Productive Summer?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by bosoxnation33, Mar 3, 2014.

  1. bosoxnation33

    bosoxnation33 Member

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    I'm currently a sophomore and I have some things in mind to keep me competitive over the summer such as CAP, taking an independent study course, working on my gold award, and I'd also like to get my first job at a day care. This is all while working on my regularly assigned summer work for my high school because my administrators are so wonderful :') What do the academies like to see in regards to how you spent your time over the summer?
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    That you spent it productively.
     
  3. TriService2017

    TriService2017 Member

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    summer activities

    I saw in one of the sticky notes what BGOs look for or ask in the interivews and one of the potential questions was "how did you spend your summer/s?" Basically, if you spend it playing video games, that would be not good. Another comment was if you volunteer, it is good to have some sort of leadership involved, not just pure volunteer hours. I thought is was all good advice and I plan to pass it along to my sophomore DD so she can have a more impressive "summer resume."
     
  4. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Here's the deal . . . most h.s. students have ~ 2-3 months off. How do you spend those 60-90 days?

    I want to see the rising h.s. senior doing something "productive." That could be attending camps, working, volunteering, coaching, etc.

    What isn't impressive is someone who tells me he/she spent the summer "working on college applications." All day, every day? I don't think so. That says to me the person basically did nothing -- this is particularly true when they don't have their USNA application complete until December!

    I realize some people cannot financially afford to attend summer camps or similar programs. You can volunteer. You can take a job. Don't have a car to drive to these activities? Offer to mow lawns or babysit in your neighborhood. Make things that can be sold. Pick up trash or otherwise beautify public property.

    There is a world of opportunity. Are you someone who looks to do something productive with your time and make the most of every minute or are you content to sit home "hanging out" for 3 months? If the latter, you're probably not going to succeed at USNA.
     
  5. skipsdad

    skipsdad Member

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    MOC - Internship

    To add to USNA1985's good advice, I suggest looking into internship programs with your MOC. Most Members of Congress have internship programs, which could be a great learning experience. These could be at the MOC's home office in their state, their district offices within the state, or in their D.C. office. You get exposed to the many activities related to 'constituent services', as well as the opportunity to dig in and make actual contributions.

    These are most likely volunteer positions. However, having a written recommendation from the MOC's district office manager as part of your nominations package from that MOC probably won't hurt.
     
  6. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Also, for USNA purposes, one does not necessarily need to "build" an "impressive resume." IOW, I don't think USNA is more impressed by someone who travels abroad to help the needy than someone who stays home and works at a fast-food restaurant.

    There are many, many opportunities wherever you live. Find something that interests you and, to the extent you can afford it financially, something that builds on your skills (e.g., sports, science) or furthers activities you already do (e.g., scouting, politics, acting, music). Or just do some good in your local community. I've seen candidates do everything from sports camps to working in Korea with veterans' groups, to an internship on an oceanographic research ship in the Med, to finishing their Eagle Scout project to working at a camp for special needs kids, to working for a landscaping company, and on and on.

    The above does NOT mean that you can't take some time off for vacation or just take a couple of weeks to "hang out." No one is looking for you to account for every moment of your summer. Rather, you should be able to talk/write about something you did to occupy your time.
     

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