Physical Preparation for BCT

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by 2016AFA, May 7, 2012.

  1. 2016AFA

    2016AFA New Member

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    Hey! I am going to BCT this summer with the class of 2016. Everyone says physical preparation is key and I believe them. But with such a crazy last two months I'm still nervous that I'm not doing enough. I am on the cross country and track and field teams and I am just about to finish with track. After the season ends I was going to try running up the mountain near my house for good 3-6 mile uphill workouts a couple days a week. I am hoping this will strengthen my lungs for the altitude (currently at about 500 ft above sea level). I am a girl so the thing I am most worried about it upper body strength... I can do 50 pushups in a row and 4 pullups... is this about average? I know the maximum is 8 pullups for girls, but that seems a bit difficult to reach in less than two months. I know that nothing I do will fully prepare me for the rigors of BCT but I would like to come in at least being able to stick with the pack. What are you guys doing to prepare? any advice?
     
  2. LFry94

    LFry94 USAFA C1C '17

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    Quoted from the 2011-2012 USAFA Catalog:

    How can I feel assured that I am physically prepared for bct?

    The cadet appointee kit includes specific instructions on physical preparation by the director of athletics. You should follow the instructions by establishing a daily aerobic workout of 30 minutes, without overtaxing or straining yourself. The Cadet FourthClass Council has also prepared the following advice: “Looking back on how we could have better prepared ourselves for entrance to the Academy, physical conditioning stands out first of all. The everyday strenuous conditioning activities can become discouraging and tiring if you’re not in shape. If you can accomplish the 30 minute daily workout, which includes running at least two miles and performing the other aerobic activities, you should be prepared for the physical demands that will be placed upon you. However, if you have not met all of the recommended standards before arrival, you will have the opportunity to increase your physical abilities in order to keep pace with your classmates.” Blisters and tendonitis are problems experienced frequently by basic cadets. It is very important that your shoes and combat boots are properly fitted to provide comfort.

    I'm training for BMT for USAFAPS, and I try to decrease the time between taking breaths to simulate the lower oxygen intake I will experience in Colorado. You could try something like that. As for upper body strength, just keep working on those pushups and pullups. :smile:
     
  3. Augustus

    Augustus Member

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    I really don't think you have much to work on. Rather, just keep working. If you can do 4 pullups now there is no reason you can't get that to six by June 28. The pushups are good but just keep at them. Make sure you swim a couple of days a week as well, that will also benefit you.

    Other than that, make sure you enjoy your last FREE summer! Good luck!
     
  4. ColinBlueMoon

    ColinBlueMoon Member

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    I would suggest you practice flutter kicks because it's incredibly likely you will be doing a ton of them.
     
  5. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    Flutter kicks, push-ups, and body-builders are really good to do.
    Running or swimming will help with your overall cardio fitness, which will make everything easier.
     
  6. dohdean

    dohdean Member

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    My daughter, currently C2C, will be one of the fitness cadre for BCT -- she will be out there helping to lead the 5 a.m. workouts (or whatever time it is they do the morning work outs under the lights). Her recommendation, like Raimius, is to work on flutter kicks (you will do hundreds), push ups, sits up and running for endurance (rather than speed). You will be given a couple of light days at the start to acclimate to altitude then training will begin in earnest to get everyone acclimated before Jacks Valley. She recommends that females arrive able to do at least one legitimate pull up -- being able to do that one (or more) real pull up will boost your confidence immensely and reduce the negative attention from cadre. My daughter (5'4" and 115 pounds)-- was not a big jock in high school -- she worked out with a trainer for the two months before Basic on lifting, upper body strength, core exercises and endurance. The trainer is not a necessity for everyone but for her the trainer was a big help because she hadn't done a lot of upper body/core works out previously. Go to Basic in decent condition and the willingness to work out hard. Your conditioning will improve -- attitude is a big key.
     
  7. Falcon15

    Falcon15 Parent

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    Flutter kicks with boots on!
     
  8. jwalsh1

    jwalsh1 Member

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    @Falcon15: I made the mistake of bringing my steel toe boots to the prep school basic. =P Flutter Kicks sucked xD
     
  9. fencersmother

    fencersmother Founding Member

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    If you can, do MORE than the books recommend, especially if you live at or near sea level. The high altitude does take its toll, and the affect can last for weeks, not just a few days.

    EX: my son, who aced the PFT with a 500 (most possible points) was briefly hospitalized after A-Day (!) with high-altitude symptoms (and moms/dads - they don't tell you till it's all over!).

    So, if they say run 10 miles a week, run 15 or more if you can! And flutters with boots on is a really good idea.
     
  10. Derrick

    Derrick USAFA Class of 2015

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    Run, run, and run some more. I was a runner in high school and think having a high aerobic capacity helped a lot. It helps you deal with what they throw at you and helps you recover faster. Otherwise, you'll be doing plenty of push ups and flutter kicks. Those are the main things to focus on. I won't give away any secrets =)

    Now that I'm here and there's fitness beyond running, I've found crossfit to be a great workout. Try tabata push ups which is 20 seconds of pushups, ten seconds of rest, for eight sets (should take 4 minutes). You can do more or less depending on your fitness. You can apply this to pullups, flutterkicks, etc. It's a good, albeit very basic workout.

    Otherwise just stay focused on the end. Days are slow but the weeks move fast!
     
  11. PearlSword

    PearlSword New Member

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    Any plans to come up here a few days before I-day would be a good idea. I was a cross country/track long distance runner too and still felt the affects of the higher altitude.

    I came up a week before I-day and did quite a bit of running, and one thing I noticed is that I would get cotton-mouthed a lot easier and couldn't run as long.

    It sounds like you are really doing well on everything else! Good luck!
     

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