Questions for NROTC. -Unfinished

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Mind Games, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. Mind Games

    Mind Games New Member

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    Good Evening.

    I've collected quite an interest in the NROTC shcolarships over the past few years since I was twelve. It has finally dawned on me at the age of sixteen that I needed to take school seriously and that in order for me to ever achieve goals such as enlisting in one of the most competitive programms in the military I had to mature and start taking care of myself.
    My current situation is a bit stifiling and overwhelming. I am faced with a need to serve my country but also gain an education that will benefit me. Where my problem lies as of now is I have no confidence in my abilities such as leadership, communication skills, and commulitive knowledge. I struggeled through my first two years of highschool due to half-heartedly doing my assignments which is why I'm hesitant about if I'll ever be capable of passing any of the requirements to be accepted to the NROTC scholarship funding.

    I'll be back at 3:45 P.M. GMT-6 Central to finish typing this. For now I have to return to classes.
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    While waiting for more to come...
    It's never too late to start. You may need additional help academically for the "foundational" academics that you missed, perhaps particularly in math.

    I'm sure you are no worse a leader or communicator than the vast majority of high school students your age. There is some natural talent to leading but mostly I've found it's based on past experience which a 16 year old won't have much of. Another key part is simply getting people to want to follow you. It's not a command thing but a desire thing. Seek out leadership positions. Maybe a debate club or something to work on communications, or maybe a school newspaper or yearbook? Don't be afraid to make mistakes. That's how we learn and 9 out of 10 times mistakes can be corrected.

    Don't give up... and there is more than one way to serve and get an education, including enlistment and GI Bill if it comes to that.
     
  3. Mind Games

    Mind Games New Member

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    I don't wish to doubt my skills, I'm confident with many things about myself and I have a high self esteem. So far my courses consist of Anatomy, Biology, IPS (Introductory Physical Science) Geometry A&B (Simplified) Algebra 1&2 (Regular/Advanced) Business Tech Advanced, History, Honors English, and English 11. For my 12th year I plan on taking Marine Biology, the rest I haven't decided.

    I have intentions of joining FBLA soon and also taking a physical exam and taking my ACT/SAT tests this year.

    The above is just to explain my current status, whether I'm eligible for the scholarship or not is for the recruiter to decide. I've heard and seen that the NROTC is supposedly the most competitive scholarship to go for, I browsed and saw some people very hesitant about whether they would get accepted or not and they had perfect scores in advanced college course classes, which makes me feel a bit light weight even though I've recently learned to enjoy school for the education I'm receiving.

    What I planned on doing was gaining an Engineering degree from the University of South Carolina or another college I've yet to decide on. I've received certifications in Microsoft Office and Powerpoint, I'm very creative with computers since I find it to be a nice past-time and I was hoping I could utilize this with the Navy. What I'm not sure of is if this career (though I'd like to be a federally contracted engineer) will work. I understand I am considered "young" to be asking these questions at my age but it is very important to me that I find the career that will help define myself. I wish to break down the wall that keeps me from being social, and learning to use skills that will help me "sell" myself later on for my education.
    To be honest, I sit here chuckling over all of what I typed because I don't know what to do. This is all something I should be consulting a counselor about but I figured I had to get it out some how, I just dislike sitting idle and pondering over how confused I am. :-/

    Thanks,

    -Mind
     
  4. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    You don't sound confused at all and in any case you're taking steps to get unconfused. To me that sounds like a proactive plan.

    Suggest you take a look at the NROTC scholarship web site and see what tier the major(s) you're thinking of fall into. 85% of scholarships will go to tier 1 & 2. I'm pretty sure anything with computers will fall into that but double check it. There may also be other majors you're considering which you could check on as well.

    I also suggest you look at the Navy Web Sites and see what jobs/opportunities the Navy has. I'm sure you could figure out where you could apply any major. However, I would point out that what you major in may, or may not, have anything to do with what you do in the Navy. Also, as an officer you'll be managing others and making sure things get done as opposed to actually doing it (in general).

    BTW, I'm partial to the University of South Carolina. My avatar isn't a Gamecock for nothing! Good luck to you and keep on plugging. Even if you don't get a scholarship consider going in as a college programmer and attempting to get an in-school (sideload) scholarship. Whatever your path actually becomes you'll be well served by pursuing this one even if it doesn't come through.
     
  5. Mind Games

    Mind Games New Member

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    Well, as much as I am glad to hear that, I never gave much thought to the military side of the scholarship, I only thought about the college. I'll find what it is, I was just hoping to learn the leadership skills from the training in college.
     
  6. Strength and Honor

    Strength and Honor Member

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    You can still take Naval Science in college and get those leadership skills. You don't have to commit to the military if you don't want to. Most every college has an ROTC program of some sort.
     
  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Yes, you can take the Naval Science classes in college whether you're part of NROTC or not. However, the real leadership stuff occurs during Navy Lab (among other things) and that is not available unless you are a college programmer (at least). All college programmers who are awarded advanced standing are contracted and assume the commitment to active duty. So, one COULD do two years as a college programmer without incurring a commitment to active duty. However, unless one has a desire to serve in the military I doubt very much they would find being a college programmer very rewarding. I'd be willing to be surprised though.

    The other services work pretty much the same way.
     
  8. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    Just want to clarify that most colleges may have ROTC but not NROTC.

    Also, "leadership" is a growing field of academic study and you will find classes on leadership everywhere. You can find leadership courses in business, psychology, human relations and other areas of study. Some classes are purely academic but others allow application via group projects, internships, etc.

    Good luck!
     
  9. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    +1 to USMCGrunt, as usual. University of South Carolina, which the OP expressed an interest in, offers some leadership programs.
     
  10. Mind Games

    Mind Games New Member

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    I appreciate all of the positive feed back, I have signed up for FLBA today and I am going to continue pursuing my technilogical fields of study. I may take a trade school course next year for computer science or technological engineering. I am excited to say the least. My final questions would be that am I required to be in a sport? And Am I able to apply after the age of 17? I.E. wait till I've graduated high-school then apply.

    Thanks!

    -Mind
     
  11. tazz5213

    tazz5213 Parent

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    If I may, I would like to offer a suggestion.
    If you are looking for the opportunity to gain and learn leadership skills, you may want to see if your high school has an JROTC program. That would help you get a foot in the door that way. And if your school does not have such an opportunity and you are still looking into the Navy, see about joining a Navy Sea Cadet program. This is a great program for those who are interested in maritime history and you get a chance to work with Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard personnel. This can not only help you decide which direction you want to go, but it can help you academically (you have to maintain a certain GPA) and improve your leadership capabilities and help you decide to go commission or enlisted. These are great extra curricular programs that will look great on your scholarship application too. Its never to late to get started.
     
  12. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    First, before I answer your questions, I'd like to add to what tazz recommended above. If there are no flavor of JROTC programs in your area, try looking for Civil Air Patrol. While not Navy related, you'll still get a sense of what NROTC might be like and also get some leadership opportunities if you measure up. You'll learn about leadership in any case.

    You are not required to be in a sport, but almost all applicants are. All ROTC programs want to know that you're physically fit and athletic. That you can handle the day to day of PT and perhaps someday combat. Being in a sports program for an extended period demonstrates that.

    You can apply after you graduate but it would be for the academic semester that starts the autumn, but for the following autumn. Also, you can have no more than 30 college credit hours to be eligible to apply. Not sure what you might have in mind for the following year if you're not already in college so I wanted to mention all that.
     

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