PLC Law Program

Discussion in 'OTS/OCS/PLC' started by ratdad, Oct 28, 2009.

  1. ratdad

    ratdad New Member

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    I'm looking for some information and insight into the USMC PLC Law Program. My son is a Rat at VMI. His original goal was to go into the USN in the JAG program. However, he has been informed by the NROTC Commander at VMI that NROTC does not offer it's cadets an option to go straight into Law school and then serve in the Navy in JAG. However, the Marine ROTC Commander has told him that the Marines do offer such a program through their PLC Law offering. Can anyone shed any light on this program? How does it work? Does the USMC prick up the tab for Law school? Do they limit the law schools that he must attend? What commitment does he need to make to the USMC in return for acceptance into this program?
     
  2. TWinter

    TWinter Member

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    1) The Program

    USMC Platoon Leader’s Class (PLC) is a program designed for college undergraduates. It consists of either two six-week sessions, or one ten-week session. You can contract three ways: PLC-Law, PLC-Air, PLC-Ground. For example, I am currently enrolled in the PLC-Ground pipeline. That means I will be assigned to one of the many officer MOSs outside of JAG and aviation. PLC-Law is what your son would be pursuing.


    2) How Does It Work

    To be eligible for PLC (Law) an applicant must be a senior in college who is accepted to a law school, or a 1L or 2L attending a ABA accredited law school. A participant in the program attends a ten week course during one summer at Officer Candidate School, Quantico, Virginia. After completing OCS they will receive a commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps and go onto inactive duty.

    Following this training, the newly commissioned officer returns to law school to complete his legal education. During this period, he is promoted with his peers. During summer months, the individual may apply for active duty and be assigned to a Marine Corps base or unit and assume legal duties. Those selected for duty receive the pay and allowances of their rank, travel allowances, and per-diem based on the geographic area to which they are assigned. After law school graduation, the individual-must take the first scheduled bar exam. If they do not successfully pass the first exam, they will be permitted to take the next scheduled exam. If the second exam is not passed, the individual will be ordered to active duty for a period specified in the service agreement.

    When the individual passes either exam and is sworn in before the bar of a federal court or the highest court of a state or district, they will be ordered to The Basic School at Quantico, Virginia, and subsequently to the Naval Justice School in Newport, Rhode Island. Following this training he will serve as a judge advocate in the Marine Corps.

    Any participant in the PLC (LAW) program who was commissioned after starting law school may, while at The Basic School, apply for and receive promotion credit for rank determination and seniority. Consequently, all PLC (LAW) lawyers will leave the Basic School as First Lieutenants with approximately a year's seniority. Time in service for retirement purposes (longevity) is computed from the date the reported to Officer Candidates School. Because of this, it is to an applicant's benefit to enter the PLC (LAW) program as early in his law school career as possible.


    3) Do the Marines pay for Law School

    The tuition assistance is MCTAP. It is only $5,200 a year. MCO 1560.33 indicates that by accepting MCTAP your son must serve 5 of your 8 year obligation on active duty, regardless of how much your son accepts. You can also take a look at MCO P1100.73B. In fact, you should talk to an OSO, because they are the experts.


    4) Do they specify what schools

    He can go to any accredited Law school that y'all can afford. I say afford because commissioning as an officer requires Top Secret clearance, and I’m sure for certain jobs and maybe even trials a higher clearance could be required. Large amounts of debt are often a red flag (or so I have heard.)


    5) What commitment is required

    As far as I know, all officer commissions are for 8 years. This is something most people not familiar with the process miss. THEY ARE FOR EIGHT YEARS. The different programs put different requirements on how much of those eight years must be Active Duty. For example: graduating PLC/OCC you are required to serve four active duty, four inactive reserve. Graduating the Academy would require you to serve five active duty, three inactive reserve. Each program is different. As noted before, accepting money increases your active duty requirement.



    Please see this website: www.marineocs.com
    The area specifically for PLC/OCC-Law hopefuls: http://www.marineocs.com/portal/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewforum&f=61


    DISCLAIMER: I am not an expert. I am not 100% accurate at all times. I have researched and am in the PLC program. I am trying to give the best picture I can, but I am not as OSO. I highly recommend your son talks to an OSO.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
  3. ratdad

    ratdad New Member

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    Thanks for the response. One question...what or who is an OSO?
     
  4. TWinter

    TWinter Member

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    Oh my mistake.

    An OSO is an acronym for Officer Selection Officer. They are the officers in charge of recruiting officer candidates around the country. Here is a list of Marine OSO offices: http://openbah.com/marine-ocs-articles/marine-oso-city-list

    I'm sure if NROTC(MO) or even NROTC is offered at your son's school then the people in charge would be familiar with whatever nearby OSO has jurisdiction.
     
  5. TWinter

    TWinter Member

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    "To be eligible for PLC (Law) an applicant must be a senior in college who is accepted to a law school, or a 1L or 2L attending a ABA accredited law school"

    tpg is 100% correct
     

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