone and is in a down month at MIT now just doing boot camp and Zumba!).

    Looking forward to hearing from you and congrats and best of luck to your son! Also, have you found our MIT 2017 Parents Group? I'm not sure if I'm allowed to link to it here (got in trouble for that on College Confidential) but I can get you added in there too if you aren't yet!
     
  19. marciemi

    marciemi USMA Alumnus

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    I should also read the OP before responding. :redface: As far as grad school, a lot of that at MIT depends on your major. In any case, it's definitely likely, but whether it would be right after graduation or a few years down the road would depend on the field. This year they have I think 2 folks (out of about 8 who graduated from MIT NROTC last year) who just stayed to complete a 5th year program (Masters) in Computer Science/Engineering (EECS there). In this field or Mechanical Engineering it's very likely. My son is a Chem Engr major and they adamantly will not accept students to grad school right out of undergrad from MIT so he knows he'll be going to the fleet first and getting some experience before he considers grad school. I could ask him about Nuclear Engineering if that's what your son is considering, but of course a lot of it will depend on his grades/class ranking (both GPA and military) as well.
     
  20. ltcornmom

    ltcornmom Member

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    Thanks Marciemi, I sent you an email
     

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