question for Army personel

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by djfrro, Sep 21, 2012.

  1. djfrro

    djfrro Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    My son is a 2012 WP graduate, he is finishing up his BOLC in Va and will be stationed at ft hood. We are in Ohio. He is under the impression that when traveling from Ohio to Texas he is only permitted to drive 350 miles a day, that would make the trip 4 days. My understanding is that the Army will pay him for 350 mi a day but that he is not limited to only driving that amount. I know that on pass soldiers are only permitted to drive a certian distance from base depending on the number of days off, ie 3 day pass = 350 miles, 4 day pass= 450 miles. If he is correct in his understanding that means that he and his wife would never be able to drive home for extended leave for the holidays and what not because that would make it a 8 day trip for travel time.

    I apologize if this seems like a silly question but he is so busy with training that he has not had time to clarafy and we are not an army family so all of this is new to us. Any direction you could send me would be helpful.
     
  2. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    606
    Short answer: no, you are incorrect. He will be able to drive. For holidays, he will take leave anyway.
     
  3. djfrro

    djfrro Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am incorrect in assuming that he can drive further than 350 miles a day or is he incorrect in thinking that he cannot
     
  4. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    606
    Bottom line: Army Safety Regs allow a driver to drive (I think) 9 hours a day. If driving farther he would need an alternate driver (his wife). I'm not sure why you think he's limited to 350. Oh yeah, and btw, no one ever checks or knows how far you drive.

    The 350 he is talking about is a PCS distance. When driving to your new station, you are only required to do 350 miles a day. That determines how many travel days they give you (1200 mile move = 4 travel days).

    Your son and his wife will likely drive home to see you. Once. Then they'll fly.
     
  5. Buckeye

    Buckeye Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    3
    My experience is dated (20+ years) but as a 2LT at FT Hood, my wife and I made several car trips from there to her parents in Louisville, KY. We were able to do it straight through in 14 hours (55 MPH speed limit then so figure 60-65 MPH).

    As Scoutpilot said, after doing it once they will probably want to fly.
     
  6. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,753
    Likes Received:
    1,004
    I'm guessing things have changed in 20+ years. I'm not Army (or any service these days) but when I was at a joint school, a few Army O-4s had to do a nice bit of paper work to leave the area for a holiday weekend. It was a little pathetic, actually.... but then again, I guess 45 year olds need to have their hands held when they leave school for the weekend. :rolleyes:
     
  7. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    606
    School environment is totally different
     
  8. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,753
    Likes Received:
    1,004
    I sure hope so. Each service had a representative. Mine was a CWO in the CG... I said "Paul I'm going to...." and he said "sounds good, here's contact info..."


    Air Force was a little more involved, as was the Navy. Marine Corps a little more.

    And then there was Army, with about three forms, including a trip plan, including rest stops and milage. Not just the majors in my section but a Lt. Col. or two in another section. I mean, here are fully grown adults with 20-25 years of service giving information cadets/midshipmen in other services aren't required to give.
     
  9. djfrro

    djfrro Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    thank you
     
  10. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,807
    Likes Received:
    444
    Regular soldiers to required to do so, hence senior officers should the same thing to.

    Also, what if something happens?

    If a military service member rides a motorcycle without a helmet during off duty time and gets hurt doing a wheely, should he get paid while he is in the hospital and later on get medically retired with VA benefits?
     
  11. GoArmyBeatNavy

    GoArmyBeatNavy Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    Messages:
    668
    Likes Received:
    8
    This a great topic (Safety requirements by rank) and something I have long wrestled with. Probably better for "Life After the Academy" or "Off-Topic" so I won't get into it in depth unless an admin moves it.
     
  12. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    606
    I wouldn't judge an entire service based on whatever the reps at that school required. In every operational unit I've ever served in (which is five, now) it's been just as you described. ("Hey boss, I'm going to X this weekend. There's a pass form in the box just in case something happens.")

    The only time we do the three forms (DA 31 leave form, LES, and TRiPS form) is for leave. If you're flying, they generally ask you to include your flight itinerary, though officers usually don't have to do that. RHIP.
     
  13. sprog

    sprog Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    979
    Likes Received:
    9
    With regard to the VA part of your question, I'll tell you that the situation you've described might not be a bar to benefits. There is a bar for "willful misconduct," which is very circumstance dependent. If he was on leave and doing an off-road dirt bike ride without a helmet, in a place where that activity is legal, he'd probably still be able to receive compensation. This is a hypothetical, of course, so without knowing the facts of record, you can't say for sure. VA statutes and regs can be quite nuanced in interpretation and application to the facts of a case; however, I can tell you that stupidity is not, in and of itself, a bar to benefits. Not to say he wouldn't get something nasty from the Army, but VA makes its own determination.

    If he was drunk, popping up his tires on the interstate and causing others to crash...probably-and I stress the word "probably"-he'd get no benefits.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2012
  14. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    606
    I would disagree with you, counselor, which is rare. Army policy is very strict on PPE for the operation of motorcycles, irrespective of what local laws allow. A 15-6 would likely find him to have been "Not in Line of Duty Due to Own Misconduct"
     
  15. sprog

    sprog Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    979
    Likes Received:
    9
    I don't doubt it. However,-and, by necessity, I'm speaking in the broadest of generalities-I've run across many such determinations which did not bar benefits for VA purposes (especially when there is a good discharge). It's case by case, of course (you'll note my usage of equivocal language-"might," etc.).

    My point was about how VA would view it, and how it might be different from the Army's determination. "Willful misconduct" is the term of art under the VA statutes/regs which is applicable in a case like the hypo above. The Army regs don't necessarily figure in to VA's determination, but could be helpful.

    Your point is taken, and if it were raised in the claim, I'm sure the Army's action on the matter would be considered. Another thing to keep in mind is the population with which VA deals. In today's Army, there probably would be ample evidence of helmet requirements, of safety briefings, of reflective gear mandates, etc. that the vet had exposure to. If he was in in 1962...potentially, a different story.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2012
  16. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    606
    As always, well said.
     
  17. Pkirk618

    Pkirk618 Retired Army

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    All that distance hoopla is used for two functions.

    1. Safety
    2. Per Diem rates

    You want to maximize the length of time allowed for traveling to offset your costs when filing for reimbursement. This includes food, hotel, ATM fees and gas.

    Safety for obvious reasons. The premise of the mileage restriction though more of guidelines is to ensure you don't over do it when traveling. If you get 10 days to travel, use all of it.

    Keep receipts but also understand those same receipts will tell the story on how long you traveled. Of course if you have more than one person driving with you, this will be annotated on your travel forms and figured in the final travel paperwork.
    It will also allow you to travel faster but you won't get the max rates if you do.

    By the way, if you fly, you'll be afforded less time for travel. It will be however, a little easier to file for reimbursement.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2012

Share This Page