Reapply 4-year national NROTC scholarship

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by tienchieh, Apr 11, 2016.

  1. tienchieh

    tienchieh Member

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    My DS is still waiting for his NROTC scholarship decision. In the case if he doesn't get it this time around, he is thinking reapplying for the 4-year national scholarship as well as competing the 3 or 2 year sideloads.
    For those being there and done that, I'm soliciting the ideas of how to successfully reapply this?
    Any point is much appreciated!
     
  2. rocatlin

    rocatlin Member

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    Definitely can be done. My son reapplied for the 4 year MO scholarship. He was awarded the scholarship in the early board during his 1st semester of his freshman year. He also had a Navy college program classmate get selected for the 4 year as well.

    Start the application as soon as it opens, but don't necessarily rush it. Make sure he addresses any perceived weaknesses and updates with new information. The goal is to have it submitted before the first boards start meeting in the fall, but no need to get it submitted early summer.

    He'll need to contact the freshman advisor or appropriate person in the unit he's going to be joining to get the process started for college program.
     
  3. FFDDG

    FFDDG Member

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    DD reapplied during freshman year for Navy Nurse scholarship and was awarded during the second semester. She also participated as a college programmer. Personally, I think these type of applicants have a leg up on those coming right out of high school. Although it is a 4 year award, the reality is that the scholarship is for remaining 3 years.
     
  4. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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    If your son does not get the National this go around, he should re-create his application this summer and show up as a College Program student at his desired NROTC unit this fall with an 80-90% solution. He should sit down with the Freshman Advisor in the first couple weeks of school to turn that application into a finished product. The units are all very good at this, so he just needs to take the initiative now and communicate with the unit early if he ends up not getting the scholarship this month.
     
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  5. tienchieh

    tienchieh Member

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    "If your son does not get the National this go around, he should re-create his application this summer and show up as a College Program student at his desired NROTC unit this fall with an 80-90% solution."
    Can you elaborate what "80-90% solution" means? Sorry, new here.
     
  6. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I suppose I should just let NavyNOLA reply but I think the intent was to complete 80-90% of the application over the summer; and review and work out the rest with the unit in the fall.
     
  7. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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    Show up at the unit with an application that is a near-final product, and then the unit staff will assist by recommending final edits and changes in order to create the best application possible. The staff will have the insider knowledge that will help your son improve the quality of his application. Once the application is complete and blessed, they'll administer the fitness assessment and officer interview in-house. Having an interview conducted by the Commanding Officer of the NROTC unit (after he/she has observed your son for a few weeks) will make all the difference- their evaluation carries significantly more weight than that of a random Chief or Lieutenant.
     
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  8. Row2020

    Row2020 Member

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    Very helpful advice!! Thank you!
     
  9. tienchieh

    tienchieh Member

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    Thank you very much for all the advice.
     
  10. tienchieh

    tienchieh Member

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    Sorry, another question:
    Reapplying 4-year national scholarship is a different thing than competing for a 3-year or 2-year sideload?
     
  11. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Yes. You can basically start your 4-year national application now and its the same process you used last year.

    It may have changed a bit but you can apply for the 3 or 2 year sideload beginning your second semester freshman year thru your sophomore year. The application is submitted through your cadre and they'll generally review and assist. It's a different application. It is also a national competition but of course you're only competing against other Navy Option or Marine option midshipmen. For Marine option at least it includes an assessment from your MOI (or did). I expect Navy option is from the PMS, so how you do in the unit is important. Be on the ball.

    If you don't get a sideload you can apply for advanced standing your rising junior year. They used to use the same application as the final sideload application but my rumor mill tells me that's not the case anymore.
     
  12. rocatlin

    rocatlin Member

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    My son's reapplication was basically complete when he started as a college programmer. In our part of the Recruiting District, the RS XO and OSO have a close relationship with the MOI. In my son's case, the MOI happened to be on the early board. Of course, "Individual results may vary."

    The short of it is, build up the best packet you can. Go all in. Make a positive impression on those around you through your desire and work ethic.
     

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