Personal Connections to Senator?

Discussion in 'Nominations' started by futurecadet, Sep 3, 2012.

  1. futurecadet

    futurecadet Member

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    One of my uncles happens to personally know one of the senators I am applying to for a nomination. He has offered to write that senator a letter on my behalf, but I am unsure if this is a wise idea. Would it actually have an effect on my chances of a nomination? Or are such things frowned upon because they are not equal-opportunity and not part of the official application?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    This is one of those catch-22's. I think everyone knows somebody who knows somebody of importance. And when it comes to getting into the academy, applicants will do almost anything to gain that edge; and parents will do just about anything to help their child obtain their dream. But at the same time, we all want the satisfaction to know we did it on our own. That when the dust settles, we got in ON OUR OWN! Based on our own accomplishments.

    In our small state, it's not uncommon to know a lot of influential people. Including senators and representatives. Matter of fact, when my son was applying to the academy in 2007 we happen to be invited to a friend's home where Ann Romney was coming to visit and help in her husband's 2008 presidential primary run. Our senators were there as well as a lot of other people. Many whom we knew personally. Those who we didn't know personally, we had personal friends introducing us. Our son was with us. Some might even believe that we were "Pimping" our son to all those influential people.

    We were so GLAD when my son received an early appointment using his presidential nomination. It was appointed at the end of October of 2007 and he received the official BFE appointment the first week of November. He was also a recruited athlete, HOWEVER, he received the early appointment prior to being recruited for football. This put so many issues to rest. No one could suggest that ANYONE was able to get my son into the academy EXCEPT HIMSELF. He didn't receive MOC nominations. (They offered, but he already had the appointment, so they held the nominations for others in the state). We had individuals writing LOR's that were tied directly to the senators, Representative, and Governor. Again; none of these were needed or used because he already had his appointment. And no one could say that his athletics gave him an unfair edge in receiving an appointment over more "Qualified" applicants, because he became a recruited athlete AFTER receiving his appointment. So for us, knowing how favoritism, politics, and relationships play a role in everyday life; no one can dispute the fact that my son made it into the academy 100% on his own merit, efforts, and hard work. That made him very happy. It also made it very convenient when someone brings up the subject of the best not necessarily getting an appointment because of athletics or favoritism. The pride on my son's face "After the excitement", knowing that HE got into the academy ON HIS OWN EFFORTS, was priceless.

    But this brings us back to you. When applying to the academies, this is NOT the time to be HUMBLE and MODEST about your accomplishments. But there is a fine line between proud/accomplished and arrogant. If you believe that you are the best or one of the best in your district and/or state, then you probably won't have any problem finding influential individuals (That your MOC requests) to provide you with letter of recommendations. Most MOC's have a type of LOR that they are looking for. MOST say from someone OTHER than a relative. Some asks for a teacher, classmate, employer, principal, coach, etc... If your MOC specifically asks for an LOR from someone OTHER than a family member, and you have your uncle write one because he personally knows the senator, then that would be in poor taste. However, that's not to say that you don't know someone else that knows you and also the senator who could write you a nice LOR. On the other hand; maybe your MOC's don't stipulate WHO can write the LOR's. In which case, a family member who is a mutual/personal friend of the senator could be allowed. But then you have to decide if it's what you want or not. Other than the senator giving you a nomination or not, no one else will ever know if a particular LOR did it for you or if you did it on your own merit. Again; this is something only you can answer and decide. Also, Remember; EVERY Appointee HAS a NOMINATION; but NOT EVERY NOMINEE receives an APPOINTMENT. Getting the nomination is the first part. And unless your MOC uses the "Principal" nomination method, a nomination doesn't guarantee you an appointment.

    I would suggest however that if you do include your uncle's LOR to the senator, that you include a WHOLE LOT MORE LOR's from all the available sources that you MOC allows, and that they be just as meaningful. This way, your uncle's LOR to the senator won't seem so much of a "Consideration" and simply another letter "Validating" the comments of the OTHER LOR's being provided. Best of luck in your decision and your application.
     
  3. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    This.

    LORs from relatives are discouraged, for obvious reasons.

    The Senator may choose to not nominate you to avoid any appearance of cronyism from his personal relationship with your uncle.
     
  4. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I agree, many MOC's state that the LOR's are not to come from family. I would look and see if it does state that on the application.

    One thing to realize is most MOC's never see the applications, they have a nom committee that reviews all of the applicants. Think about it logically it would take hours and hours, if not days for your Sen to read through every single LoR submitted by every applicants (hundreds of LoRs). It would not be a wise way to utilize their time.

    Personally I would stay with traditional LoR's where they highlight everything you have done and not a family member. Again, think about it, the nom committee reads the letter let's say they see that your uncle has the same last name as you do, but does not know their connection to the Sen., it probably will raise eyebrows of why this applicant used a family member. They may think, is that the best the kid could do is get a family member to write a rec?
     
  5. futurecadet

    futurecadet Member

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    Thank you all for the timely and helpful replies!
     

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