Question Regarding Aviation

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Darrowboat, Jul 22, 2013.

  1. Darrowboat

    Darrowboat Prospective Officer

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    Hello everybody!

    To make this short my question is:

    Can I become a pilot in the Marine Corps (preferably rotary wing but if fixed wing is an option I will DEFINITELY take it) if I have sight issues?

    I am not sure what my exact sight is but I normally only wear glasses to drive (I can't see far distances) so it is not too bad. Is it a straight no I cannot fly, I have to get laser surgery, or yes I can fly?

    Thank you very much in advance! I'm afraid I am very bad with search engines and could not find a thread asking this question. If there is one I apologize.
     
  2. Full Metal Bulldog

    Full Metal Bulldog Citadel Class of 2016

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    Short answer: yes.
     
  3. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    Yeah, the short answer is yes. When I have more time I will look up the reg.
     
  4. SubSquid

    SubSquid Member

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    "Navy and Marine Corps


    The Navy and the Marine Corps use the same standards (The Marines do not have their own medical department. They use the Navy for all medical procedures and standards). Navy Pilots must pass a Class I Flying Physical. To become a pilot in the Navy or Marine Corps, an applicant's uncorrected vision can be no worse than 20/40 (correctable to 20/20) in each eye. Once flight training begins, vision can deteriorate to no worse than 20/100 (correctable to 20/20) in each eye. After flight training graduation, if the eyesite deteriorates worse than 20/200 (must be correctable to 20/20), the pilot will require a waiver for carrier operations. If the vision deteriorates past 20/400 (correctable to 20/20), the pilot is restricted to aircraft with dual controls (ie, aircraft with co-pilots).
    For Navigators (called "NFOs" or "Navy Flight Officers"), there is no vision requirement to enter flight training. However, the Navigator's vision must be correctable to 20/20 and there are limits on refraction. Refraction must be less than or equal to plus or minus 8.00 sphere in any meridian and less than or equal to minus 3.00 cylinder. No more than 3.50 anisometropia. After flight training, to continue on flight status there is no limit on refraction for NFOs. No waivers are authorized for NFO applicants who exceed these refraction limits.
    Normal color vision is required for both NFOs and pilots. Normal depth perception is required for pilots and pilot applicants.The Navy allows laser eye surgery, both for current pilots and NFOs, and for pilot/NFO applicants, if they apply for, and are accepted to participate in the Navy's on-going study about laser eye surgery for aviators."

    This was the most recent standard I could find for PLC Avaition. It should be the standard for all assention avenues for NavAir. Hope it answers your question.
     
  5. Darrowboat

    Darrowboat Prospective Officer

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    Thank you all for the answers!
     

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