Prior-E about to start AFROTC

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by UsernameTaken, Jun 3, 2013.

  1. UsernameTaken

    UsernameTaken New Member

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    I'm about to start my journey to "the dark side", and was hoping for some tips and suggestions. I'll be starting AFROTC in the Fall as an AS200. Anything you guys got that you think may help with my transition would be much appreciated.
    Like uniforms, should I/am I allowed to wear items that will make me stick out: non-issue boots, fleece, chloroframes etc.
    Also how should I act in class. Would people care for real-life examples, or would it be better if I kept it all to myself?
    Also, I will be a crosstown cadet at a det where 70% of the cadet core is from the host school, will this make getting a FT slot harder?
    AAS, is it worth it?

    Sorry for all the questions, just want to make sure I hit the floor running. I know most dets have one or two Prior-Es, so I'd like to hear about what they did right/wrong.
     
  2. Adelita

    Adelita Member

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    I'm not prior Enlisted but I can speak on joining as a 200/250. No to chloroframs that's something only POC can wear as far as I know. You'll have to ask about boots and other stuff but you can't wear non-issued items at Field Training so why not break your boots in during the academic year? My APAS gave real life examples in class and always asked the prior-E guys for their takes on issues or if they had similar experiences. I'd say feel out your APAS, they'll probably ask who's prior enlisted on day one. My detachment had all FTP picked up this year, including crosstowns so I wouldn't worry about it if your stats are good and the cadre are saying you have a good shot. Yes AAS is worth it, you'll get to know people (in your class and others) and possibly cadre. Being involved in the det. is always a plus.

    The only advice I can think to give to you is to be flexible. You'll probably be required to do things in ROTC that you never did/do (like sometimes we salute in PTUs). Just be open to learning new things or doing things you're familiar with differently. My det. actually has a handful of prior-Es and at least 3 commissioned this spring. So seriously don't worry about it. Just learn your stuff and perform well and you should be fine.
     
  3. JMS

    JMS Member

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    I do not have answers for you, but it seems like a perfect reason to call the detachment and arrange to visit the school during the summer break, shake some hands and talk to some people. My DS is not prior, but we did visit (with an appointment) recently and were received warmly.
    I suspect some of your answers may be different from unit to unit. Thus answers here may not be accurate for you.
     
  4. UsernameTaken

    UsernameTaken New Member

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    @Adelita. Thanks for the reply.

    A lot of the answers I was looking for was mistakes Prior-E's make when they join AFROTC, which is probably better answered from the perspective of Prior-E's or other cadets rather than that from the cadre.

    I understand that certain things will vary from det to det, but I assume the overall culture and way people act in AFROTC is pretty similar across all Dets.
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    It depends on what you define as culture.

    I would assume an SMC culture is different than a traditional college. I would assume a large det would be different than a small det. I would assume a xtown cadet may view it differently than a host cadet.

    I think that is why JMS is saying visit.

    I would assume that they will expect a higher level from you compared to a traditional 200. Visiting the det. helps you regarding expectations the minute you hit the ground.

    To me being a prior-E can be frustrating. I am guessing you are at least 22; older than the avg 400. Yet, you will be a GMC. It places you in a unique position. Your peers (GMC) will be 19, and immature compared to you. Your POCs are your age group, but will be the leaders you report to.

    Visiting, calling the det. talking to them will also help you connect with prior Es in your det.

    This site is great for broad base questions, but you are going to a det., JMS is right IMPO, contact the det. You need to have more concise answers than what we can give here.

    Good luck.
     
  6. UsernameTaken

    UsernameTaken New Member

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    I guess I didn't word my questions clear enough. Other than the FT slot as a crosstown cadet question, I was looking more for answers about the social aspect, as in how I will be seen by the other cadets, and the best way to act around them. I feel like being a good cadet from the perspective of the Cadre is pretty straight forward.
    This was more so the answer I was looking for.

    I guess it's kind of silly of me to worry about. As an Airmen, you know how to act and where you stand on and off duty, and at the same time can see how the NCO's act. This helped me in my transition over to the NCO corp. I guess I was feeling a bit lost in the "rank" dynamics of AFROTC since I've never seen or talked to anyone about how it is. I guess I didn't want to fall into any common mistakes that can alienate me from the get go.

    Kind of like how before people leave for Basic they ask a bunch of questions and for tips. All are pretty generic, and everything depends on TRS and individual TIs but for some reason the personal anecdotes and tips seem to help with the anxiety (not anxiety as in I'm scared or anything, but the anxiety of being in-between or in a transitional phase if that makes any sense.) As stupid as it sounds, it is helpful, even for things like deployments and what not.


    It's probably the 1N4 in me, either way, I guess I'll find out in August.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2013
  7. agood93

    agood93 New Member

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    Hey,

    Just thought I would put in my two cents as a rising AS 200. From what I've seen from the priors, they are some of the sharpest, most together cadets we have. From my standpoint, if I need help on something, its the priors opinion I'm going to trust the most out of the GMC.

    I will say, however, that the priors don't usually make it known that they are prior. They simply show up and out perform everyone else. That is how you know them from the others. They know the PFA, they know how LLAB works, they know the customs. It wont be long until you have people asking about it in some way shape or form.

    Its one of those things where In the perspective of the detachment, you will certainly not be alienated in any way. You will be treated just as every other cadet would, with one major exception. The POC, or the airmen commissioning sooner rather than later will probably look up to you in some way shape or form.

    You've seen the active duty side, they haven't, and that experience is something they are going to want to learn about before they move on. Yes you will still be yelled at by them during FTP or whatnot, but in a general sense, the other cadets will be looking to you when they have questions or something they need done right.

    I can still remember one of the most eye opening moments in my AFROTC career this far was one prior E telling a bunch of us 100's what what he did while still in. It turns out he was on honor guard detail, and escorted the bodies of the fallen out of the Aircraft once they landed in the states. He didn't say much, but from what he did say, you could tell he had his stuff together and it brought the reality of what we were doing to the front of all our minds, in regards to our commitment. It's in that way that the priors are nice to have and hear from.

    Socially, Air Force wise there shouldn't be an issue with a prior fitting right in. In regards to schooling, that may be a bit different. I cant speak on that behalf, but finding a niche shouldn't be hard if you try to find one.
     
  8. JMS

    JMS Member

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    It still seems to me that the answers to these questions will vary from unit to unit, for the very reasons you state. I also think that if you pick up the phone today, you will get to talk to a Cadre member, tell them you are new to this ROTC thing and wanted to ask how things run there. You'll get some reassurance that the 'dark side' at college is not so bad. I'm thinking the cadre will be pleased you are reaching out to be sure that things will go smoothly. I expect you will be scheduled to meet with some priors and other current cadets for an informal chat when ever they are back from their summer stuff. Some may be around during the summer for school. Some of the newly minted 2nd Lts will probably be around running errands until their next school/assignment starts. There will be people to talk with informally about the social stuff and how priors fit in.
    Now, be anxious... it is a sure sign you give a hoot about what will happen... but don't let that keep you from dialing the phone today.
     
  9. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Not to go off topic, but traditionally newly minted O1s are not sent to AFROTC dets. while awaiting assignments. They usually go to ADAF bases on casual status. For example, our DS was sent to his UPT base for 6 mos of casual status, working on the flight line while awaiting his IFS/UPT class start date. However, he still had to wait 4 months from graduation before reporting for casual status.

    I just wanted to put that out there for clarification if cadets/candidates think they will go ADAF immediately after graduation, even if it is casual status, it is unlikely. AFA grads do. Thus, don't expect to find O1s hanging out at the det.

    Additionally, one thing to remember is this is PCS season. That means even if you do call, there is a chance that they will be talking to a brand new member. Plus, many dets are working with a skeleton crew because they are taking leave.

    Back on topic. I would suggest that the OP think about joining a military fraternity from a social perspective it may be the way to find your niche. These organizations have a x section of yr groups compared to going to GMC nights.

    I would also think as agood93 stated most cadets will immediately look to him for leadership/mentoring guidance.
     

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