Pulling the "insanity" card

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by matty, Feb 12, 2015.

  1. matty

    matty Member

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  2. MabryPsyD

    MabryPsyD Dr. G.

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    I question the PTSD diagnosis. If you've ever met or treated someone with a legit PTSD diagnosis; they wouldn't spend the afternoon hanging out at the gun range.
     
  3. servenow

    servenow Member

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    I initially thought the same thing. Also, if you know you have PTSD (often accompanied by hearing voices, hallucinations), the numbing effects of whiskey are understandable, but not that PCP laced marijuana. That is guaranteed to send you off that cliff. However, I was mentioning this to my ds, who is interested in all things related to medicine and PTSD and he said that he wasn't surprised at all. He said that his readings on the subject led him to believe that a common emotional response for those with PTSD is to actually miss the combat and lifestyle that accompanied combat and that engaging in activities that would fulfill the void in civilian life (such as frequenting a shooting range), can help the transition. I am still baffled by the drug choice though. Because it is so bizarre, until the perp has a vision of clarity, I conclude the whiskey clouded his judgment completely. So very sad.
     
  4. hawk

    hawk ButterBar Dad

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    If Rough suffered from PTSD it's not combat related based on information surfacing. His superiors and teammates are disputing most of his PTSD related "memories".

    Ex: as an armorer he apparently never left the ship in Haiti... So his traumatic "memories" apparently did not happen. Same for his Iraq stories.

    By all accounts he was showing severe schizophrenia symptoms, and possibly had been for a while.

    Likewise, indications are that recruiters should not have accepted his enlistment based on background info. Or at least would not not. Its not clear yet how that slipped through.

    There could be some family liability before it's over with, as they knew he was very unstable and did not share that info.
     
  5. MabryPsyD

    MabryPsyD Dr. G.

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    Not all PTSD is combat related. Prior to the war on terror, the majority of PTSD research came from rape victims. However I agree, his actions are not indicative of PTSD. During the surge, Recruiters waived all sorts of medical and psychological issues. I see the results in my office on a daily basis.

    @servenow audio and visual hallucinations are not symptoms of PTSD. Reexperiencing the activating event through daydreaming or nightmares are typical though.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2015
  6. grodr

    grodr Banned

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    Isn't one also able to get PTSD from observing a death, or seeing a dead body? I know that PTSD is usually associated with combat (not meaning strict definition, but in most of the public's minds). I've found that Jonathan Shay's book titled "Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma and the Undoing of Character" was an excellent primer for me on this subject. I especially liked the part about respecting the enemy dead. ~gr
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 16, 2015
  7. MabryPsyD

    MabryPsyD Dr. G.

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    "Observing death" is an interesting phrase/topic.

    One of the many criteria one has to meet to be diagnosed with PTSD is the threat (real or perceived) of serious harm or death.

    If a Soldier is on the battlefield and his buddy gets blown up right next to him; that would meet one criterion of PTSD.

    If a UAV pilot sitting in Nebraska sees a unit get wiped out by mortar in Afghanistan on his TV screen; I could not diagnose this guy with PTSD.

    Just seeing dead bodies and having an adverse psychological reaction could result in an adjustment disorder, but not PTSD.

    I blame Hollywood...
     
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  8. MedB

    MedB Parent

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    For whatever it is worth... A family member worked as a prison guard for a few years and it had a lasting and detrimental effect on their mental health. We understood the diagnosis to be PTSD (among other things) directly related to that environment. They did not see anyone blown up, but it was a violent and scary place.
     
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  9. MabryPsyD

    MabryPsyD Dr. G.

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    Makes sense. The daily (real) threat of serious harm or death. Hopefully they received help.
     
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