Permanently DQ for guard what about ROTC?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by YellowJeepGuy, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. YellowJeepGuy

    YellowJeepGuy New Member

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    Ok let me give you some background information. I was born with high frequency hearing loss. When I turned 18 I signed up for the Army National Guard. I went to MEPS and passed everything with fling colors got a 84 on my ASVAB, but I failed my hearing test. I was classified as a H2. My recruiter said it's not a big deal will send in a waiver and everything should be good. My unit accepted me 19D but after waiting 3 months my hearing waiver came back denied permanently DQ. My recruiter was shocked, but there was nothing he could help me with after that. I don't understand why it came back PDQ instead of just DQ I'm only a H2 not a H3 or H4. Anyway I will be attending College in a couple weeks and I joined the ROTC program I'm not on contract. I talked to the Col and explained the situation I'm in and he said just stick with the program and will see how you do and the summer after your sophomore year you can go to Dodmerb. Well my question to you guys is when I go to Dodmerb will I even be allowed to test or are they going to say no you failed Meps? I know the Meps physical is only valid for 2 years, well by the time I go to Dodmerb after my sophomore year it will be more then two years. I want nothing more then to serve my country and follow in my Grandfathers footsteps.
     
  2. JMS

    JMS Member

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    In my opinion (worth every cent you paid for it) is that you are doing the right thing in speaking with the ROTC command. However, they have nothing invested until you contract, so their level of interest is modest, I suspect.
    I expect you will be given a DODMERB physical, but it seems doubtful from your description that the results for hearing will be any different. I am not sure, but it seems probable that the stds for an officer may be even more onerous than for enlisted.
    So, what is plan B? I wish you well. It is clear you have goals, and that is a good thing. Please invest a bit of time thinking through what direction you will take toward your goals if this door is closed. I am sincere in hoping that you are at a school that you want and can afford if ROTC is not an option.
     
  3. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Keep in mind that this advice is free and I'm just a parent who has been hanging on these boards for a couple years. The services are generally more stringent about medical conditions with respect to officers than they are with enlisted. That being said, one thing that can contribute to a waiver is your value to the service and how badly they need you. During the Iraq surge waivers and commissions were more easy to obtain for that reason. If you review these forums you will see that some folks are granted waivers for a condition while some are not. This may, in part, be due to the seriousness of the condition but one's value to the service is also relevant.

    You are correct to question what you are being told as you may end up investing two years of your life while still not achieving your goals. Notice that I did not say wasting two years of your life to no purpose. There is a purpose - to serve as an officer which is your goal. And in any case I do not feel it would be wasted as you'll have an opportunity to shape your life and leadership skills through ROTC. You will learn things that will always be of value.

    If you can live with not trying to achieve your goal, because it wasn't important enough to you, then I suggest you not bother with ROTC. OTOH, if you really want this and can live with failing to achieve your goal through no fault of your own, and you see value in spending the two years doing so in any case, then I would say go for it... but be prepared to work hard and show your value.

    You will certainly have to do some soul searching to achieve your decision. Folks like me can provide input but ultimately there are no guarantees and it will be a decision you make on your own. Good luck! :thumb:
     
  4. YellowJeepGuy

    YellowJeepGuy New Member

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    Well thank you for the words of encouragement. I think if they allow me to re-test I can pass. When I took the hearing test at Meps I thought if I pushed the button and there was no tone it would count against me. From talking to the Col he said the worst thing that can come from doing Rotc is you learn leadership and make a few friends. Even if I can't commission the things I learned from ROTC I can apply to my career after college. Joining is my dream and if there is a slight possibility that I still can get in then I'm going to go for it. Living on a prayer.
     
  5. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Great attitude, Best of luck with everything.
     
  6. YellowJeepGuy

    YellowJeepGuy New Member

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    Does anyone know if they will let me re test for sure? I would like to thank the parents who posted a reply but any members that work for DoDMERB know?
     
  7. gojack

    gojack ....

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    You may have already read this?

    Audiologyonline.com


    Question

    I have a patient who is a rising senior in high school. He is very interested in pursuing a career in the military. However, he has bilateral high frequency hearing loss. This prompts my question: What criteria are used by the military to determine eligibility for service? I have always understood that a candidate must pass a military physical and that normal hearing acuity is required. Are their exceptions? I would like to have someone answer and address these questions.

    Answer

    The Dept. of Defense has minimal fitness standards that must be met in order to enter military service. Waivers for hearing loss are not granted by USAF, although hearing loss may be waived by other services on very rare occasion. Consideration for waiver of hearing loss depends on the nature of the loss, severity of loss, and the military job that is being sought by the applicant (e.g., someone with hearing loss could not be a pilot, or work in jobs requiring acute hearing). Typically, hearing loss is waived for difficult-to-fill professional positions such as physician, nurse, lawyer, etc.

    The standards for induction are ''Audiometric average threshold for each ear of not more than 25 dB at 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz, with no individual level greater than 30 dB. And, hearing threshold cannot exceed 45 dB at 4000 Hz for either ear.''

    David W. Chandler, Ph.D., is a Colonel in the US Army, and has been an Army audiologist for 26 years. Currently, he is Director of the Army Audiology & Speech Center (AASC) at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The AASC, established in 1947, is the Department of Defense's largest and most diverse center for evaluation, rehabilitation and research in disorders of speech-language, hearing and balance. The center provides a wide range of clinical diagnostic and rehabilitative services for more than 20,000 patients a year with communication and balance disorders. The AASC also has a Research Section of 12 scientists and support personnel, maintaining an average of 24 ongoing research protocols in the field of communication disorders.

    Additionally, Dr. Chandler serves as Consultant to The Army Surgeon General for Audiology and Hearing Conservation, holds a PhD in Hearing Science from Vanderbilt University, board certification from the American Board of Audiology and the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology.
    -david chandler

    David Chandler, PhD
    Colonel in the US Army
     

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