RE: ADHD medications after age 14

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by sbducks, Apr 5, 2012.

  1. sbducks

    sbducks New Member

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    Hi,

    My son wants to go ROTC AF and he is currently a Junior in HS. He has not had an official diagnosis of ADHD as we did not complete all of the testing, but a neurologist did a trial of Focalin to see if it helped which it did. So he has been on Focalin for less than 24 months, and is now attempting neurofeedback to decrease the need of medicine. He has not had any school IEP's or plans, and has not had any accomodations given for testing or classes.

    My question is this: when you need to get documentation of the total cumulative months of medicine use, what would constitute proof? Would it be the total # of months a prescription was issued, or # of months the prescription was filled, or just counting the months it was used?

    My son only used meds for actual school work, and not for weekends or summers. So I am just wondering what is the way to figure out, with documentation, what the DODMERB would use to count the months of use.

    Thanks,
    sbducks
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2012
  2. FallenAngel77

    FallenAngel77 Member

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    I cannot answer your question with a cite to a regulation, but I can tell you my DS' experience. He used medication from 1st grade through 9th, of course, at the doctor's suggestion. The medication was prescribed to allow things to slow down so he could learn to focus. He did not use the medicine during summer or weekends. He quit cold turkey at the beginning of 10th grade because he knew he had to in order to reach his ultimate dream of attending an academy. His grades went up after he quit taking the medication. The medication had served as intended, it taught him to focus. When he went through the DODMERB process, we had to provide every medical record from 1st grade on. We also had him tested at the suggestion of the physician who did the DODMERB physical because he did not believe he has ADHD. We took his advice. The psychologist we sent him to concurred and we submitted that as well. That was sufficient for his medical and he was not disqualified. Epilogue: He received offers to the Civilian Prep programs for AF and WP. He is now a cow at West Point!
     
  3. momcolo

    momcolo New Member

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    A bit of a different situation... but may be helpful.
    DS was diagnosed with ADHD and on a very low dose Rx of Ritilan.

    The issue with Dodmerb was not that he had been diagnosed with ADHD, but the amount of time he was on his medication. I believe they're looking for the candidate to be off medication for 12 months. Luckily DS stopped taking the RX for 12 months before his file was reviewed by SA's / ROTC. He was DQ'ed, but waiver was granted after he provided Doctor's records of RX scripts written, and the records showed that last Rx was written 3 months before he stopped taking the meds.... and 12 months before his file was reviewed.

    I don't believe your issue (or what could DQ your DS) is his diagnosis (or lack there of), IEP's, accomodations or similar. It's the MEDICATION .... and NOT how long he's been on it... but how long he's been off it.
     
  4. mellowgator

    mellowgator Member

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    good point. being off meds for a year is what got my girl her waiver for using an inhaler after the age of 13. she had documentation of being off meds for a year and waiver was approved and no further testing was required by dodmerb or usma.

    my daughter just made the cutoff by stopping her meds in march of her junior year.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012
  5. dohdean

    dohdean Member

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    Check actual DodMerb regulations on DodMerb website as there have been changes over the past 4 years re ADD/ADHD medication and when they must be stopped prior to application. It used to work if student stopped in Junior year. Two years ago, I think, there was a change and it became after the 14th birthday (or something similar). You can't always rely on another student's experience -- depends on reg in effect at time of application, along with other things including the specific Dx, etc. Accommodations (IEP and 504 for example) ARE important under certain of the regs. I was recently told that a student cannot have extra time accommodations on the submitted SAT/ACT test -- I am not sure if that is in effect now but I think it is. It all depends on the regulations at the time of the application.
     
  6. bjkuds

    bjkuds Parent

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    It used to be no meds for 12 months prior to physical. It changed 2 years ago to be no meds for more than 24 months after 14th birthday. DS is caught in the middle, we didn't know it changed. When I checked with the military after DS showed interest the standard was 12 months, so we kept him on them until he learned to drive.. 6 months too long. We won't know the outcome for a while whether he will get the waiver until he goes for advanced standing in NROTC,, he is a college programmer and hasn't had a physical yet. Just hoping his academic performance in college/SMC and the last 2 years of HS without meds will be enough to get the waiver.
     

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