Preparing for BCT

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by afajms2014, Apr 4, 2010.

  1. afajms2014

    afajms2014 Member

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    What can be done to prepare mentally and physically for BCT, besides exercise obviously. I realize there is no way to totally prepare for it but every little bit helps.
     
  2. ZoomingFalcon

    ZoomingFalcon Cadet

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    I looked at their suggested weight workout that came in the BFE; it's not that great. I would suggest a pyramid-like workout. For something like push-ups, do one, then two, then three, then four, etc. to ten, then back down to one. For pull-ups, if you can do a pyramid from one to ten and back down, that's awesome. If not, try one to five, then back down. Core strength will probably be the hardest (just a guess), but I'm sure the upperclassmen have favorites (flutter kicks).

    Pretty much do whatever exercises that you can do anywhere, since we won't have any fancy equipment or anything.

    The running workout looks solid. Starting in May, I'll be doing a modified X-Country workout at 5 AM, then a strength workout after school. The harder you make it at home, the slightly easier it's going to be there.:rolleyes:
     
  3. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Physically? That's easy. You're from Michigan, Colorado Springs is over 7,000 feet up. RUN a lot. Swimming is also good.

    Mentally? Realize that the academy is a means of reaching your goals. Keep your goals in mind and remember WHY you're there. Realize that in your school; your grades, classes, ranking, etc... put you as one of the true "upper" class. Your accomplishments made you stand out. At the academy, all 1300 of your classmates were exactly in the same category and class as you. In other words, realize that you are now a small fish in a large pond instead of a large fish in a small pond. The ego, pride, etc... needs to be put away. Realize that one of the purposes of BCT is to take 1300 trainees from 50 states, territories, and overseas locations and BREAK them down to not necessarily take away their individuality, but to develop and force upon them a "Common Denominator". This is what will be used to teach, promote, and emphasize the importance of "TEAM WORK".

    Also, remember that MORE than 50,000 cadets have gone through this before you. That there is NOTHING that you are going to experience, feel, have emotions about, etc... that others haven't had before you. As well as every other cadet along side of you. If you do a little search; or ask Brian (BSA), he has made a pretty good collection of posts from this forum; he can point you to a post of all the emotions you will go through, and how to deal with them.

    Point is, if you are ready for the emotions and mental stress, you can easily adapt and deal with it. It's when you convince yourself that the academy will be something that it doesn't turn out to be, where it becomes too difficult to handle for some people. Best of luck. Mike....
     
  4. bsa07eagle

    bsa07eagle Member

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    Originally posted by Christcorp:

     
  5. hawkeye

    hawkeye Banned

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    Mentally- I would say whenever you feel like quitting or are doubting yourself, remember why you are there in the first place, to serve our great country, the United States of America. BCT is 2-3 weeks long ,with the 2nd part (the physical part) being most difficult. When we are in Jacks Valley this summer, just remember that BCT is only a small stepping stone to something far greater. You are going to get a lot of criticism, just remember the cadre are doing their job, its not personal.

    Physically- From what I've heard, pushups and flutterkicks are the cadres most favorite exercises to do. Ive also heard we are going to be pushed to our limit and tired all of the time!!
    --Easiest way to do more pushups with quality is to actually do pushups. Do wide grip, military, close grip(diamond pushups), elevated pushups(your feet are higher than your shoulders). Chest and core are the primary muscles in pushups, with triceps and shoulders working too.
    --Flutterkicks--This is the exercise the cadre(from what i've heard again) will have us do the most of. Flutterkicks are mainly core(abs) and thighs(hamstrings). If you can find a 'good' core workout, your flutterkick and pushup endurance will increase. Core is also used in pullups, crunches(which they will have us do also, but not as much as the other two), and core is actually essential in distance running.
    So basically,
     
  6. CranoOrden

    CranoOrden Member

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    I'm biased for running because that's what I like to do in my free time. But, yeah, if you can get to the point where you're running 3-5 miles every day....the running part of basic will be a breze compared to some other things.

    I did an 11 mile run the day before I left for I-day and I still got killed by altitude when I showed up. So, all you can do is keep working at it.
     
  7. afajms2014

    afajms2014 Member

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    yeah i live in alabama so the whole elevation thing is gonna be a new experience but what do you mean by flutterkick?? like feet at 6" and pulse kick up and down like swimming?
     
  8. eagle36

    eagle36 USAFA Alumnus

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    accept that you're a piece of **** and not worth anything



    (this is the mindset i went into basic with, and i found it quite easy. harsh, yes, but it works)
     
  9. CranoOrden

    CranoOrden Member

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    Eagle let me know that I should use this mindset in basic too. He just did it very loudly. Haha, everything you do is wrong.
     
  10. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    eagle, if it worked for you, then that's good. But I think that would be a difficult mindset or attitude for me to digest. An appointee has been accepted to one of the top-10 universities in the country. They graduated high school in some of the highest percentage. (Many of the appointees are ranked in the top-10 of their class). You kicked butt on SAT/ACT and other academic areas. You could probably get accepted to almost any university in the country. To think of yourself as a piece of shiite and that you are insignificant, would go totally against my grain; PLUS, because of all my accomplishments, I WOULDN'T BELIEVE IT anyway. But if that worked for you, then maybe that will work for someone else.

    Me personally, I prefer to understand the why's and the motivation. I've eluded to it in some of my posts, but let me explain briefly. (Me brief? yea, right). During BCT, the purpose is 3-fold. (This isn't OFFICIAL, just reality)

    1. Take 1300+ different personalities, likes, dislikes, attitudes, backgrounds, experiences, etc... and break them ALL down until they can find a "COMMON DENOMINATOR". Use that "COMMON DENOMINATOR" to develop and instill teamwork and common goals.

    2. Push you mentally and physically beyond what you're use to, to develop confidence in oneself. Most people think they are confident. Especially teenagers. Sorry, but that's a delusion. Confidence is purely a state of mind. It's what drives you. It's what gives you determination to succeed. While many teens think they have this, what they don't realize is that deep down inside, they always knew that mom and/or dad was always there for them. They might not think they "Needed" them, and they probably didn't need them, but in their psyche, that is what gave them confidence. Because they knew that no matter what, there was someone there for them if something went wrong. Well, in BCT, it's time to make you rely on yourself. There is no more mom/dad. There's only what you can do for yourself. You have to be responsible. Then, your talents can contribute to the teamwork mentioned in #1.

    3. The final purpose of BCT is to teach you to think outside of yourself. It's not all about you. There's a much larger purpose and something larger then yourself at the end of this rainbow. It's your flight, your squadron, the United State Air Force, your family, neighbors, our country, the constitution, and the life you are willing to give for those things. You will learn that you are part of the whole instead of an individual. Different than teamwork. This is about mission. How if everyone doesn't do their part, success is jeopardized. That's why they will present you with tasks that are literally IMPOSSIBLE for you to complete without everyone chipping in and doing their part. This is how you develop trust. Trust in yourself and others. Especially when circumstances make is so you can't always know WHY things are the way they are. You have to trust those appointed over you.

    It's combining these 3 things that makes you a cadet and a member of the United State Armed Forces. I'm not telling you these things as some secret that gives you an edge at the academy. It won't. Not at all. But what it will do is help you understand WHY you are being treated like you are. Yes, maybe you are treated like shiite sometimes. But knowing WHY you are treated that way is much more important than just accepting it. You don't have to like it. You don't have to agree with the method. But if you understand why, then you can accept your responsibility and realize that it's got a purpose, and not just some 6 weeks of initiation and 8 months of "hazing".

    This thread is about preparing for BCT. If you've ever been involved with a team sport at the varsity level, then you know that in the beginning of the season, it's not uncommon to break you all down, and then build you back up. That's what this is about. Not having 1300 individuals progressing and growing at their own pace. It's about doing it as a team; as a group; As the Class of 2014. If you understand these things, then when the bad days are upon you, (Yes, there will be plenty of crappy days), you'll be able to deal with them because you'll understand that there is a method to the madness. Best of luck. Mike.....
     
  11. CadCandMateus

    CadCandMateus Recent Grad

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    i totally agree with eagle heh, that mindset will help out alot and won't come as a shock.
     
  12. HNeedle

    HNeedle Member

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    haha.. just dont be weaksauce.

    try your hardest, listen to what we tell you, and remember that you're in the military and we expect you to do your absolute best.

    have any other beast cadre realized the gravity of working basic? i dunno, but i feel like i've learned too much over the past 2 years at usafa and cant teach someone how to be a good cadet in just 5 and a half weeks... any thoughts/opinions?
     
  13. eagle36

    eagle36 USAFA Alumnus

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    Crano, that i did ;) but honestly, you all were... haha. j/k

    and CC, i know it won't work for everyone, and at times i definetely didn't believe it. but it's a great mindset (IMO) to try to work toward as opposed to "I'm better than everyone else here and it's all about me". that's the point i was trying to make.


    HNeedle (i almost typed your name... oops. lol)
    Beast isn't meant to make you perfet cadets. if so, we wouldn't need the entire 4th class year. it's supposed to be a time to break everyone down to an equal level and get them to start understanding that they're now involved with something "bigger than themselves". 4 digs have coaches and mentors all year to help them learn to be great cadets and to learn how to become leaders, normally through witnessing other people who do things well and just as equally poorly. I guarantee Crano and other people saw things this summer with me that they thought "i'll never do it that way", and hopefully some things they did like. but that's more for the freshmen year as opposed to basic
     
  14. Texas2013

    Texas2013 Member

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    Eagle, I had to laugh at your comment and those who replied to you...Our son went into BCT with the mindset that this was the beginning of something far bigger than himself and he was honored to do his part - however large or small at whatever stage in his career. He knew he had to put aside personal biases, opinions, attitude, etc. and allow the process to work (because it does). It was hard at times but he didn't fool himself. He knew it would be hard. Now, BCT is over, recognition is a thing of the past, the fourth class year is almost over...It's hard work, emotionally draining, very challenging on all levels but SO incredibly rewarding, too. He would tell you to get your priorities straight and don't go to the Academy with an agenda, "extra baggage (you can define this for yourself), or fear. Instead, show up with an open mind, healthy pride for what you have achieved so far and a solid understanding of the commitment you have made. In addition to these things, prepare yourself physically. It's not just the endurance issues that plague basics; it's the change in altitude, sleep/eating patterns, types of foods, creature comforts, shoes, etc. So many things are different.
    Good luck! Many people are cheering for you!!!
     
  15. Lifeisgood

    Lifeisgood Member

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    We were out in Co Springs a couple of weeks ago for a soccer game. AFA was playing the Colorado Rapids. Afterwards we took our son to Champs over on Briarcrest. Our son ordered Chicken Parmesan. As he was eating he said that he remembers eating the same dish the night before I-day with the soccer team and how scared he was about what was to come. He said that he only ate a little if anything that night. On the most recent occassion as he was eating the entire dish he said that if he would have known then what he knows now about BCT and the whole first year, he would have eaten the entire meal. Go into it with an open mind enjoy the best you can.
     
  16. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    HNeedle, BCT cannot "make" a good cadet. It sets the foundation.
    Just make sure every action you take is consistent with setting a solid foundation (basic skills, priorities, and attitudes).

    If you don't know how your actions will improve the basics, you need to step back and think.
     
  17. CadCandMateus

    CadCandMateus Recent Grad

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    any tips for me for this summer at lackland? ;x
     
  18. shortbread945

    shortbread945 Member

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    Bring shorts for days off. It gets hot down here in the summer. :smile:
     
  19. Texasrocks

    Texasrocks Member

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    it gets hot and somewhat humid. Hit seaworld on day off to cool down. Corpus and the beaches are about 1 to 1 1/2 hrs away. try some bay fishing if you get down there. Riverwalk is touristy but a good place to hang out at lots of service folks there.
     
  20. shortbread945

    shortbread945 Member

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    Fiesta Texas is pretty cool too. And the zoo can be fun. There's usually a lot of AF people walking around in their uniforms on weekends.
     

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