Physically Unqualified

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Physicallyunqualified, Aug 4, 2016.

  1. Physicallyunqualified

    Physicallyunqualified New Member

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    The username says it all. I'm a freshman starting NROTC this fall. I've got a scholarship, but the way things are looking currently, I won't be getting the money, because I will probably fail the PFT. I know what needs to be done to get back in good shape, but it won't come together in time before I get tested at orientation. My question is - what are my options and what's the process? From what I understand, I won't actually lose my scholarship, it just won't be activated. Is that the case? If I pass the test before the second semester while sticking with the unit, will the scholarship be activated retroactively - will I receive the money for the first semester too? Sorry if that's a dumb question.

    Working on fitness too, and hoping to scrape the minimums (and obviously improve over the year for the real PFTs that are counted), but I just wanted to know, because I would have to take out some loans otherwise.

    Also, just for my own embarrassment and shame, I wanted to ask if anyone on here has ever heard of this happening to another mid. I've got dreams of serving as an officer, and I'm unhappy about putting myself in this position. Just wanted to know if there's any anecdotes out there of a member of a unit getting through this and graduating four years later honorably.
     
  2. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    First off, I understand you are an incoming freshman so I will give you some slack but... get off the computer and go work out. Work out from now until you report to school and stop thinking you need a whole semester to get in shape to pass a PFT.

    Your scholarship will not be started until you pass the PFT. You will not get money retroactively.

    If you fail the initial assessment, the unit will assign you extra training in the morning to get you where you need to be. It will be supervised and you will be pushed past your "comfort" zone. The "official" PFT comes later in the semester.

    Has it happened before? Surely. Just fix it and move on.
     
  3. k2rider

    k2rider Member

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    Maybe in your era but this is a new era. My son was the "supervising" cadet for those extra-curricular morning PT sessions at his school last year and the limits placed on what he could put the subpar cadets through was laughable.
     
  4. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    Point taken. It is a different world. I should have said the OP will be strongly encouraged to consider working harder if they desire to someday become an Officer ... but it is up to them. ;)
     
  5. Sled

    Sled Member

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    My opinion is that it is all up to you. You're the only one who will be able to train yourself to the level it needs to be. I've found that the key to success in something like this is REALLY simple....just going out and doing it. How many miles/pushups/lifts have you done today? With enough work I have no doubt that you can get there in time. If you're running into the problem where you just don't know where to start PM me. I can try to help whether it be diet or workout plan.
     
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  6. Dckc88

    Dckc88 Member

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    I see you only have one post, so you won't be able to PM anyone yet, once you have 10 posts you can.

    How many weeks do you have?
    Can you run 1.5 miles without stopping at this point (doesn't matter the time, just can you do it?)
    How many push-ups can you do at this point, curl-ups?
    Are you male or female?
    Are there any other concerns?

    I agree with the above posts, just get moving, do the best you can and you might surprise yourself. You also want to work out regularly so you are not too sore once you get to campus. I know my DD has PT for several days before the test once she gets to campus, which can work against you if you are out of shape. I spent 10 years as a trainer, happy to help with what to do, just matters if it is 2 weeks, 3 weeks, etc.
     
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  7. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    5 posts to PM. Recent change.
     
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  8. PennStateArmyROTC

    PennStateArmyROTC Penn State ROO

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    I have to agree with USMC here. I mean, you're an 18-year old scholarship winner and the sky is already falling.

    Understand something: you won't be an officer for four years. You procrastinated and it's now too late to improve your fitness to pass the PFT? That's not good, but it's not what is going to hurt you. It is the defeatist attitude that will only result in failure, if you let it.

    1) You won't be the only one. 2) You won't be the worst one. 3) Improving fitness to an acceptable level takes less time than you think, but your timeline doesn't start until you get moving. 4) Life is a self-fulfilling prophecy. If you already believe you're going to fail (after earning a full ride at the age of 18), it isn't going to get much easier.

    Get up. Fix it. Don't let someone take YOUR scholarship from you.
     
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  9. nofodad

    nofodad Member

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    Very good advice. One more thought, don't think that once you pass the PFT, that the PT sessions with your unit will be enough to continue to improve your fitness. If you really want to improve and make an impression (after failing the initial test) you'll likely need to work out in addition to regular PT.
     
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  10. AJC

    AJC Member

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    Darwin was right.
    Another example of natural selection.
     
  11. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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    Not true. If you flat out fail the inventory PRT/PFT upon checking into the unit (not miss the commissioning standard, but FAIL), the guidance is that a PNS not activate the scholarship. If a student can improve their PRT/PFT score to above the minimum passing threshold before tuition is paid (typically 6 weeks after the start of the semester), the scholarship can then be activated. Doesn't happen often, but that's the guidance. NSTC/OD don't pay for failures.
     
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  12. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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    I'd recommend a different mindset on the "your" scholarship thing. It's not your scholarship, it belongs to the Navy/Marine Corps. They're just lending it to you. Fail to meet standards, and they'll give it to someone else instead. Where do you think side load scholarships come from?
     
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  13. 5Day

    5Day Member

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    You already know this, but the minimum standard for a male 17 to 19 is 50 sit ups, 42 push up and a 12:30 mile and half. You have a week or so before orientation. So get to work. Be prepared for some tough love during O week. Per @NavyNOLA you MAY have 6 weeks after the semester starts to get above minimum. Also, get those loans in line, you may need them to pay your first semester bill.
     
  14. PennStateArmyROTC

    PennStateArmyROTC Penn State ROO

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    NOLA makes an excellent point to remember, especially when addressing who ultimately controls your fate. That said, if you fail to take ownership over your own career/status/progression, you will fail.

    NOLA, I'do be interested to know NROTC's actual policy on this issue. In Army ROTC, Cadet's scholarships have control numbers that assign them to an individual. Until that person fails to meet the administrative/performance standards set forth in the contracting requirements WITHIN the established timeframe, the scholarship is theirs to lose. They'll snatch it away if they have the opportunity, but not until one of those criteria are met.

    Respectfully, I find it hard to believe that one failed physical fitness test would result in disenrollment/loss of scholarship - OR - that individual programs have much ability to deviate from the standard. It leaves too much room for subjectivity, and that leads to boards and congressionals and so on...

    But, if I'm wrong, Inshallah! Cheers
     
  15. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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    I wasn't talking about the accounting particulars, I was talking about the mindset.

    I didn't say loss of scholarship. I said the scholarship wouldn't be activated. If a freshman midshipman FAILS (different than not meeting commissioning standards of GOOD), the inventory PRT/PFT at the start of the semester, a unit and PNS do not have to activate the scholarship. Guidance from higher headquarters is that they do NOT activate. Incoming students are told this in the scholarship paperwork that is sent to them in the summer. If the scholarship is not activated, benefits don't get paid.
     
  16. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Thanks for the correction. I'll edit out that portion of my post.
     
  17. tommyboy44

    tommyboy44 Member

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    The biggest tip that I can give you about fitness, is push past your limit. If you do workouts that you have no trouble completing, it barely helps you. You need workouts that will make it so it is hard to stand up out of a chair or sit up in your bed afterwards if you want to improve in that little amount of time. I recommend running ALOT! Running is one of those exercises that does not specifically help one area and just improves your overall fitness by increasing your oxygen efficiency and increasing endurance in the whole body.
     
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  18. AnAstronautEventually

    AnAstronautEventually New Member

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    College programer here. I was in the same boat when I showed up freshman year. Was not athletic whatsoever prior to enrollment with NROTC. My initial PRT was nothing short of pathetic and there were 1 or 2 other MIDN that were awarded scholarship and did not pass that day.

    My advice is this. It will be a bit unnerving and maybe a bit discouraging being surrounded by fellow students who are going to pass with flying colors. Try not to let it get to you. When it comes time to PT, whether with the unit or on your own time, surround yourself with those students who are just a bit better than you are. It will help you to push yourself to give everything you have. When it comes to PT with the unit every week, you will get out what you put in. There will be students that can pass the PRT and have no drive to further develop themselves and will put in the same effort every morning and get the same results every PRT. You have to put in the effort yourself to improve. PT with the unit alone is not going to be enough, either. You will need to be working out on your own time as well. Be wary of your body, too, as you transition into a more athletic lifestyle. I was not careful and ended up with shin splints for a while.

    Be dedicated. Be committed. In the end there is no greater feeling than being able to recognize improvement in yourself. But once you see that improvement, you can't stop. Keep improving.

    Make no mistake that you are behind the curve, but what matters most is that from the day you show up you will be committed to making sure that you only improve.
     
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  19. nofodad

    nofodad Member

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    AROTC experience. DS was one of 5 MSI's none of whom had a scholarship. They all passed the first PFT easily, one failed. On the next PT that cadet passed and was also the first cadet awarded a campus based scholarship. She graduated at the top of her company's class. Get in shape. Improve your fitness. Scholar-athlete-leader. There are a variety of ways to make an impression on your cadre. Most of all believe in yourself.
     
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