Post-USNA Aviation Career

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by tiger50, Aug 30, 2011.

  1. tiger50

    tiger50 Member

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    I was wondering if anyone had an explanation of the timeline from the USNA to an attempted aviator career. Starting from the Academy to the first assignment in an FRS, how does it work? How many USNA alumni get chosen to go to pilot training? What is the process of pilot training for naval aviators? At the end of training, how does the track selection process work? I appreciate all the help.
     
  2. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    You will report to P'cola and 15-24 months later, depending on the pipeline, weather, backlog, and a host of other factors, you will get your wings and move on to the appropriate FRS. With bases in both Mississippi and Texas, you will more than likely move at least once. After Preflight in Pensalcola, students move on to Primary flight training in either Whiting, FL or Corpus Christi, TX. They then select their advanced pipeline based on both grades and needs of the Navy and move on to advanced training.

    You asked both here and in the AFA forum about comparative numbers going into aviation. This doesn't matter at all. What matters is the odds of getting one of those openings. I would guess that at either Academy it is probably nearly the same. What you must look at, as everyone suggests, is which service you want to fly for and if, for some reason you do not get your first choice, which SA offers the best backup plan.
     
  3. 18 Delta

    18 Delta Member

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    If you get pilot, API at Pensacola Primary at Corpus or Whiting or Enid
    Chose your platform based on performance
    Helos- Whiting
    Tailhook - Meridian or Kingsville then Corpus if E-2 or C-2
    P3 Corpus.
     
  4. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    The last several years about 300 grads got aviation (pilot) slots. It is a bit confused because that includes both Navy and Marine selectees.
     
  5. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    BTW, I recommend you not attempt a straightline comparison with AFA, since sizeable numbers of USNA grads SELECT subs, SWO, Marines, etc, whereas AFA is more focused on aviation. Also, you might want to take a look at what is included in the flight programs.
     
  6. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    Yes, there are about 300 who get selected for pilot training out of the academy each year (Navy + Marine Corps). It's fairly competitive to get those slots since it is one of the more popular service selections.

    You have to have 20/20 vision without wearing glasses or contacts. The academy will "fix" your vision if they feel you want to go "Air" and are competitive. (In my day, the moment you lost your uncorrected 20/20 vision, your future as a pilot was gone.)

    WARNING: Once in flight school, it used to be you either passed or washed out. Most people pass. How well you do while in flight school plays a big role in which fleet aircraft you are assigned. Nowadays, they are establishing a "cutoff". I've heard that it is currently 92%. If a SNA (Student Naval Aviator) has not reached the "cutoff" with his flight grades by a certain point in training, they separate him from the military. I don't mean that he has to leave the aviation community for another community. The student is given an "honorable discharge" and leaves the service. Whatever obligation remains from whatever commissioning program they came from is waived. No payback is required. This has happened to academy graduates. Their perspective on this varies. I talked to one parent who thought her son got a "good deal".

    This is also happening in Nuclear Power School.

    The fact of the matter is the Navy (the entire military, in fact) is currently in a RIF (Reduction In Force) mode. They are cutting costs across the board which requires less personnel. Also, retention is very high. The economy and job market are so bleak that many military personnel are opting to stay in instead of getting out.

    This is why I predict the Class of 2016 will be smaller than usual. Most of the recent classes have been slightly over 1200. I predict the Class of 2016 will be under-1200; if, for no other reason, the size of the Brigade is a bit bloated because of unprecedented low attrition.

    Currently, the airlines are not doing much hiring. There are not many job opportunities for the pilots so they are staying in the military.

    The pendulum tends to swing back-and-forth, however. This is not the first or the last time this has happened. Don't be surprised if, in a few years, the Navy will be scrambling to get pilots because of a shortage.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2011

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