question on USNA waiver

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by 17hopefull, Feb 17, 2013.

  1. 17hopefull

    17hopefull New Member

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    Ds took DoDMERB phyical last summer was found qualified for USMA but disqualified for USNA pending a waiver for a color vision deficiency. We have known that he is Red-Green deficient but not color blind, because of regular visits to our own Eye Doctor. After receiving one of our congressmen nominations to UNSA, DS figured he would be sent for a FALANT Test passit and be qualified. DS checked his status on the DoDMERB site hoping to be sent for the test but found that his waiver was denied. My question is: Is there a way to appeal the waiver decision and have the FALANT test preformed? DS would really like to attend USNA and serve in the Navy.
     
  2. JMS

    JMS Member

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    There are existing threads that discuss this in more detail, but in short, if the academy wants an applicant, they will give a acceptance with the condition that the candidate passes the FALANT (or some other test), and arrange for the test. Prior to the conditional acceptance there nothing one can do to speed things along.
     
  3. 17hopefull

    17hopefull New Member

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    Just contacted both DoDMERB and USNA. DS will not be sent for FALANT test they no longer do that test so he will not be granted a waiver this year. He can reapply for the class of 2018 and possibly be granted a waiver. Not sure how that would work since they no longer sent candidates for the test that could get him the waiver................
     
  4. vareporter

    vareporter Member

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    Is it possible to contact your MOC and request that he/she change your child's nomination to the USMA?

    My enlisted Navy son is color deficient, also. (Color blind is really a misnomer. Most people aren't color "blind," they just have trouble distinguishing between two colors). Even though he scored a perfect score on his ASVAB, the jobs he would be able to take was severely limited by his color vision deficiency. The cold, hard facts are that there are plenty of bright, eager young men and women for today's U.S. Navy to choose from. So getting the Navy to compromise standards to allow your child to follow their dream is, unfortunately, a slim possibility. Luckily for my son, his dream job was one of the avenues he could pursue without being hindered by his color vision issues. He's at the Defense Language Institute in intensive language training to become a CTI.

    Best of luck to your child. And I truly hope it all works out for them in the end.
     
  5. 17hopefull

    17hopefull New Member

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    DS has no interest in USMA since he attended both summer program last summer had hopes to go into the field of cyber security and feels the Naval Academy has a better program. Oh we'll I guess it's regular college unless he decides to try again or change his mind.
     
  6. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    I'm a bit confused by USNA's response. Granting a waiver means that they will waive his color deficiency -- IOW, he doesn't need to take the test b/c they assume he is red/green deficient and decide to waive that condition -- appoint him regardless of the condition. USNA can waive up to 2% of each incoming class (~24 people) for colorblindness. Those waived must agree to go restricted line, staff corps or USMC.

    Thus, they could decide to waive him this year regardless of the FALANT test. Their response seems to suggest that they won't waive him this year. I would ask them what would be different next year (nicely, of course). It MAY be that they want to see a set of college grades before deciding to waive . . . but that is only a guess.
     
  7. JMS

    JMS Member

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    I am thinking some of the confusion may be in the terminology. My understanding is a waiver for color vision deficiency is difficult to get. However, if one is given a color vision test other than the PIP, such as the FALANT, and they pass the alternate test, they have 'passed' the test for color vision; thus no waiver required.
    Now, the trick seems to be getting an opportunity to take the FALANT. If they have indeed stopped giving alternate color vision tests, then my DS can fold his tent now. If true, I wish someone official had the decency to inform the applicants long before now. These kids are twisting on a string for a long time. To find out that it was really over last summer due to color vision rule changes would make one angry.
    For what it is worth, we were surprised to learn that MMA has stopped accepting any alternate tests for the first time this year. They did not have the common courtesy to let applicant know this until we saw the DQ on the web page and inquired about why. Knowing that last fall when the condition was revealed would have save us a lot of travel/paperwork and general irritation.
     
  8. kmomto9

    kmomto9 Member

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    hopeful,

    we had the same experience.
    Ds received the USNA nomination from our MOC, he is green deficient. We thought he would receive a remedial from DODMERB to take the FALANT but instead we received a letter saying that the USNA did not approve his waiver, he was unlikely to be qualified for Marines or line staff either and he would not be receiving an appt without even trying the FALANT.
    It was a disappointment, especially after all the work put into the application process but the same day ds received notice that AROTC gave him a full tuition scholarship to his first choice SMC.
    We chalked it up to a good learning experience.
     
  9. Vista123

    Vista123 Member

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    is a waiver for AROTC more likely/less likely dependent on the school choice? or are they completely unrelated?
     
  10. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I believe a waiver is completely unrelated to the school choice. At least I can't see how the school choice would make any difference as to whether or not the Army thinks one could effectively serve. I would also think a waiver for color deficiency or blindness is much more likely in the Army. JMPO though. I'm sure some AROTC experts will speak up.
     
  11. Vista123

    Vista123 Member

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    thanks as always kinmen. son is crossing his fingers that this is true. wants arotc and is working hard (like everyone else) towards a favorable outcome, lots of movable parts but not the color deficiency challenge.
     
  12. BHS

    BHS New Member

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    Hi All - I've read the threads above, but still don't fully understand the standard at USNA on color vision. The US Navy Medical manual lists a passing FALANT as adequate color vision. My DS failed the PIP (10/14) and passed the FALANT easily. He took the test at a private FAA doc office. DODMERB received the results and the eye doctor has said they are acceptable, but his case has still been referred to the waiver authority. It sounds like receiving a waiver for color vision is very difficult. His interest in USNA is engineering and cyber, FWIW, not aviation. Is there anything he can do?
     
  13. proudofmyboy

    proudofmyboy Member

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    The issue with the Navy and color, is seeing the lights at sea..As the saying goes, sailors belong on ships and ships belong at sea..It is a tough one to get around...Best of luck..
     
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  14. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    Work your way through the process a step at a time. Keep asking questions.

    Think of this from the Navy point of view. They have a high-quality production facility, USNA, into which they feed select raw material, and after 4 years of processing, turn out finished basic products ready to go into a variety of areas in the Navy or Marine Corps for further processing and finally productive service. It is to the Navy's advantage to select raw material with the most versatility to meet dynamic production quotas for each of the warfare specialties. Pre-commissioning standards are notoriously tough, and often more stringent than the standards placed on those already serving. The "needs of the Navy" start kicking in during the application process. It will almost always trump the desires of the individual.

    That's just a rough macro view of the Service perspective. Before I went to USNA for duty, the "factory" example was explained to me. A lot of effort and scrutiny goes into the raw material selection, so that cuts down on production problems while in the "factory." Once in the factory, everyone on USNA staff had a responsibility to work hard to ensure the raw material was transformed.

    Sorry you are hitting some rough spots in this area. Navy and Coast Guard have a tough set of standards relating to service at sea, regardless of what other options might be a goal.
     
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  15. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    I shouldn't bother, but sometimes I can't resist.

    Any idea how your DS arrived at a conclusion that the Naval Accademy has a better cyber program?

    For me if your DS' rational was that he doesn't like West Point/Army life style, I got it.

    But the rational of a regular college being better than the USMA just seems illogical to me.
     

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