Questions

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by cdh50193, Nov 24, 2010.

  1. cdh50193

    cdh50193 Member

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    Well, unfortunately, my applications for ROTC Scholarships were disqualified because of my Citizenship status. (You must be citizen right now to apply for a Scholarship rather than by next Fall) :frown: So I plan on pursuing ROTC and apply for college-based scholarships once I hit college.

    Now this may sound stupid but I've looked all over the ROTC section in the army/air force websites, but all I can find are Scholarship applications. How can I apply just "normally" without an intent of receiving a scholarship?

    And, in that case, can I apply to all 3 branches because I'm still not sure of which branch I want to serve in.

    Thanks in advance:thumb:
     
  2. CadetMom777

    CadetMom777 Member

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    You apply for the individual ROTC dets through the college you attend. Many schools do this during your new student orientation in the summer. Talk to the PMS at the schools you will be applying to.
     
  3. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    There is no application...what you are doing is enrolling in a class. At my school I have the class added to the incoming freshmen's schedule if they contact me over the summer. If they come to campus it is usually a little difficult to add the class to the schedule after the fact, but we can make that happen too. If you call the ROO at the school you plan to attend, I'm sure they will be happy to get you started. Orientation is also a good time to hunt down the ROTC folks (they will be there somewhere) and have them get you enrolled. And if they don't, take a look at Clarkson University....I'll hook you up!
     
  4. cdh50193

    cdh50193 Member

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    Thanks for the reply guys.

    So I won't have to make a decision on this until the near-end of my senior year eh? (Summer would be kinda too late)

    And one more general question.

    For those of you who commute to college, and say in my case I might have a chance to because I can't afford room and board costs, it would take me generally 1-2 hours to take a train to my college, would you normally have a class right after Pt in the morning? or must I take a return trip home, and go again later for classes?

    Thanks in advance
     
  5. cjs

    cjs Member

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    I can only tell you about Army ROTC.

    You will have PT 3 days per week at 6 am on Monday , Wednesday and Fridays. There are days when my son has to be there at 5:30. You may be running 4 miles so you will need to shower afterwards and change out of your PT uniform.
    As a commuter you will just have to arrange your classes around the fact you commute and ROTC PT, class and ROTC lab.
     
  6. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    It also depends on Battalions. Mine offers 3,5, and 7 day PT programs with majority on 5 day.
     
  7. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    Here is another option to consider. Talk to a National Guard or Reserve recruiter about enlisting in the Guard or Reserves, and enroll in ROTC class at college. Once you get your citizenship you'll be able to contract. You will also be able to take advantage of tuition assistance, GI bill, and drill pay. That will make college more affordable, and may allow you to live on campus. TA usually pays up to the cost of tuition at a state school, so you would be looking to cover room and board (roughly 10K), which drill pay will help cover.

    More than one way to skin a cat.
     
  8. The OC Josh

    The OC Josh Member

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    Often colleges have Sports facilities that students can use. You might be able to shower and change there after PT so you don't lose all that time going back and forth between home and school.
     
  9. cdh50193

    cdh50193 Member

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    Thanks for the reply guys, really appreciate it.

    In my case, I'm choosing between a host college, which is for both AF and Army (Boston University) and if that's the case, I have to dorm there (which will cost more money). Otherwise, I'm staying near my home and will attend NYU Polytech and probably commute. Also, I'm not 100% sure if I should go for Air Force rather than Army, but so far, I'm planning on going AF having the BTG program in mind if anything such as not able to receive a pilot slot. But NYU Polytech is still 1-2 hour train ride away, and the host college for AF in this area would be Manhattan College, which is still pretty far, Fordham University for Army (same distance).

    I mean, both of these Universities have distinguished engineering programs, which I am planning on to major (Sucks I'm not a Citizen yet, can't apply for HS Scholarships, but hopefully will try to go after some college-based), it's not an easy choice. Considering my parents, as well as myself, want to stay in New York, rather than to go to Boston . :confused:

    But then again, I have a lot of time to decide. :biggrin:

    And I did some research on the Simultaneous program with the Guards and Reserve, but as of right now, I plan on AF, but I'll still have that in the back of my head.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2010
  10. educateme

    educateme Member

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    have you thought about taking a gap year, if you are certain that by next fall, you will get your citizenship?

    Consider the following:

    (1) It looks like you are aware that even the merit awards are really NOT blind to nationality. For international student (and you are an international student as long as they are concerned since you don't have a citizenship), this is an issue. In many (perhaps even most) schools, merit scholarships are mostly a tool for them to recruit top students who otherwise might not choose them - in short, the money is an incentive to lure you. As such, the odds of getting merit scholarship ONCE you are already a student is much, much lower than getting a scholarship as a freshman applicant. Hence, you shouldn't assume that you can start your freshman year as a non-citizen without merit award, and get a merit scholarship once you become a citizen.

    (2) The need based financial aid that will help you in case of less than 4 year national scholarship is also contingent upon the citizen status. Many (even most) schools that go on and on about how they are meeting full financial needs and their admissions policies are need blind will have a caveat/fine print that excludes international students (anybody without a citizenship, regardless of whether you have a green card or not).

    (3) Campus ROTC scholarship is NEVER a sure thing. If you decide to go to a school, and if you don't get a scholarship, what are you going to do? Can you afford the pay for the full 4 years in whatever school you go to?

    (4) the more I learn about this whole thing, I am starting to think the ROTC scholarship (at least in Army) is much more than money. It gives you the "contracted" status as soon as possible, and there are some highly sought after summer programs and additional training opportunities and what not that are not available to ROTC cadets who are not contracted.

    If you get a 3 year AD scholarship, you won't be contracted until the beginning of your sophomore year, and whatever sought after training opportunities during the summer after the freshman year is not available to you. If you don't get a campus scholarship, and become a non-scholarship ROTC cadet, I believe the earliest time for contract is the beginning of the junior year, at which point, you already missed out on highly sought after training programs his/her cohorts were able to benefit from. This, in turn, disadvantage you in the branch selection OML.

    In the big scheme of things, one year spent as a gap year is a very, very short detour and delay, and especially, if you explain this in the ROTC scholarship application next fall (meaning, you took a gap year to become a citizen and then apply for the ROTC scholarship), I would think they will have absolutely no problem with that - if anything, that would make you look really focused and committed, I would think.

    It's a non-linear option, but think about it.

    CAVEAT: my opinion on (4) is based on discussions and anecdotal feedback my son got from various PMSs, ROO, etc. I never heard this as an official policy. So, anybody who can contradict me with fact based data, please do so.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2010

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