Possiblity of 2 Waivers?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by bowhunter, Nov 6, 2012.

  1. bowhunter

    bowhunter Member

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    My son received an LOA in Oct. DodMerb via the phone yesterday said it looks like he will need a couple of waivers:

    1. Back injury from sports his 9th grade year. Wore a brace for awhile and has since competed in 3 years of varsity football and wrestling and has never has an issue. Back Squats over 400 pounds! Required no surgery and wears no brace which was conveyed to DodMerb in a letter.

    2. Vocal Cord dysfunction. In his med history a speech patholigist wrote this as a possibility for his deep croup cough he had after a two day-10 match wrestling tournament he wrestled while sick. He has never had any problems since and we have never even thought of it until now but it showed in his file.

    Should these be waived?? This kid is as healthy as they come but I am new to this process. Does he have a chance???
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Everybody has a chance! More seriously, although I'm not a doctor nor do I sit on whatever board issues waivers, from what you describe I would think he has an excellent chance. Go for it and good luck! :thumb:
     
  3. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    It is possible to obtain two medical waivers. Whether your son will is a question only USNA can answer.
     
  4. Kram1

    Kram1 Member

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    Not to be discouraging here, as every case is different and every situation is different. Yes, apply...you know with 100% certainty that if you don't apply for the waiver/s you won't get them. better shot if you apply, right?

    But, was recently told that medical waivers of all varieties will be getting harder as "cut backs" in the service ranks are upon us. They will be looking to take only the "most" qualified...and that includes medically....from the many who are qualified. Class sizes at all of our Service Academies might just be smaller in coming years. At least that is what I was recently told by a person "in the know".

    So, bottom line here...be prepared. Get all the info you can on these conditions, get your medical professionals to understand before they supply info on the matter just how very important what they say will be, etc., etc. AND DO NOT MISS ANY DEADLINES in the application and waiver process. Be prepared and be ready.
     
  5. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Entering class sizes are getting smaller but, for now, that's b/c attrition has decreased such that you need fewer entrants to produce the same number of graduates.

    I've not heard anything regarding whether medical waivers have decreased or will decrease.
     
  6. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    Regarding the 2nd issue, vocal cord, it seems there never was an actual issue, only an prediction that an issue might develop. Since it never developed , there was never an issue.

    Regarding the "Back Injury", you didn't specify what it was. if it was a soft tissue injury (i.e. strained muscle) that completely healed on its own, that is different from an orthopaedic issue.

    Having followed for a couple of years on this website Waivers that were and were not granted, I infer that judgement is involved. Prior injuries that completely healed (i.e. broker tibia) are very different from injuries that didn't completely heal (i.e. shoulder separation that still pops out sometimes), which are very different from mildly impairing permanent conditions (i.e mild allergies), which are different from permanent impairing conditions that are unacceptable (i.e. flat feet).

    When a sailor's body and mind are their primary tools/weapons, lives depend on them being in good permanent working order.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012

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