Reapplying

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by surgicalghost13, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. surgicalghost13

    surgicalghost13 Member

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    Alright, I've read on multiple threads the topic of reapplying next year to WP if not granted an appointment this year. The idea is to get a college load consisting something like Calc, Eng comp, History, Chem, and maybe computer science or something. Obviously the goal is to get a 3.7 ish or better. So lets say someone does not get in this year has ACT scores of around 30-31, ranked in the top 10% of his/her high school class, has a couple varsity letters, etc. Basically, a qualified and squared away candidate that for some reason or another wasn't selected this year. How much weight does reapplying carry (assuming you get a 3.7 or higher in those classes previously stated)? Does just that year of college and the proven determination really put the application in the next tier?
     
  2. Jacobryan10

    Jacobryan10 Member

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    Well, it certainly does not hurt. It shows you are motivated to do well, and that you actually want to go to West Point. My friend did not get in his first run through, and the second time he applied he got a LOA almost immediately. The important thing is to get your app done ASAP and talk to your RC/MALO about ways to improve your application. If you can pull off a 3.5 GPA in college (in engineering or math based.) you have a great chance of getting in.
     
  3. BigNick

    BigNick Member

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    Many people go to WP after a year of college or Prep School. Make sure you take challenging courses that are heavy in math and science. Your college grades will be more important than your SATs and High School grades since these are just indicators of how you will do in college. Keep in close contact with your Regional Admissions officer and MAKE SURE YOU GET ALL PARTS OF YOUR APPLICATION DONE VERY EARLY NEXT YEAR.
    Having been on the Admissions Committee for two years I PROMISE YOU that the people who get their files completed early have a much better chance of getting admitted. There are some very highly qualified people who are just completing their files now who will not get in.
    I have heard RCs talk about the more agressive applicants in very positive tones. Many Admissions people see applicants who get their files completed early as "go-getters" who really want to go to West Point. The late filers create a negative impression. Fair or not that is the way it is.
     
  4. djjon22

    djjon22 Member

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    I know a plebe this year who applied three times to the academy. There is always room for improvement.
     
  5. scottgd

    scottgd New Member

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    Do those who reapply after a freshman year in college have to have ROTC?

    T's gds
     
  6. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    let me pose the question back to you -- if you were an Admissions Officer at WP, reading the file, wouldn't you ask why the applicant didn'ttake advantage of the ROTC opportunity, assuming it is present on the campus of the applicant's civilian college?

    I'm now using common sense, as I have not sat on the the WP admissions committee. IF the applicant's college does not have a host ROTC unit, but rather a cross town affiliate, I could understand the travel issues might preclude involvment... but even then, if an applicant cannot scrape together 10-12 hours per week plus travel time, I'd want to know WHY not?

    FYI: The great majority (let's say 75%+) of ROTC participants (this means weekly Class, weekly 2.5 hr. lab, and morning Phycical Training anywhere from 2-4 days per week, 06:30 usually) are not on scholarship and do not receive any financial incentives. If you add up the time commitment of a first year ROTC participant, it's about 10-12 weekly hours, plus a couple of weekends for training. Half those hours are during times most students are sleeping in after staying up too late. :smile:
     

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