Nurse Option ROTC Ed delay

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by alpha2716, Oct 12, 2015.

  1. alpha2716

    alpha2716 Member

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    Ok I understand it's challenging to get an educational delay in rotc. I want to be a doctor. What if I did the ROTC nurse Option and applied for an educational delay to medical school. That way I could still try and get an educational delay but if I'm not granted the delay I can still spend the next 4 years doing something I like (nursing).

    So basically this is the breakdown. Get ROTC scholarship for nursing. Senior year apply for a educational delay to med school. If I get the delay GREAT. If I don't at least I can be a nurse for the next 4 years and do something I'm interested in. Is this a good plan, or would I have a better chance at getting a delay if I just did regular ROTC and just took the gamble of getting the delay. Basically which one has the higher chance of getting the delay the nurse Option ROTC or the regular rotc, or is it all equal chances.
     
  2. alpha2716

    alpha2716 Member

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    Or is nursing rotc specifically designed to create military nurses and there is no chance of getting an educational delay to med school if you do this option.
     
  3. FFDDG

    FFDDG Member

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    NROTC Nurse purpose is to prepare for service as a Navy Nurse. Not sure on the Ed Delay part. Keep in mind that getting a nurse NROTC scholarship is not a slam dunk. Last couple of years I believe only 16 were awarded nationally.
     
  4. Ghaz

    Ghaz Member

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    I know that in Army ROTC you specifically cannot apply for Ed Delay as a nurse.
     
  5. Klone

    Klone Member

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    I am trying to do something along the same lines, nursing major in AFROTC. What I've gotten from cadre is essentially every commissioned officer is expected to go to graduate school as they move up in ranking. So while you might not get the Ed Delay, serving for 4 years active (as a nurse) you should be around the rank of Captain. I don't see why you wouldn't be able to go back to school regardless of being a nurse or not prior.
     
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Klone,
    I would not agree with that at all, at least for the AF.

    Yes, they expect you to earn a graduate degree, but the fact is very, very few are sent to a graduate school during their career. Think in the number of less than 25%, and more like 10-15%. The majority complete their grad school fulfillment using the education department on base using tuition assistance. Every base has several universities associated with them, ERAU, UMD, Webster, etc.
    ~ I think you are misunderstanding what they meant. They meant to make rank, they expect you to have a grad degree. However, you heard that they will send you to grad school at some point which is false.
    ~~ Grad school is "masked" until at least your O4 board, but historically it has been masked until the O5 board. IE @14/15 years into your career. The twist is for O4 Professional Military Education (PME) in residence selection, grad school will not be masked, thus, most officers try to get it done before their O4 board so they can compete for that school.
    ~~~ Bullet was rated, and I can count on 2 hands the amount of people we knew throughout his career that was sent to grad school in residence. Most will do it straight out of college, because stepping out during your career can be a problem from a career progression aspect. While you are a student, your peers are gaining more experience in operational leadership positions.

    Secondly, the OP is not looking for Grad school, but for Medical school, which is not a year long program. It is several years. The ED they are looking at is akin to applying for a JAG ED. It is for a specific career field that they will not have upon completing that degree. It is not as if they were going nursing and decide they want to go ED to get a Master degree in health administration.

    For the OP, from the AF view they hand out specific ROTC scholarships, such as nursing because manpower at HQ has decided from long term planning that they will be short on nurses for the next 5 years. The scholarship is to recruit those degrees. This can be a double edge sword. You may believe you have a higher chance of getting the scholarship, but you also maybe now tied for the 4 years upon active duty to that career. Plus, if you decide while in the program that this is not for you, you will need HQs approval to convert the scholarship. Chances maybe high that they say no.
    ~ Remember that ROTC grads can wait several months before they go AD. The commitment owed clock will not start until you show up at your 1st assignment.
    ~~ You will actually have 3 dates tied to you. The commission date is your longevity date (pay/retirement). They will than take your report date, and commission date to find an avg date for making rank(line number). IE my DS commissioned in May. He reported in Sept. When you look at DFAS pay chart. He gets the bump in pay for years, but due to the averaging for rank, his date is July for making rank. SA commissioned officers are considered AD immediately upon graduation. They basically have only 1 date...graduation.

    Finally, I agree that it is not a slam dunk. There was a poster here that their DD did the AFROTC nursing scholarship. I believe she commissioned in 13. Her 1st week at Brooks for training, they were told that the AF is starting to step away from ADAF nursing, instead they were trending towards more contracted nurses. They would always have ADAF nurses, but from a fiscal cost, it was cheaper to contract them. Mainly because they don't have to move them, nor have to pay out retirement bennies. PCSing a member costs a lot of money. Just the moving truck within the continental US could be 10K. Sending them from Germany to California is insanely expensive (car, airfare, movers, dislocation allowance, travel allowance, etc).

    Good luck. I am with the others if you want to be a doc, than don't go nursing. I would probably try for a degree in bio-chem. I would suggest if you want a scholarship from AF or Navy you look at what major will be considered STEM/TECH. My DS is not ROTC, but he is a bio-chem major and his intention is to work in a lab for pharmaceutical companies. This may allow you to work in the medical field in the military, but not necessarily as a nurse, probably more in the administration field if you do not get an ED.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2015
  7. USN16x

    USN16x Member

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    I am always a little confused when people say they will pursue a nursing degree and then go to med school but hey it's your life! As Pima said the AF is shying away from AD nurses this is the same for the Army (and navy) as well it is getting very difficult to commission as an AD nurse at this time. If your end goal is the go to med school and serve as a military doc I would suggest not doing rotc and focusing on getting into med school first and then doing a direct commission. Not to say that it can't be done with rotc, but it will just be a lot more difficult. Goodluck!
     
    Capt MJ and Pima like this.
  8. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    OP, as always, the "needs of the (Service)" will drive all.
    If you want to be a military MD, then I recommend looking for the most direct path with the best percentage of success, with the least chance of being diverted to something the Service needs you for.
    Contact the recruiters who work with the Health Professionals Scholarship Programs and get the info direct from them.
    The comments about AD nurses are spot on. When I visit Walter Reed NMMC, the nurses I chat with are more often civil service or contract. Saves personnel dollars and overhead.
     
  9. ginko

    ginko Member

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    My DS is in AROTC. He was awarded a 3 year scholarship and just started at his university. Over the past couple of years he decided he loves medicine. He loves the rigor of the classes and the mechanics of the human systems. Watching him enjoy these classes made my day because I have a pre-med degree and gave up med school for teaching so I could focus on raising my family. My son wants to be in the Army. He gave a lot of thought to pursuing an M.D. instead of nursing but decided that he may not get to serve if he goes to medical school. ...he would logically need to give up ROTC. This choice did not appeal to him. He is now trying to decide if he should apply to nursing school a year early since his grades are good and he has prerequisites done. To resolve my disappointment, I made him promise he would pursue a graduate nursing degree. He is a problem solver and I feel he should be a diagnostician. I think if you love medicine and you want to serve, there is a place for you.
     
  10. Sampia

    Sampia Member

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    Ginko, has your DS looked into the Physician's Assistant field? Quite a lot of options there but none, I believe, in the military. It would be something to pursue after
     
  11. k2rider

    k2rider Member

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    I don't know about PA slots but my understanding is that is that there are Nurse Practicioner opening in the Army. My daughter is entertaining the idea of going that route in a couple years.
     
  12. k2rider

    k2rider Member

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    I'm not sure if it's absolutely "required* but if you want to make Captain in the Nursing Corps, it's in your best interest to get back to school for your Masters degree. I know my daughter's co-workers that just made Captain had all been back to school already for their Masters degrees. It's my understanding that it's about the (4) year mark when the Captain's promotion will come up.
     
  13. Sampia

    Sampia Member

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    In the civilian world, a masters degree in nursing is good, depending on the type of nursing you want to do. Working in an office alongside a doctor, seeing their own patients, teaching, research, etc. very rarely are they "on the foor" doing the direct patient care. More money. Better hours, usually. I personally never had an interest in it because I wanted to be "on the front line "so to speak, doing hands-on care. I wanted to be beside my patients when they were sick and needed someone. My advice would be to think about the long road. If the plan is to stay in the military as a career, go for the degree. If they will be re-entering the civilian world as a nurse, the degree can make a big difference in the type of nursing. I have never known a Masters level nurse to work on the floor. I suppose she or he could.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2015
  14. ginko

    ginko Member

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    I believe Army has a PA program at Brooks in San Antonio. They move soldiers up from medic slots, not nursing. We have done a good deal of research on the matter. He can pursue many options in the nursing field. It is so diverse. I encouraged him to get in there and see what he likes and then specialize in that. He could go ER, FNP, CRNA, psyche, flight specialty.... the options are numerous. He could even decide to go to medical school after he serves. Personally, I hope he's good at placing IV s. The Army has two of the best CRNA programs in the USA. So, that means the best in the world, of course. :usa:
     
  15. k2rider

    k2rider Member

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    The options might be numerous but availability is totally another matter. When you are getting set to graduate, you get to turn in a "wish list" of locations you would prefer to be assigned to. You have pretty much NO choice on what field you are assigned to as far as ER vs Psych vs ?? After 18 months, you can put for the training to be able to work in the ICU but with the nursing shortages as they area, it's a tough slot to get. **For the most part**, at least from what my daughter is experiencing and seeing at Brooks (now SAMMC), you can pretty much expect to be at your initial assignment your first (4) years....which will see your son thru his ROTC commitment. My daughters proctor (trainer) has been in (4) years now and never left SAMMC. She was training my daughter when she had (3) years in the Army. She just made Captain, wants to do a full career with the Army and doesn't plan on leaving SAMMC if she has her choice. She was also just chosen for a specialty school but I'm not sure which one.

    My daughter has been at Brooks for 12 months now after reporting to BOLC last July 1st. She has been on her own since February after (4) months of training and was already the Charge Nurse on her floor last month. Luckily for her, she was assigned to a "step down" floor which is where the patients come after leaving ICU. It's the busiest floor in the hospital and SAMMC is the 2nd busiest hospital in the system.
     
  16. ginko

    ginko Member

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    Thank you for the insight! I will let him know how those ropes are set up! I still don't see how he can go wrong with nursing. Worst case scenario, he's starting grad school at 26, after his ROTC committment.
     
  17. Klone

    Klone Member

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    @Pima I'm confused now, I was offered a type 7 Afrotc, majoring in nursing. However I turned down the scholarship since if I took it the four years of active duty following commissioning would not go towards the GI bill. My plan is to go back to graduate school following the 4 years to get my masters to be a CRNA. Would the military not cover those years of graduate school?
     
  18. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    While you are ADAF you are eligible for TA (tuition assistance) They will pay 75% of your tuition, but you owe a concurrent commitment. It is a different program than the GI. I do not know if your master degree would work with the TA program depending on where you are assigned to once ADAF.
     
  19. Klone

    Klone Member

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    @Pima would the four years of service after rotc not cover my masters degree?
     
  20. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Honestly, I do not have the answer to that question. Bullet never used his GI Bill. I know the GI Bill has changed in the past years. I do know that our cousin used his GI Bill for law school, but I really don't know the details. Our DS is a pilot, thus since he owes a decade back he will be using TA for his grad degree.

    I am interested to see what the answer is because it seems strange to me that they said you cannot use the GI bill because you owe 4 years back for the scholarship. It makes no sense because as a 300 AFROTC cadet you will be contracted and agree to owe 4 years back upon arriving at your 1st base. Additionally, are they saying the same thing to SA grads that owe back 5 years upon commissioning? They spent a lot more on those grads than they do on any ROTC scholarship cadet.
     

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