Potential recipe for a DQ?

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by s_agathon, May 17, 2012.

  1. s_agathon

    s_agathon New Member

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    Hi everyone, I am a HS junior (female) currently applying for an NROTC scholarship. Once I get my commission, I would like to go into aviation as either a pilot or an NFO, or barring that I would be fine with surface warfare or subs. I am 5'3", still growing, weight around 105 lbs. The one problem I can forsee with my application is that around the age of 6, I was diagnosed with mild asthma. I have not had an attack since I was 2. I've never used steroids like prednisone. I have been prescribed a maintenance medication (Flovent) in the lowest dose possible, but I never take it, and that fact is actually on my medical record. Additionally, my doctor has indicated that whatever it was I had, I have grown out of it. My spirometry levels are totally normal and not indicative of asthma whatsoever. Regardless, will my history DQ me for NROTC? It's worth mentioning that both a NROTC recruiter I spoke to at a college fair and my college counselor have told me to flat out lie and deny any history of asthma since such a minor version isn't worth losing my dream over. Thank you for your advice!
     
  2. mom3boys

    mom3boys Parent

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    Over the years on this forum we've seen cases like yours often. What I remember seeing is a preliminary DQ, but remedials offered (add'l tests) and then waiver granted. You need to be honest. If you tell the truth all the time you don't have to remember what you said.
     
  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Also since you want rated you will go through a very in depth exam prior to commissioning like mom3boys stated in 4 yrs from now you won't have to worry about being DQ'd weeks before commissioning.

    One thing to understand in the rated world, standing height is one thing, but sitting height is even a bigger issue. Our 6'4 DS has a shorter sitting height than his 5'10 brother. If you are all legs with a short sitting height, it can be a problem for safety reasons.
     
  4. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    If your doctor said you have grown out of it, then why are you being prescribed a "Maintenance" medication? Or is this something you were prescribed when you were 7 years old? If it's something you were prescribed recently, then obviously, your doctor believes you have a form of asthma; and you need to answer the health questions accordingly. If it's something you were prescribed when you were like 7 years old and haven't been prescribed it since, then I wouldn't have a problem if the question was answered a little differently.

    One thing that I have learned in the last 13 years of helping kids go to college, tech school, enlist, and the academy/ROTC, is we don't seem to always know 100% of what's going on. We tend to be told a censored version of the facts.

    I totally admit that I would recommend a different response to an individual in filling out their medical history if the incident was isolated and happened 13 years ago; compared to something that was repetitive and/or happened somewhat recently. Plus; you have to read the questions carefully. For instance; I've had people want to know how to answer: "Have you illegally used drugs or alcohol". They say that they have drank alcohol in the past. Well; the drinking age is NOT a federal law. It is a state law. In many states, it is totally LEGAL for someone under 21 to drink alcohol if at home, condoned, and supervised by their parents. So, if those were the conditions you were drinking, then it wasn't "ILLEGAL"; which is what the question asks.

    Point is: Only you know the right answer to your question. I know that we don't have all the information and don't know all the facts. But you do. When you get the form and are asked the question, determine what the question is asking and the intent, and answer it honestly.
     
  5. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    I always recommend that people be as truthful as possible on all of their medical forms. It may cause some short time angst or pain, but in the long run it is much easier.

    I will give you an example from my time as a flight surgeon.

    A ROTC student came to see me for an initial flight physical. As usual their military health record was given to me which for a ROTC student really only contains their previous military physicals. On the flight physical the member marked all the "correct" answers (i.e. 'No' to all medical history); however, when I reviewed their other military physicals it was noted they had a history of something that would be disqualifying for flight; however, a waiver was possible. I asked the member again if they had XYZ and they again denied it. I gently reminded them about their previous marks on their physical (this was something you would not forget you had by the way) and told them they were disqualified from flight for a history of 'XYZ' and that due to their lack of honesty they would not be elgible for a waiver.

    Flight surgeons in the Navy are specifically trained to do flight physicals and look for things that could potentially cause problems in the "human-machine" interface. We are given notice that we should not allow those who try to "game the system" into the aviation community as if they are willing to lie to us what else are they willing to do when given the keys to a multi-million dollar aircraft.
     
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Off topic, but on topic.

    KP does NROTC do the same for rated as AFROTC?

    AFROTC flies all of the rated cadets to one base, Wright Pat, for a 3 Day physical exam.

    Is there a Navy hospital/installation that all of the rated mids go through. no offense, but like a medical clearing center?
     
  7. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    You are not going to lie. You are going to answer the questions truthfully.
    If you were EVER diagnosed with asthma/wheezing - then check 'yes'.

    On the form there is space to provide an explanation. You can write in there a more thorough explanation of your history.

    I agree with CC that there is a disconnect here in not having asthma since age 2 and still being prescribed an inhaler.
    I highly suggest you order a copy of all your medical records from birth to present - you are probably going to need to submit them anyway - read through them with a parent and see what your physician(s) wrote.
    This will help you complete your history accurately.
    You can also write a letter saying you haven't used the inhaler and enclosed any spriometry test results.

    The DQ is for Asthma diagnosed after Age 13. If Dodmerb is satisfied this is true in your case; you won't be DQ'd. If you are DQ'd - all this supporting material will be used if a waiver is sought by the academy.
     
  8. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    No, the ROTC cadets will usually go to the closest naval air station that has a flight surgeon. I was stationed in the PacNW and would do flight physicals for ROTC students as far away as Montana/Idaho/Oregon.

    Once we complete the physical it is then submitted through NAMI in Pensacola, FL who actually gives the yea/nay which is then forwarded to NAVPERS or Commandant of the Marine Corps who gives the official yea/nay.
     

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