Over the maximum weight requirement?

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by 3QConcerns, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. 3QConcerns

    3QConcerns Member

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    So the maximum weight for my height is 202 lbs. I'm trying to get to about 210-220 lbs for the 94 kg weightlifting class.

    Here's the thing--weightlifters aren't the leanest of people. They're not chubsters either (unless you're a super heavyweight), but there's a good chance I'll be over the 20% bodyfat requirement.

    Is there any way out of this? I also want to gain some extra weight in preparation for basic, so I don't lose everything during BCT. I understand why they would have the requirement and how physical fitness is imperative to survival at the Academy, but even if I'm a little over, I'll still be pretty damn strong (and I have a fairly decent mile for my weight). If anything, it will help me, not hinder.

    So is it just by the books, and anyone who is 202 lbs+ and over 20% gets thrown out?

    The Academy has both weightlifting and powerlifting clubs, so it seems like they'd be sympathetic to the issue (given that both sports favor people who are pretty heavy for their height). What's my best course of action?
     
  2. cadet15

    cadet15 Member

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    They will do a tape test to determine your body percentage. If you really are over both weight and percentage, they will put you on a remedial program which has its own set of rules and regulations. I know that certain IC's can get weight waivers, but I am not sure if LOS status cadets for powerlifting can. I wouldn't worry too much about it because they are not just going to throw you out without giving you a chance to prove yourself.
     
  3. YorkieMom75

    YorkieMom75 Member

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    Lose Weight

    Start a serious running program, and you will lose weight. A lot of times, weightlifters aren't good at PT, especially running. A running program will help you with both weight loss and fitness. DO NOT try to gain anymore wight!

    This has also been an issue for my son, who played football and was on the powerlifting team. Since he won't be playing USAFA football (I bet those guys are over the weight limit too, or does USAFA have a skinny offensive line?), he needs to work on improving fitness for future PT tests and be physically prepared for BCT in the high altitude. :smile:

    PT and fitness are very important during summer training. During the year, you'll take several PT tests, and the challenge during the academic year is that you have to train on your own time.

    If you already have an appointment, see if you can contact the powerlifting coach. Ask him for advice.
     
  4. mustang10

    mustang10 Member

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    Overweight and underweight basics get a daily dose of ensure or some equivalent to keep them from losing too much weight in BCT. Some big guys wouldn't drink it to lose the weight on purpose, but they'd take heat for not maintaining healthy weight loss when they got weighed each week (NBD). You only got weighed each week if you were "in the zone" that the docs were worried about. As a club the power-lifters may not get the waiverable weight requirements like the ICs, but you only get height and weight measurements once a semester at the beginning of the semester. Many non IC big guys make the H&W at the measurement, and then as long as they pass the pft nobody cares what they weigh unless they bust the buttons off their uniform.
     
  5. 3QConcerns

    3QConcerns Member

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    Okay, this sounds great. I'll just take the heat, I guess.

    I mean, if I actually make it to 220 lbs (I'm 195 or so right now), the whole idea is it that it would be a buffer so that during BCT, I won't end up under 200 lbs. Ideally, I want to be about 210 lbs (since 94 kg is just about 207 lbs, and you want to be slightly higher). So I'll arrive a bit chubby and lose the baby fat during BCT, if all goes well.
     
  6. 3QConcerns

    3QConcerns Member

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    When you say remedial, do they actually restrict how much food you get to eat?
     
  7. cadet15

    cadet15 Member

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    It depends on your squadron. my squad doesn't have a light table, so they don't restrict, but you do have to weigh in every month until you meet requirements, but it varies by squad because many others do have light tables. Honestly, worry more about fitness at this point and the weight will be dealt with accordingly when the time comes.
     
  8. 3QConcerns

    3QConcerns Member

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    Okay, thanks a ton for the valuable information. I haven't been able to get a straight answer on this for weeks.
     
  9. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    Ok, here's my opinion...DO NOT plan to fail! Intentionally being out of height weight limits is poor planning. You WILL eventually need to meet them...you don't just get to ignore inconvenient regs.

    Trying to bulk-up for BCT is also a bad plan. You will lose weight. Adding to your normal caloric requirements beforehand is not going to help you. It will slow you down and make you feel miserable during BCT...well, even more so than if you didn't....
     
  10. AFAYahoo

    AFAYahoo Member

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    When my son went through BCT last summer, the comments he made about the kids that struggled the most were invariably those who were on the heavier side of the height weight limits. And if you struggle, you're likely to garner more "attention" from the cadre (upperclassmen) running BCT. No one wants special attention from cadre, believe me. And during the school year, those who don't pass the PFT or AFT are put on recondo--basically extra exercise, running, etc. in addition to the normal training that your squadron does. Not only is it tough, but its one more thing to do during the day, on top of classes, studying, briefings, squadron training, etc etc. You say you have a pretty decent mile for a big guy but how about after you've done zillions of pushups, flutter kicks, pullups etc.? I'd shoot for coming in to BCT in the best shape possible, not worrying about gaining weight.
     
  11. goldenlion

    goldenlion Member

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    Don't gain any more weight!!! You want to start out as fit as possible. Weighing less will help you on the longer runs at altitude, with pullups (and help the person that is helping you do pullups), with sit ups, with pushups, etc.

    You want to look like the average Joe as much as possible; it will draw a lot less attention your way.

    Additionally, you can be kicked out of the military for not meeting weight standards. You don't want to start your military career on a weight management program. It is one extra stress that you don't need.

    And if you are afraid that you will lose weight during the summer, don't!! They will monitor you closely. If you starting losing too much weight, they will make sure you consume more calories.
     
  12. Packer

    Packer Member

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    Is your number one priority to be a weight lifter or an AF officer? Just something to think about.
     
  13. 3QConcerns

    3QConcerns Member

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    And I will meet them, especially after the expected BCT weightloss (I'd like to be higher than the 202 lbs allowed, and just shoot for under 20% bodyfat).

    I've read a lot of stories about people in previous years losing 15 lbs+, and I just don't want to lose all the hard work I've put into weightlifting over the past few months. This isn't some huge act of defiance or plan for failure; it's a few extra pounds (and I may even be below the 20% bodyfat) that'll help me maintain the progress I've made so far.

    It should probably be made clear that a good 8-10 lbs of what I plan to gain is going to be muscle! I will be stronger, and it may be the case that it will put me in a better position to succeed. With my rigorous lifting schedule, there's a chance I'll never even be able to get above 20% bodyfat (and if I do, I'll probably be very close). I have a very hard time gaining weight already, so actually getting to 220 lbs in the next 4 months is probably pretty unlikely. I'll be between 205-210 lbs, and probably below the 20% if I'm there. I just wanted to make sure that if I did go a little higher, I'd be okay for BCT.

    So please, let's not get ahead of ourselves questioning whether I want to be an AF Officer or weightlifter! I assure you the former is more important, but if I can work in weightlifting into my time at the Academy, it'd make my experience there all the better.
     
  14. skt

    skt Member

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    losing weight

    If you make an effort not to lose weight during BCT, you probably won't. If you're over a certain height or weight (under as well I think) you'll be given Boost or Ensure to supplement your diet. For athletic/IC reasons, my son also didn't want to lose weight during BCT. He met the "over 6 foot" requirement - I don't recall what the weight requirements were - so he was provided supplements and drank all they would provide. And, he ate the food that was provided - whether or not it was his favorite. He actually gained about 8 pounds during BCT. Other cadets he knew would not drink the supplements or eat all their food because they didn't like the taste or just weren't hungry - but if you're a weight-lifter, you probably aren't prone to turning away nutrition. By the way, my son has now made an effort to lose that added weight and is actually stronger - just has a lower body fat percentage. And, he's faster, which helps on the AFT.
     
  15. lsredmond

    lsredmond Member

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    Don't expect to automatically loose weight during BCT. My daughter was actually commended for not loosing weight during the second half of Basic Training, BCT2, at Jacks Valley. I think she built muscle while loosing fat and that didn't show up on the scales.
     
  16. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    It's your decision...just realize that height/weight issues wind up negatively affecting people quite frequently.
     
  17. hornetguy

    hornetguy USAFA Cadet

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    Oh we will. Basic is going to change your body. I had football friends who went from football shape to track shape. It was inevitable based on the regime in Basic. Doesn't matter if you add weight, your body is going to catabolize that extra muscle you won't be using in Basic exercises. Extra body fat does not buffer against that, especially if you've trained your body to be used to extra calories.

    Regardless, yes, I understand you want to powerlift and that's your hobby. Plenty of AF officers do the same thing. It's a short period you don't get to have your way. Risking your career for a few months of loss is silly and myopic. Trim yourself and prepare for basic and to be within the regulations. After you finish and you have the time to lift again, rebuild then. You know the military involves sacrifice, it won't be the only one you make.
     
  18. Stealth_81

    Stealth_81 Super Moderator Moderator Founding Member

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    Not always true.

    My son was a powerlifter in high school. Four trips to State and three trips to Nationals and he was 5'11 and 148 lbs. He had about 3% body fat. He actually gained 8 pounds during BCT.

    I guess I really don't understand why you would possibly want to gain weight before BCT and doolie year. As a powerlifter, you would want to be in the lowest weight class possible for your strength. My son could have lifted at 165 lbs, but always kept his weight below 148 because he had a better advantage in the lower class.

    You will need to get through BCT before you even begin to think about the powerlifting team. I think that the extra weight would be putting completion of BCT in jeopardy, and if you don't make it through BCT there will be no chance at the USAFA powerlifting team.

    Our son was on the USAFA powerlifting team, and one of the best memories that I have of his time at the Academy was going to watch him compete at the Tri-Services Invitational at USNA. It is a large commitment to be on the team. In fact, our son dropped powerlifting after his doolie year because it became too much and he didn't want his academics to suffer. I think that you need to consider the long term goal of becoming and Air Force officer rather than a very short-term goal of gaining weight. Listen to what most of the people on here have told you.

    Stealth_81
     
  19. AFrpaso

    AFrpaso USAFA '17

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    Also, the AF loves runners. That is why 60% of your official PT test score comes from the run.
     
  20. 3QConcerns

    3QConcerns Member

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    Your height will pretty much dictate the class you'll be most competitive in. If you're tall, you can compete in a middleweight class, but you're at a huge disadvantage since there'll be people a good 5" shorter than you using that extra weight (that you spend on height) for strength.

    And I'm talking Olympic weightlifting, not powerlifting (although I guess it's relatively the same). So, to be candid, I think your son should've been in the 181 lb class (I think that's a powerlifting class...I don't know that much about the sport) or heavier. In Olympic weightlifting, since it's an Olympic sport, it's pretty easy to see height-class trends. Olympians of my height (slightly over 6') are generally 105 kg or 105 kg+ (so 230 lbs or higher).

    Anyway, I think I've gained enough information from you guys from both sides of the issue. I guess as a final reassurance, I should stress the fact that I'm also running like a madman twice a week in preparation for BCT (making fat gain yet another difficulty) and for both running tests on the fitness test I did above average.

    So I think I won't quite go for the 210 lbs+, and if I do go past 202 lbs, I'll make sure I stay under the 20% bodyfat. It's probably best to make my entry into USAFA as problem-free as possible. But I do plan, at the very least, to be 202 lbs.
     

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